106

Based on your statements in the question, I'm going to write the answer(s) How to cope with this situation? If you want monetary benefits, shift your priority to produce quantity rather than quality. If you can manage to retain same quality as of now, without burning yourself out, that's added benefit - but focus should be on quantity. Reason: You said ...


91

If you want to actually take the promotion, discuss the problem with the manager suggesting you for the promotion. I would love to accept right now, but I have calculated that if I accept now, it would actually be a loss to me due to how we are changing to the new system next year. As I am committed to stay in the company long-term, that works out to a ...


67

"...in the meetings, my manager wants everyone to be 'me'..." This is a vital detail that should be the lede in your question and not buried in a comment to an answer. This is the one thing that distinguishes your question from all the other complaints about unappreciated extra effort at work. It is also the one thing that you can use as leverage. "Our ...


19

Your employer has made clear where their priorities lie and gone so far as to set up incentives to make sure their directives are followed. It is admirable that you take pride in your work, but that isn't what your employer is paying you to do. They want more, not better. In the eyes of your employer, you are an under-performer. Your choices, thus, are as ...


17

This is an easy one. You will need a job anyway in 7 months and your employer doesn't mind if you leave earlier. There is no renewing this contract. There is no benefit for you if you delay. Do what you can to get better at your job and at the same time look for another one.


15

The appraisal system in our company is going to change next year. What if is the new rule is called off for some reason? What if the rules and policies change, after you decline the promotion this time, offering more-or-less the same as now? What if any other associated terms and conditions are changed, so somehow you become non-eligible for the promotion ...


13

As the saying goes, "Politics is the art of saying 'Nice Doggy' while looking for a rock" The only way to avoid the issue is to just respond with positive feedback on everything until you can find employment elsewhere. From what you've posted, they are unwilling to work with you, unwilling to address anything you have brought up, and are generally being an ...


13

In most places, performance reviews are confidential between employee and their line manager, so not available....


13

Realistically, you should never turn down a merit promotion. While you are correct, you might be eligible for a bigger raise next year, that likely assumes the promotion and salary budget of the company is going to increase significantly. More than likely, the budget the company has to promote people stays relatively the same, and the new range of raises is ...


11

How should I proceed in this situation? Start asking the boss questions again. It is better to have a problem of asking too many questions instead of having the problem of not asking any questions. If you feel that the boss could help by answering a question then you should at least ask the question. Remember that asking questions is never pointless ...


11

I wouldn't suggest being "suspicious" in that there isn't a nefarious reason for this that makes sense. In an environment where there is high turnover of skilled positions, continuing to show up everyday may be enough to "exceed expectations". The simplest explanation to me is there is a misalignment in level of expectations between ...


10

Might not apply, but I think an important aspect is that more "quality" is not inherently better: of course the deliverable will be better in some way if you spend more time on it, but perhaps it will take more time to be deliver, which is not what the client wants. It depends very much on the product, but since your client doesn't seem too concerned about ...


9

Is giving negative feedback based on anonymous hearsay acceptable for a manager ? For your manager, it was not anonymous. Someone said this to him in some way, so he knows who that person was, but was refraining from disclosing that information to you (which was good, as to avoid to make it personal). Chances are that this person is someone your manager ...


9

We work to live, not the other way around. People have priorities, and they change (over time). If your changed life priorities warrants that you need to have the work arrangement changed, so be it. You are very right, never go into the mode where you want to "threaten" the employer, as I read so far your work experience has been good. You get into a ...


9

I suspect your actual error is not missing the deadline; it's that the first your manager heard about the restarts, the choice of a technology you don't know well, or even the ever-shifting requirements is when the deadline came and you weren't ready. You may not want to keep this job, but if you do, I encourage you not to think of the daily reports as a ...


8

Seth R's answer is good. But there is a common industry name for this. Gold Plating "In the usual gold plating scenario, a programmer adds features ... because they’re “cool” or fun or seem like they’d be really useful. And sometimes they are — but more often, they’re just wasted effort, at least from the perspective of the person paying the programmer’s ...


