Hot answers tagged

216

In your example, you tell the caller that Y is not available. Since they are only interested in talking to Y, they only inquire about when to call back. I would suggest that you do not mention the availability of Y, but rather directly start gathering information. Ask who the caller is; if they are rude enough not to introduce themselves immediately, then ...


174

Unfortunately, there's no shortcut, it really is a matter of getting familiar with Indian accent, speed, and inflections. These can be very challenging. That said there are some things that will help. If your company hasn't invested in good conference-call/phone equipment, they should, this is exactly what that stuff is designed for! Use a really good ...


146

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


115

I don't consider interviews as tests that can be passed or failed, but at opportunities to gauge whether the interviewee would fit the position I'm seeking filled. If they went through the trouble of researching what I might ask and prepared the answers on a sheet of paper, I might actually consider that a good thing, because it could show their ...


112

Communicate with them via email. That also has the advantage that you can review their emails later in case you forget something. It also helps with the timezone difference.


97

Depending on the laws in your area, a misstatement could result in liability on the doctor. Having a script to go by is not unusual, as some information may need to be restricted, or not disclosed for legal, or insurance reasons. Again, this varies. If the laws regarding medical information in your locale are NOT strict, then this is micromanaging, but ...


90

Since you are a supervisor of one of the teams, you can tell everyone on the call that you can't hear a team member's status update when someone else on the line is talking or there is noise on the line. You could ask that all team members hold their comments and responses until a team member has finished giving their update. You could go as far as having ...


87

I am terrified the call ended before "cat" and that Andy heard it! Is there a recommended practice for handling this? I recommend not worrying about this until you know it's actually a problem. Most likely Andy didn't hear exactly what you worry that he/she heard. Most likely the call didn't end on exactly that syllable. Even if he/she did, it may not ...


85

Tell them that the client's name is confidential and I cannot tell them that. You have already identified the correct solution. If they start trying to cajole and bully you tell them that if the situation were reversed and another agent was trying to get the client's name they would be unhappy if you gave it out. If they are professional they should ...


84

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


78

Part of the equation here is for you to understand the people on the other end of the phone and your purpose. Your boss, and many people like her, use people like you to screen the calls. The boss doesn't like fielding dozens of sales calls a day. It gets old real quick. At the same time, the sales people calling know that they are being screened. They ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


62

I think that being unable to take a phone call is going to be so unusual to a recruiter (or a prospective employer) that unless you can give a good reason they'll just perceive you as "awkward" and pass over your application. The best reason is usually the truth, e.g. My location has no cell/data coverage and I only have limited web access. I can call ...


60

In this situation, can the call not go to voice mail or an automated attendant? If you have either of these, let the system handle it, otherwise you could forward the calls to the office where the receptionist is working. When asked to answer the phone by a colleague, I would reply something like "I cannot right now" and act (or better yet be) busy, "Can ...


54

How to convey that you are the person they are asking for I think the main reason for the confusion is not the initial greeting, but the "Yes?" It's unclear whether you mean "Yes, go ahead" or "Yes, I'll just go get him for you," which is why you're getting that split-second hesitation as they try to work out what you meant. The normal way of replying when ...


54

If they won't tell you who they are, or leave a message, it means they're making a sales call. That's why they won't tell you; they know you won't put them through if they do. You're acting as a call-screener for your boss, so this is expected behavior to a large degree. (Wasting your time, rather than your boss's time.) So, the short answer to your ...


52

What can be done to prevent people from leaving their cell phones ringing on their desks? Create an "Official Unattended Ringing Phone Holding Pen". In a past office, I got a cardboard box and stuck an old towel inside. We placed it in a location away from most people. Whenever a phone was ringing off the hook and the owner wasn't around, we'd put the ...


51

How can he deal with this issue without looking unprofessional? If your friend's job requires him to take many calls during the shift (as you seem to indicate) then this situation is something that is impeding him from fulfilling his responsibilities. Seems to be also a valid medical condition. Speaking softly is hardly unprofessional, but a job that ...


50

Most of the time, the nicest way is to be straightforward. If this happens in middle of a running conversation, just say: Excuse me if you got confused by the tone of the voice, but I'm Mr. X here, not miss X. Another way, lead the conversation by saying: "Hello, Mr.X here / speaking" include the salutation on purpose so as to leave no room for ...


44

How do I politely solve this? This person is just trying to show they are engaged with the call. They don't realize they are causing an issue. I suggest you try something like this: "Ok, from now on, we are going to alter the call a bit. Please keep all comments until the end." The other approach you could take is to have everyone mute their line until ...


40

The purpose of a phone interview is to weed out people who are clearly unsuited to a position, usually because their resume is very exaggerated or they are very poor communicators. As such that means the cost of someone passing a phone interview and move on to the next round is fairly low - it's the cost of doing the interviews. So don't worry about the ...


37

Just block them if you can. It is a bit rude, but so is ringing your personal number after hours. There is no need to tell them you're blocking them. I have several clients who can ring me any time. Anyone who rings that isn't on that select list, I don't even answer.


32

Simply put, you don't need a "strategy", you need a consistent "rule of engagement"... and you have to make that rule known to all callers immediately, briefly and politely. Discuss with your boss what to say when someone calls. When the caller requests to speak to the manager, you won't say "I'm sorry", or "they're not available". This make things awkward ...


32

Talk to your manager about it. Tell him/her that you have been answering the phone in the secretary's absence out of convenience for the company, but you feel that it is interfering with your other work and you want to know what you should do about it. Ask if they want you to continue answering the phone. You will get one of two answers: Yes, keep doing it. ...


32

I also had this problem when I first started working for an international company where I had colleagues around the globe. Like you, I was struggling to acclimate to specific accents (some rather heavy) that I had little exposure to before. I had a "lightbulb moment", though, when one of my office mates visited an overseas office. When he joined in on the ...


31

I had a similar situation recently and I sent this back via email after about 30 minutes of waiting for a phone call: It looks like this time did not end up working. Is there another time which would work this week? You don't want to be accusational. You have no idea why the interviewer didn't call. Maybe something urgent came up at work (you aren't an ...


31

This needs professional help. However, you also need to address this at work while you get the help. First, your boss needs to know you have a phobia if it is affecting your performance. He also needs to know that you are getting treatment for it and that he may need to make accommodations during that treatment. This may also involve HR depending on the ...


30

Basically I'm trying to remove confusion in terms of when people call up and ask for "John", and people emailing us and getting addresses mixed up. It seems like you are more confused than him. If he is not unhappy with the situation I don't see the problem. If he uses "scott@[domain].com" it has the advantage of being very different than John & Johns ...


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