256

Not when it puts you at a disadvantage that could easily be avoided. The space in your office should be used in the best way to give everyone the best desk space possible. If the current layout doesn't do that, and there is no reason not to change it, then you change it. If she insists that nothing gets moved then obviously you insist on the window desk. (...


43

No, you shouldn't Depending on the local/company culture sometimes seniority (in the sense of length of service at the company) can justifiably earn you some level of deference or "perks" but simply being older should not (nor should someone be treated worse because they are older). While it might be tempting to give in to her position "just this once" I ...


36

I'm getting sense from "Therefore I got a little furious and told her that either she'll sit there or we will rearrange the desks completely - at which she told me that I'm rude" that she heard some angry demands and responded with angry demands. Essentially, she fought fire with fire, and now you're both burnt. My general rule is if I tell someone to do ...


23

As Loofer has answered, you can ask, but I'd be pretty amazed if any employer would say "yes" to a request like this. As far as I can see, it's a lose-lose situation for the employer: they've got to back fill your role for three months, which is going to cost time and money, and what happens after that: You decide to leave. The employer's gained nothing. ...


17

It is quite normal to be worried that a change in job might not work out as it seems. There is a risk that your decision is not the best one. Also, there is another risk that staying in your current position is not the best choice for you. It is not normal to expect your current employer to cover those risks for you. I have not heard of any employer ...


17

Absolutely! Many managers will create job descriptions for roles on their team which reflects the perfect candidate. What they actually get is about half of what they want. So, if you like the position, and are technically qualified, send a resume, follow up, and let your positive exuberance be the reason you get the job.


14

The way you approach any situation depends on your goals. I´ve passed my first interview, and there are two left. I assume once I pass the two remaining ones HR will call me and make me an offer. Do I have to answer instantaneously? No, you don't have to answer instantaneously. In fact, if a potential employer insisted on an answer to a question of ...


11

If both of your employers are getting what they pay you for then I don't see a problem ethically. In future job interviews just talk about the experience that's relevant to the post applied for.


11

You said at the same time, for the same position so age is completely out of the matter here: if you were an apprentice (as she said) and she weren't, then you you wouldn't be in the same position (as you said). So my suggestion is to stand your ground. If both of you can not stay next to the window, try to make it so that none of you stay next to the ...


9

I grew up poor and dropped out of school, doing my uni as an adult. I now own my own business but still feel that I'm charging ridiculous sums and getting paid insane amounts. So I don't think you ever lose it although I'm comfortable with it now. My way of dealing with it was two fold, firstly I decided that even though it's an absolute ripoff I can ...


9

so to answer your first question first - if you're going to continue in the realm of software engineering, you don't need to put your security guard experience on your resume. It's not relevant and even if you weren't doing these two jobs at the same time, it would seem silly to bring it up. As far as I know, there's no laws against pulling two full time ...


8

I don't know what part of the world you're in as you do not say, so can only offer guidance based on my knowledge of UK employment law. As it stands I highly doubt this would be accepted by your employer, unless you're a genius in your field! However, I think what you're after is known as a Sabbatical What is a sabbatical? A sabbatical is a more ...


8

Yes, it is ethical to ask to be considered. Worst case scenario is they say no. Best case scenario you get a new job. Generally, asking is not a problem. Ethical problems only (potentially) come if you don't accept their answer.


7

The corporation offering the job are probably best placed to judge the job title. A job title will normally bear a direct relation to the level of responsibility. Have you looked at the job description? Do the tasks and responsibilities look congruent with what a 'Principal' or 'Senior' engineer would do? If the job title seems a 'step back' then the ...


7

Generally a leave of absence or sabbatical is granted when you will be performing a task that isn't a conflict of interest. They generally fall into one of several categories: Medical school military religious (to go on a mission) specialized training during that time you may or may not be earning money from another source. What benefits you will have ...


7

Most positions have "paths" which allow career progression - and help distinguish increasing responsibilities and abilities. Typically this is a combination of industry standard as well as company specific (it's in the interest of everyone to have roughly similar responsibilities associated with titles). So when comparing Director vs Senior Director there ...


7

You're being unreasonable. Three months is a very short time to wait before asking; usually raises occur once a year at most.


6

It's always seemed to me that the difference between manager and director is approximately equivalent to the difference between the words "manage" and "direct". A manager has a team and a goal, and leads the team to the goal. The manager manages the resources (human and otherwise) to achieve the desired outcome. A director is usually higher-ranking than a ...


6

You need to consider both points of view. As others already mentioned that the employer will have an "empty" seat for your position. This isn't a big deal if you work for a large company and there are several people that perform your job function. However if you work for a small company and you are the ONLY person that can do the task then you may want to ...


6

My suggestion is to have a meeting with your manager, or whoever made the decision to move you, and tell them exactly what you have stated above. Make sure to highlight why you feel that you would better help the company by being a software developer, not you, because whoever made this decision made it because they feel you would have been better for the ...


6

What is Software Engineer III for this company? Do you know? Job titles are not some universal standard from some sanctioning body. They are an HR construct to manage the organization and each organization does its own thing. Maybe they only have three levels that equate to junior, senior and principal, but they use numbers instead of different names to ...


6

If the company is your current employer (and maybe even your previous one before that) - I would say it is absolutely necessary, since you will be using these as references. Further back - I guess it becomes a matter of style. As a manager who hires, my first reaction to your question was "yes, all the way down". I'm still not sure it's a great idea to ...


6

For a faculty position at a university, a permanent line means that the funding for the position is guaranteed. Note, however, your position is not guaranteed because you are not tenured.


6

It might help if you clarify which jurisdiction you are in. However, in general your employer can ask you to do whatever needs to be done - they are not restricted to just what was in your job description. Certainly, in most jurisdictions, it would not be illegal for your employer to request this. As you say in the question, many people have been leaving ...


6

Your resume should only contain skills an experience up until the present. While you may have accepted a position, there is no guarantee that from today until your start date that something doesn't change causing you to no longer start at that position. Also, even if nothing were to change and you start the position as planned, it is useless to have it on ...


5

Please tell us the exact years of experience required. Half or percentage does not give an accurate picture. Eg. Job = 2, you = 1. No problem you can try. Job = 10 years, you = 5. Maybe don't apply. If its the former case, then I suggest that you request the employer to consider you for the job. I'd say it like this in my cover letter: Sir, I am ...


5

Ask your current boss what you can and can't say about the job. You don't have to say you're asking for CV purposes; this is something you should know before describing your job to anyone, including friends, relatives, the guy or gal you're trying to chat up at the party.. Or even with coworkers when you're someplace where non-employees could overhear the ...


4

In the United States a lot of companies will call someone a 'director of Grommits' if several Grommit team managers report to him. This really isn't the best practice unless the 'director' is in fact, a member of the Board of Directors. In the US calling someone a 'director' who is not a BOD member will create an ambiguity with the legal concept of '...


4

If you are banking on company B raising the ante after company A makes a counteroffer, you may find yourself working for neither. Consider this scenario: You receive an offer from company B You run to company A with the news, hoping that company A will meet or exceed company B's offer, and it does -- but not for the reasons you're thinking of You return to ...


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