20

As far as I can tell, keeping (let alone sharing) source code from a previous employer is illegal, and you can get in big trouble for that. In fact most contracts of employment are well rigged against theft of intellectual property, and once you've signed such a contract, then you're screwed big time if you are caught violating it. I'm not sure whether this ...


19

In my case, I'm not even allowed to show my code, because it belongs to my company, so that's not an option at all for me. However, the following could be: Indicate your years experience This does not necessarily say something about your coding skills, but it does say something about management, decision making skills, ability to work with other people, ...


18

This is not a red flag. In my years as a consultant, some companies ask for confidentiality in this area, and others don't. On your resume, you can list this as Confidential Client and describe it as a Confidential Project. If the project is interesting to you, and you agree on payment terms, I would have no reservations with this arrangement. ( No ...


17

Let's cut to the chase Can employers reject me from a job based on a project like this? Yes they can. Providing database services for marijuana users is not a protected category, and if employers want to reject you based on that information then can without legal problems. Whether they will or not is something we can't answer. A substantial number of ...


16

Why describe the level of proficiency in a skill by using percentages? This allows for lazy decision making by people doing initial screening. Remember that numbers are magical to some people so they believe that PHP=40% is better than PHP=30% even if those numbers are arbitrarily self assigned.


15

You have misunderstood what somebody meant by dream. It is okay to put a career objective in your resume. The best career objective is one that aligns to the needs of the business you are applying for. There are probably a very small number of jobs where learning to speak four languages is a useful career objective to put on your resume. If you do put a ...


15

The short answer to your question is "Yes". Now for the longer answer. You are an entry level developer. What you think of as "decent" today will change, radically. What you think of as a large program will change. What you think of every aspect of everything about what being a developer is all about, will change. So, you need to alter your perception ...


14

When I fill in my resume / portfolio I include all of the relevant work I've done. As a general rule of thumb the company will care more about the technical experience you gained from that endeavor than they will about the success of the project. There can be any number of reasons for a failed project, lack of funding, client is bought out. Client no ...


13

Yes. Interviewers will be interested in what kind of work you have done before (whether for a programming job or more generally). If you are the sort of person who gets a bit nervous at an interview, and might forget to mention something in the heat of the moment, a portfolio provides you with a handy reminder of what work you have done, to talk about. ...


13

Unless you have signed a non-disclosure agreement, or something similar like a temporary or conditional employment agreement (rare), work performed as part of your interview process is yours. You should not feel guilty for using your own work in your own portfolio. At our company, we use a standard problem which is provided ahead of time and turned in ...


12

Unless you are a web designer and prospective employers want to see samples of your design ability, you aren't likely to be asked for code samples or a portfolio of web pages. I've been to a lot of interviews and although often the better interviews ask you to write code for them on the spot, they don't ask about what you've already done except in general ...


11

I've been hiring for software developers for 10+ years, and I'll put it this way: It was never needed but it certainly helps. I don't expect anyone to necessarily have a GitHub account and active portfolio worth looking at. I do expect every candidate to give me enough information in their resume to quickly and accurately vet them. And to realize that ...


10

The largest problem of showing your political views in a professional environment is that it is unprofessional. If you have the choice, avoid any correlation between politics and your work. Those sympathizing with the relevant person/ideology will be only a little bit more friendly to you. While it will be a red flag for those opposing it. If you are ...


10

I don't think you should, it's a private communication between yourself and the company. There are a number of reasons why they wont like you publicising that information. Also this could worry a future employer if they see you have published that type of information about your last company. If you need/want a recommendation/reference, then email the ...


9

There is a lot of risk and minimal gain associated with including a picture which is "funny" like this on your professional CV/about pages. Keep in mind what is funny to you might not be funny to others. Your sense of humor and what you find utterly brilliant might come across totally different to those reviewing your professional website. At best, people ...


9

I've personally never applied for a job where they didn't ask for both. I've even seen a couple where they initially only asked for a portfolio and the CV came during the second interaction. -- Summer's comment From a simple Human Resources management perspective, they may need them both to be separated to handle your process. For example, their system may ...


8

Consider what this app says about you. Good: Can develop apps Has database skills Can ship a software product Bad: Is very likely a recreational drug user, so might come to work stoned If not a recreational drug user, at least very openly pro-legalization, which might not fit into our company culture Might be involved in illegal activity and get ...


8

I understand you need to be able to make ends meet, but that kind of freelance work is unethical, and you clearly know it. Whether a company cares or not will vary from company to company. Many companies will care very deeply. It's a bright red flag that you are willing to do something unethical if you see sufficient personal benefit. As a hiring manager, ...


8

I’m a decent coder, can I get a job without having job experience or internships? Yes you can, as we all did at some point when we were seeking to land our first job. Try to be realistic. Apply for junior roles, which are the ones you have more chances of getting hired in. Then, when you start gaining work experience and hands-on experience, it will be ...


7

This should be implicitly obvious when you state that between June 2013 and March 2015, you worked at company A, and pushed code to repo B. Anyone who reads this will understand that any changes made since March 2015 is not yours. I assume, given the nature of the question, that the Git/SVN/BitBucket/whatever repositories are OpenSource. In that sense, it ...


7

Write it in view of the end audience you desire. If you think this is people who would like it academic style, then do it that way. Your boss is not the end audience in view of your question. Don't underestimate your boss, by all means summarise in plain language, but don't assume he can't understand. I left school at 14 but have no trouble following theory ...


7

If it shows your enthusiasm for software development and demonstrates that you can write clean code, keep it. Be happy when a firm doesn't hire you because they didn't think games were good portfolio projects. They aren't the kinds of places you want to work if you're moving because your current position is uninteresting. My employer builds enterprise ...


6

I don't think it's a bad thing if you highlight the new skills and techniques you learned and how your experience on the project will benefit potential future employers. For instance, I worked on a .NET project, with fairly complex requirements, and it was built in a very short time frame. I left the organization before it was completed. I have no idea ...


6

You should replace the personally identifiable information in the document with sample information. There should always be a note available (either at the end of the document or attached separately with a post-it) indicating that client information was removed as a courtesy. Even if you have permission I would do this, simply because a potential interviewer ...


6

Answering from the perspective of a hiring manager who hires both UX and UI designers and developers, I can tell you that I always notice when someone uses a cookie-cutter template for the overall online portfolio design. However, this does not always bother me or automatically negate a candidate in my mind. If you are marketing yourself as a UX architect ...


6

In brief and in blunt, I would say: typically, don't present it don't try to convince a potential employer if they've not asked for a portfolio definitely don't ignore an employer simply because they won't view your portfolio. If I were interviewing you as a programmer, I wouldn't want to see your portfolio either. (Offtopic but related note: I would ...


6

I wouldn't do anything different from what you're doing now. Just mention that your code is on GitHub and add the URL to your profile, https://github.com/yourname. Then let them do the rest. A large code base means that you've been coding a lot, which is good. Let the technical hiring manager decide which part of your code they want to read. Usually a small ...


6

I would like to ask my current manager if I can display some of my work on my portfolio - that is, some of my successful projects that I've done at work. Is this appropriate even though I'm not looking for another job? How would I go about addressing this with management so that they don't get the wrong idea? Is it advisable to tell them ...


5

First of all, if you want to show your developer skills then build something useful and show that to the world. This shows if you can actually ship something which is a very important skill to show. Just having the code mean that your audience needs to build it, configure it, deploy it, and first then be able to see what you can do. Why make them do ...


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