11

I wouldn't suggest being "suspicious" in that there isn't a nefarious reason for this that makes sense. In an environment where there is high turnover of skilled positions, continuing to show up everyday may be enough to "exceed expectations". The simplest explanation to me is there is a misalignment in level of expectations between ...


6

If what you are telling is correct, it looks like they are trying to establish a paper trail to be able to fire you for bad performance, because they want to get rid of you for other reasons. You didn't write your country, so I assume it's a country where you can't fire someone on the spot. It's also possible that your performance is poor or just perceived ...


5

Welcome to a very unsolved problem in software development. As an industry, we have never figured out a reasonable set of OKRs. Everything from lines of code to tickets completed to number of points completed to bugs fixed to lack of bugs has been used. There is no consensus on any development OKRs and plenty argue that nearly any implementation of numerical ...


4

I think your behaviour doesn't sound good... but in the current organisation, if other people are not even turning up at the office - then sleeping for 4hours is certainly better than that. If you've outlasted all those people, you definitely know more about the work, and the documentation. I think you've got what qualifies as a "cushy job" - ...


3

You're asking the wrong question. What do you want to be? Having been in a somewhat similar situation, what I came back to is this: programming is what I've done for fun for the last 27 years. I like it and it comes naturally to me (with practice of course!). I am a programmer. Does that apply to you, or do you find you have to force yourself to like ...


2

point of wondering if my company is blind They often look at things narrowly. All that matters is what your managers/reviewers see. My managers interact with me directly maybe 20 minutes a week directly now that we are remote. There are weeks where I don’t speak to either of them at all. I then sit in on a 4 hour sprint meeting with everyone where I barely ...


1

First you need to check if your boss is the one who want good employees or one that want to "produce" managers. Remember that in some companies you cannot go past certain pay if you are not promoted to certain groups or position. With that in mind embelish WHY you don't want to do certain things. For example for me it was my inability to enforce ...


1

Should I be suspicious about anything? I don't see anything in you post to be suspicious about sounds like a standard government job. There is a problem here though. Eventually (maybe even now) you'll be paid a handsome wage for doing virtually no work and when you look at other jobs you'll have to take a pay cut to do more work. There will be the odd job ...


1

Others may be right, but from my experience what matters most in the workplace is whether your bosses simply like you on a personal level. This is normally just to some degree influenced by your performance. Mostly this has to do with the "chemistry" between you. If they like you, you can slack off and be a jerk to others and you will still get ...


1

The use of annual goals when the time on a project is much shorter than that doesn't make a lot of sense. I know many companies that keep to the annual cycle, even when their own documents say that when you switch projects/teams you should be evaluated and then new goals added based on the new position. Trying to write goals that aren't linked to your daily ...


1

Here's what I understand about OKRs: the setting of them should be a collaboration between you and your manager. The manager sets the objective and you come up with they key results to show you're meeting the objective. In addition, the objective should be linked to objectives set at a higher level in the business as well. The setting of OKRs in isolation ...


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