91

If you want to actually take the promotion, discuss the problem with the manager suggesting you for the promotion. I would love to accept right now, but I have calculated that if I accept now, it would actually be a loss to me due to how we are changing to the new system next year. As I am committed to stay in the company long-term, that works out to a ...


15

The appraisal system in our company is going to change next year. What if is the new rule is called off for some reason? What if the rules and policies change, after you decline the promotion this time, offering more-or-less the same as now? What if any other associated terms and conditions are changed, so somehow you become non-eligible for the promotion ...


13

Realistically, you should never turn down a merit promotion. While you are correct, you might be eligible for a bigger raise next year, that likely assumes the promotion and salary budget of the company is going to increase significantly. More than likely, the budget the company has to promote people stays relatively the same, and the new range of raises is ...


8

Therefore, I was thinking about the consequences of declining a potential promotion this year. I do understand that decline the potential promotion this year gives no guarantee that I will get it next year. What is the best way to approach this situation? Think it through now. Be prepared when and if the promotion is offered. Be quick with a ...


6

Consider that at will works in both directions. If your employer doesn't like you, they can get rid of you (as long as it's not for something protected, like age, race, etc). Similarly, if you're unhappy with your employer, you're totally free to go work elsewhere without repercussions. Of course, reality is often more complicated than that, but it can be ...


6

Even though I always advocate for transparency and honesty, in this case, I don't see any benefits for mentioning this, if you're quite sure you will be leaving the company in the next year or two. If you say that's your plan, your employer will, most likely, avoid giving you any long-term positions or responsibilities and place the bet on some other ...


6

One or two years is well within the scope of a normal decision-timeline about raises and promotions. Don't tell your employer you are leaving within such a scope because a solid raise and promotion is often an gamble on the part of the company: not worth it in the short term but quite possibly great in a few years. By telling them you will leave within ...


5

Personally, in a situation like this I’d answer the question with an unspoken “[Assuming you were to stay here permanently], what would be your longer term goals?”


5

I think you're worrying unnecessarily. If your boss had serious issues with your work, they should have told you long ago. Most likely, your boss just has a lot of other things to worry about and has no complaints. It feels like I should have more to show for 6 months of work No, even an experienced developer takes months to produce anything significant ...


4

If you decline the promotion and someone else gets it then you'll be waiting even longer for a promotion and the pay raise you want. Realistically, you should accept the promotion now assuming you can handle the responsibility. You can lightly ask about the pay raise conditions but don't make it seem like an ultimatum. Switching jobs has become the norm ...


3

Yes, whatever revision you want to have in your payout, the performance review is the event to discuss about it. It does not matter at what time the payout takes place (for bonus), having a clear idea on your expectation (for the organization) and the actual amount agreed (from your side) makes things clear and leaves no room for a surprise at a later point ...


3

100% No. When they ask about your long term goals, that means your long term goals within the company. Goals that working for the company will help you achieve. If they ask long term goals personally, you talk about areas that you want to learn or improve on that are related to your position in the company. The last thing they want to hear is that you plan ...


3

Don't worry, you're doing fine. it always seems like it takes me longer to complete tasks than I think it should 6 month probation All of this is very common, even standard experience of a junior developer. Keep improving, focus on the task you're given, don't worry, you're doing fine.


2

Normally, you should approach management about this topic after a performance review, so you would be impacted much. BUT, you also want a salary increase. That makes things more difficult. So you are left with pretty much one option. Discuss the topic during the evaluation review - more specifically, during setting the targets for the next year. Of course, ...


2

It very much depends how big a deal it is to you and what you want from the annual review. If you just want a raise then you normally keep the review positive. If you're upset enough to contemplate leaving then you have nothing to lose by pointing out what it would take for you to stay. Because a review can work both ways. Job satisfaction is a big deal to ...


2

You are ambitious and want to advance. That is good. Most companies like it when employees want to take more responsibility. Instead of "fighting" for your advancement, I suggest you ask for advice. "What can I do to prepare myself for more responsibilities here at Initrode?" If you can find a mentor who is not your manager, that might be helpful. A ...


2

In a comment, you clarified your question as, when should I talk about this then Ideally, you should never literally complain - although, that's a bit of a semantic argument. Instead of thinking of this as a complaint, frame it as an opportunity. That seems like a bit of silly management speak, but there's value in approaching problems as opportunities ...


1

Rather than saying something along the lines of "these are all the things I hate" frame it as "these are all the reasons you need me". The idea of an annual review is to show the company all the ways you are doing well and for them to talk to you about ways you can improve. Never aim to compare yourself to others, or bad mouth your colleagues. Don't tell ...


1

If capability isn't valued and you feel yourself capable, then you should start to look for other employment opportunities. whatever comes out of the current situation, this company seems to be a bad fit for you in the long run. Do whatever keeps you employed while searching for a company that's capability-driven, there are many of them out there. Good ...


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