Hot answers tagged

174

Unfortunately, there's no shortcut, it really is a matter of getting familiar with Indian accent, speed, and inflections. These can be very challenging. That said there are some things that will help. If your company hasn't invested in good conference-call/phone equipment, they should, this is exactly what that stuff is designed for! Use a really good ...


146

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


112

Communicate with them via email. That also has the advantage that you can review their emails later in case you forget something. It also helps with the timezone difference.


97

Depending on the laws in your area, a misstatement could result in liability on the doctor. Having a script to go by is not unusual, as some information may need to be restricted, or not disclosed for legal, or insurance reasons. Again, this varies. If the laws regarding medical information in your locale are NOT strict, then this is micromanaging, but ...


84

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


62

I think that being unable to take a phone call is going to be so unusual to a recruiter (or a prospective employer) that unless you can give a good reason they'll just perceive you as "awkward" and pass over your application. The best reason is usually the truth, e.g. My location has no cell/data coverage and I only have limited web access. I can call ...


50

Most of the time, the nicest way is to be straightforward. If this happens in middle of a running conversation, just say: Excuse me if you got confused by the tone of the voice, but I'm Mr. X here, not miss X. Another way, lead the conversation by saying: "Hello, Mr.X here / speaking" include the salutation on purpose so as to leave no room for ...


32

I also had this problem when I first started working for an international company where I had colleagues around the globe. Like you, I was struggling to acclimate to specific accents (some rather heavy) that I had little exposure to before. I had a "lightbulb moment", though, when one of my office mates visited an overseas office. When he joined in on the ...


29

Is video chat an option? I have found that in some cases I can understand foreign speakers in a face-to-face conversation, but not as well in a phone conversation. Being able to see the person's mouth and take clues from their body language can be quite helpful in decoding what might sound indecipherable with only audio.


28

I'm trans so I have special experience here, I guess... Whenever I get misgendered I have three options: 1) Say nothing. 2) Immediately correct them. 3) Correct them if they continue to do it. You have to figure out how much it bothers you. Usually if I'm say... talking to a vendor that I'll never speak with again, I just ignore it. It's not worth the ...


27

Please note that eliminating the possibility of a phone call will cause some recruiters to refuse to work with you and will cause all sorts of problems with others that would make them less helpful for you. That being said, if you want to communicate your no phone policy then you need to do so in your initial communication and do so definitively. Say ...


24

The doctor is usually directly responsible for the surgery/clinic/service. This extends to all patient interactions with the service including letters received and phone interactions. As Richard U mentions this means that they may be liable for errors. Even if they aren't directly liable, doctors are trained to take pride in their patient care and to be ...


22

Here's another way to get more familiar with the accent: Ask the colleagues to recommend some English-language podcasts (with Indian hosts), and start listening to them. Because the podcast hosts are probably deliberately speaking a little more slowly and clearly than they might in actual conversation, they first are good training wheels to understand the ...


21

You do need to learn to understand the dialect of English that most of your colleagues speak, and that is used in meetings. Anything else, such as supplementing meetings with e-mail, will be a workaround that will limit your progress. Indian speakers seem to me to talk very fast, so it may help to ask them to slow down, rather than just repeat what they ...


18

YMMV, but I've always found that when I talk to people with accents and explain to them that their accent makes it hard for me to understand, they're usually accepting of that, rather than angry. Simply bring up the subject like, Hey guys, sorry but I'm having a lot of trouble understanding what you say to me because of the difference in accent. I'm ...


14

We were a team working out of India and were facing similar issues with a sister team in Taiwan. What helped us was a 15 day visit to Taiwan. I found that having spent some time talking to them face to face in the same room gave me a lot of clarity regarding their intent and content despite having trouble understanding the accent. Once we were back to ...


12

It’s obviously not their fault... Are you sure about that? If I'm speaking English to a non-native speaker, and I talk quickly, using idioms and jargon, isn't it really my fault? In that case it's perfectly appropriate for the non-native speaker to ask me to repeat myself until I say it in a form they can understand. I'm not saying your co-workers are ...


7

Another tip (although unsure how practical this would be with India): Try to use a land line, or at least an audio connection that does not compress the audio in any way. I once worked with someone in the U.S. who was crystal clear over a land line, but unintelligible over any lossy cell or VoIP codec.


7

It might help to phrase things as follows: I regret that I am not reachable by telephone, however I would be happy to travel to answer any questions you may have in person. First, you present the issue with phone calls as part of your situation. If you say that you are "unavailable" for a phone interview, many people will think "well, make yourself ...


7

You have been ghosted. Move on and never use that recruiter again. It happens from time to time. It has happened to me. Apply for another job.


6

I have found that using screenshare feature from softwares like anydesk, teamviewer, etc helps a lot if you need to discuss work on either of your computers. Just a suggestion may not be applicable all the times but it helps.


6

When I had interviews or applied for jobs, my rule was that if I didn't hear back in two weeks, I followed up once, and if I didn't hear from them after that, I moved on. If they had every intention of interviewing you and had other issues (interview for other person ran longer, forgotten the time, miscommunication), they would have called back and said, "...


6

I'm assuming here that these are one-time failures by people you don't know to correctly identify you, and not coworkers calling you incorrectly on a repeated basis or with intentional rudeness. For one-off mistakes, an immediate, quick, but casual correction is usually effective. Try not to dwell on it, and if the caller apologizes, make your response ...


5

This is normal for customer service jobs. Call centers mandates their employees to read scripts and it's part of their performance review.


5

What no answer seems to be talking about is with communication, context is key. If you don't understand what they are working on, in a broad sense, you will struggle to make sense of it. If you generally understand their tasks, you can miss a few words, and you'll be able to figure out what they are saying. Before the meeting, you should take a browse ...


5

Tell them to speak slower. This helped in my place. Since the Indians with which I work, some are talking quite fast and they even eat vowels.


5

If I used my personal cell phone to conduct business for my employer and they pay partial for the bill can they keep my phone upon termination? If you want to know the legal aspects perhaps it would be better if you consult a lawyer (and mention your location as well). Now, in practical terms seems to me that they can't or shouldn't. You say you use your ...


5

Yes. Many companies will let you transfer the number back out, but if you transfer it to a company plan, then it's their number.


4

Other answers already stated that you need to use high-quality gear and infrastructure. Of course, that's the first thing to do. Makes life a lot easier. I want to talk about a different aspect. You are kind of learning a new language. Thus at the end of the day, it is just a matter of training. Just do the following. Choose your favourite "accent-...


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