8

Would it be better to search for a more structure company? If you personally don't feel comfortable working there, and think you will perform better in a more structured company then go for it. Only you know what kind of company suits you better. How common is it for a company to throw juniors in the middle of a team without any instruction/feedback? ...


8

That depends a lot on why exactly your friend is on a pip. However, offering "a month to look" doesn't sound good. You friend needs to carefully examine the situation and fully understand the reasons why he is on a pip. Even if that's uncomfortable. If he has no idea what's happening and why, than he should go with the "look" option. If he knows exactly ...


8

Therefore, I was thinking about the consequences of declining a potential promotion this year. I do understand that decline the potential promotion this year gives no guarantee that I will get it next year. What is the best way to approach this situation? Think it through now. Be prepared when and if the promotion is offered. Be quick with a ...


7

Disclaimer: I don't know your country, culture/economics may make my answer not best suited to your case Asking for a raise is your right, and doesn't mean you will leave It is normal to ask for a raise regularly. Of course, you can't ask a 10% raise each month, but an annual raise linked to inflation is, in my opinion, a minimum, as otherwise it means you ...


7

Frankly I feel a little disgusted but I don't know if this is common or not. Sadly, it's very common. If it makes you feel any better, your disgust is shared by most middle managers I know (including me). How do I effectively communicate this rating to my team member while remaining professional? I asked my manager for advice and he said ...


7

I've seen this happen before. I had an old employer with a 1-5 rating system. When I was a manager we were told not to have too many rated 4 or above as this would "mess up the numbers". It is discouraging that this type of thought continues. Management is thinking that this will incentivize those in the middle to "work harder". What really happens is ...


7

Just be honest. It's generally the best policy after all! Something along the lines of: One of my goals was to increase web page visits, however the campaign that was designed to help with this objective was delayed and therefore I was not able to complete that goal this time around. Be sure to discuss how you plan to achieve that goal going forward and ...


7

Consider that at will works in both directions. If your employer doesn't like you, they can get rid of you (as long as it's not for something protected, like age, race, etc). Similarly, if you're unhappy with your employer, you're totally free to go work elsewhere without repercussions. Of course, reality is often more complicated than that, but it can be ...


7

You seem to have taken on a team that has little to no motivation and some seriously bad habits. As the lead, you need to understand that you have responsibility to 1) set clear and achievable expectations and 2) hold your team members to them. Your team have had a long time to build their bad habits, so you need to bring some clarity to what you expect, ...


6

Some years ago, I got a hint that my (Netherlands) employer was not going to renew my contract. I was already looking for a new job anyway and had an interview lined up, so I just accelerated those plans and accepted the job offer when it came. I managed negotiate my exit and quit, before they had a chance to let me go. It is easier to move to a new job ...


6

Your managers role is to help you develop and this feedback is designed to help you develop. As you said, he has helped you develop in the past. If managers had to justify every single bit of feedback, through traceable evidence, it would be to the detriment to the workplace. There is nothing to suggest the person complained about you, or even criticised ...


6

I did not properly communicate this technology change to other team members, and their expectations were that project should be completed sooner on my part, not later like it turned out to be. It sounds like there's a legitimate issue here, so it's not clear what there is to disagree with or comment on. Speaking with your manager and assuring him/her that ...


6

One or two years is well within the scope of a normal decision-timeline about raises and promotions. Don't tell your employer you are leaving within such a scope because a solid raise and promotion is often an gamble on the part of the company: not worth it in the short term but quite possibly great in a few years. By telling them you will leave within ...


6

Even though I always advocate for transparency and honesty, in this case, I don't see any benefits for mentioning this, if you're quite sure you will be leaving the company in the next year or two. If you say that's your plan, your employer will, most likely, avoid giving you any long-term positions or responsibilities and place the bet on some other ...


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