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0

You could put your name as an HTML comment. If you don't mind some ongoing maintenance, you could even put "If there are any technical problems with the website, please email Your Name your@email.com", again as an HTML comment. The end product would look less professional if the attribution was visible. The client would be advertising your services ...


2

Now, I'm thinking of saying it's an all in one take it or leave it, because I did it for free at least let me take credit for it. It's not your website. This is not your decision to make. You can ask for permission to put a note giving you credit. But you need to respect the website owner's wishes. And you need to respect your employer's directive, assuming ...


15

Thing is, you didn't make the site for the client, you made it for your employer. Your employer is the one providing it to the client, so if they don't like the note in the footer, you can't really argue with that. - You weren't obligated to do the work, and it's up to you if you hand it over to your employer however, now they've already seen it, it would be ...


6

you are under no obligation to deliver free work, and they are under no obligation to receive it. Ultimately, your actual employer makes the call. Remember he's not the boss because he's right, he's right because he's the boss.


5

Your employer may feel that footer doesn't look professional (and I would agree). While your intention and sentiment are good, professionalism matters in this case. Even though you did it on your time and didn't charge the client, the work will still be associated with your company and their image/reputation because of the app that goes with the site that ...


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