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264

This of course could place the company under serious fire for invading users' privacy when we get found out. In fact, as far as my country's laws go, it not only illegal, it is unconstitutional. You're being asked to break the law and do things that might land you in prison or otherwise in serious trouble. This argument fell on my CEO's deaf ears, ...


244

Do not give anybody your password. If they lack the resources to do their work then they have to take this up with their superiors. The problem is not primarily your privacy (although this surely is unpleasant), the problem is that your colleagues can use your credentials to impersonate you, send e-mails in your name, maybe access files or resources they ...


179

If you built these tools at the office, and against existing corporate systems, then they belong to the company. Accept that. You are worried about getting "credit," which tells me you're part of the toxicity problem, albeit probably a secondary part, and not a "source" of toxicity. If you're worried about "credit," make a department-wide announcement ...


164

He should have access to the computer, but not the accounts. From your description, he specifically wants access to the accounts to act in your name. This should violate your IT department's policies for two reasons. His actions will trace back to you. Your actions trace back to him. This muddies the water and should concern him, not you. Downloading ...


161

Since your boss doesn't care that this is incredibly invasive, warn him that starting on Android Q, to be released later this year, Android will (finally) block apps from recording video and sound while not in the foreground. Therefore, it will be the same situation you have with iOS. Of course it will take sometime until Android Q has a significant ...


151

Would it be ethical for me to read the document in my name? I understand it'd generally be considered an integrity violation to read the emails and other documents of others. That's not what I'm doing -- or is it? It's obviously not your document, so of course you would be reading the documents of others without their permission. While you might ...


145

You should not share this with people because A) you can't be sure it's her and B) you can't be sure if she wants you to share this with the company. What you can do, is contact her over this service and tell her people at the company are worried about her. You might even urge her to contact the company herself to tell them they needn't be concerned and/or ...


143

Your corporate email account doesn't belong to you, it's not confidential to you - it belongs to the business. You need to allow access to that mailbox after you leave so that the business can look to see if there's any emails that are valuable or have information that isn't anywhere else. Normally, a forwarding system will be enabled so that any future ...


142

When people are talking to you, while looking at your screen, that means they're being distracted (and that means they're taking more of your time than neccesary, too) You can simply lock your machine (default short-cut is Windows-L on most systems), turn your chair to face at them, optionally even stand up and otherwise give them your undivided attention. ...


132

Document everything, starting now. You will likely need it. Do not start building this feature. Do not prioritize it, do not write tickets for it, do not task your team with anything to do with it. If management wants to chastise you over dereliction of duty, allow them to do so, and simply ignore everything they say. Document these situations as well. Go ...


122

I'm going to go against the grain here. I'm probably wrong based on all the other answers and I'm looking forward to learning something from your comments. I'm also in the USA. I think this is no big deal and you shouldn't push back. Your colleague is a developer for the retail site. He could easily be monitoring the transactions and you jumped out as a ...


101

I'd like to give an alternative answer, because it's the first thing that popped into my head when I read the post: Was the document on the desktop of the computer? Or otherwise in some place you were meant to see? Does the owner of the laptop know that you personally would be doing the hard drive replacement? These questions are important because the ...


100

If you don't agree with what the company is doing ethically, then you should probably quit asap. If you think they are doing something illegal or in breach of regulations, then you may want to consider reporting them to the relevant authorities.


90

Can I refuse to give them my password? Given that this is Germany, I would be very surprised if you wouldn't be required to refuse. Every single German working contract I have seen contained a paragraph about never under any circumstances giving out your credentials to the company's systems. To anybody. So go back home, check your contract to make sure it'...


83

I cleaned my computer, but I didn't clean my network folder Is this coworker out of place asking for that information? They are not out of line for needing to access whatever was left in your network folder. But there's no need to hand over your password to give them what they really need. How can I professionally decline his request? No need to ...


76

What I do in such situations. (had a situation where my employer did not want to buy some licenses of software we used commercially) Step one: Make sure I get my facts straight and have evidence of my claim. Step two: Make management aware of the Problem. Leave a paper-trail of doing so. Assume no malice and make no accusations. Just describe the Problem ...


73

I don't see any issues here - the network admins have discovered a risk (high bandwidth usage), identified who it belongs to (easy if the computer name gives it away), or alternatively have identified the AP consuming the traffic, traced it back to an IP address, and realised it was you. Nothing here is in breach of the GDPR. They don't have data on you, ...


70

Check your IT policy, most places have a rule that this is not ok, ever. Two things to think about: if you were discussing a complaint about your boss with HR, they would be able to find out. if your boss has access to you machine and breaks something, it will appear to have been you that did it. In every place I have ever worked, this behaviour is ...


69

We just got a survey about the noise level at work and there is also the question if we have any other problems at work and I would like to post it there. Do you think this would be the right place to name my issue? Yes, this is the perfect place to do this. I am not sure what your company can do about it except make a request to the building owners. ...


69

They're on the ceiling overlooking the stalls so you can see into them. So they're overlooking the stalls even when the stalls are closed? The law in Washington seems pretty clear-cut to me. https://www.washemploymentlaw.com/employee-rights/workplace-surveillance#1 I would call the police. Don't call 911. It's not an emergency. But find out what the ...


67

This is a common problem, and there is a common solution: Write something. Make up a fake company in your head. Find a business problem it needs solved with software, and solve it. Show them that code. Explain your NDA's and confidential information. No one is looking for company secrets. They are looking to see how you organize your thoughts in ...


65

You are the project manager. If your only way to keep your project on schedule is to play the childish game of confiscating something like car keys then you've got bigger problems than someone going through your desk to retrieve their own property. If I was asked this by a project manager my response would be "f**k no". I'd then be talking to my ...


64

Since it seems that your CEO is either a bit clueless (at best) or morally bankrupt I don't think you're going to get anywhere with persuading them that this is abhorrent. Especially given they are just casually brushing off such fripperies as it being rather illegal. What you might have some success with is point out some of the myriad ways that this could ...


62

I would always operate that what you do at work and with work items (computers, etc) is always 100% known by your employer. Is this a common practice, and is this something I should address my employer about? Most places don't actively investigate these sorts of issues until there is reason to suspect foul play. For example, if you have to badge in/out, ...


61

This is indeed a bizarre request. Unless the job you will be doing requires some sort of health-related qualification (such as lifting 75-pound boxes or being free of tuberculosis) they don't have any need for your medical records. They might also need access to your records if you will be working in a remote location (an offshore drilling rig or ...


53

In general, is it normal to have stand-up meetings in the open or should they be held in a closed meeting room? There's two sides to it. a) The stand-up meeting is open to guests. That's part of the transparency. Anyone could come in and hear your project and your status. b) Holding your stand-up so other teams are basically forced to attend due to ...


52

Aside from the above excellent and correct answers, can you get away with asking the mildly snarky question 'So .. out of wild curiosity, I noticed that your hard drive has a file with my name on it, which I did not open. What's in it??' Then don't say a word, and don't give the impression that you opened the file.


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