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If you want to get better the best thing you can do is get realistic practice. One way I've done that is by getting involved in the board game Diplomacy (both online and in tournaments). At first you're likely to wonder what a game could possibly have to do with office politics so I'll explain further: You have seven players - each round secret ...


6

Politics isn't just about dirty, Machiavellian tricks. In fact that's a minority of it. It's about making friends and talking about your ideas, finding out what people want (and don't want) and looking for solutions where everyone wins. If you trick or pressure someone into doing something they don't like once, they'll never help you again, and everyone ...


1

My advice- do your job and document, documents, document. Save emails. Verify projects and expectations by email. Document successes. If your project fails, take your share of the responsibility. I can’t help on networking and alliances. Make friends. Watch their back, do them favors be reliable and hope they reciprocate.


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is such a model the standard for big companies No. There is no standard for big companies. Big companies deal with teams in many varied ways. You seem to be conflating a number of issues regarding hiring "lieutenants" and "laggards" and "validating bad performers" and "team effort". And you seem to believe that a team of talented individuals always ...


3

There are multiple strategies which range from ruthless hiring and firing, to micromanaging and anything in between. No one size fits all works with humans. The best strategies to my mind are those that in broad strokes reward on several levels, not just for production, but also for work ethic and other useful traits. As far as performers go the bigger the ...


6

a manager brings in lieutenants who might or might not be talented and productive. These lieutenants are positioned strategically to reinforce the manager's power. This to me is indicative of a terrible workplace. If your managers are hiring people to reinforce their own little fiefdom rather than for the good of the company, they are terrible managers and ...


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I have seen this happen. On top of my mind, I can think of two possible scenarios: No one else is interested in giving an update. Some people are happy that someone else is doing the updates for you and they don't have to speak up. In this case, one of the senior person has been asked or taken upon himself to give updates for the entire team. The person ...


2

You have not articulated what the actual problem is here. This person was on the project 6 months before you. Management are going through them to get updates. This was probably the case before you arrived. It is irrelevant that you have the same amount of experience. Experience is not the sole characteristic when used to decide who takes on reporting ...


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Its a tricky situation. Go back to Boss A and get the your production access revoked. Since you have moved the teams, there is no reason you should have access. This is a breach in many companies - i.e. credentials should only be with you if you are in that role. Same goes for code access for the previous app. If its needed for your job, a new formal ...


2

Follow your immediate boss' instructions but: - Document everything. While following the instructions make it blatantly obvious that you're only following instructions, not making decisions. In other words stay out of the politics. If/when it comes to bite you, you have all your documentation because you wrote everything down. Also, be prepared to ...


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