New answers tagged

7

If you needed some government security clearance, then an awful lot of question would be asked, your family and maybe your friends would be asked, but your employer would not hear anything about anything you say, except at the end whether you got clearance or not. So your employer asking for that kind of information is a very, very dark crimson red flag. ...


5

all employees complete a security related interview involving personal questions such as if we have any issues in our marriage, if we have any problems with car/house loans etc., If we have problems with alcohol or drugs outside of work and other personal questions. These questions generally fall into security clearance type questions for government jobs. ...


22

They can ask but you have every right to tell them to shove it. This isn't normal in any shape or form, the sorts of questions you are talking about do get looked into to one degree or another when you're going through some of the more rigorous security clearances and while I've had third parties require clearances to work with them before you don't provide ...


2

I can't stand extremely sensitive information being sent to a regime I don't personally like. What should I do, if anything, about this? You say that you can't stand it, but so far you have. If the regime bothers you enough, you should find a new job and leave this one. Before you decide to look elsewhere, you might wish to make sure that the ...


6

If it was a data transfer from EU to China, there are rules (https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/international-dimension-data-protection_en) that need to be followed. I assume that similar rules apply for US to China data transfers, but some legal expertise is required to understand if those data transfers are protected by “Privacy ...


-2

This isn't your issue to resolve. If they're handling sensitive data there are mandated procedures legislated to do it by. And it would be audited regularly. If you don't trust the auditors, your company and the authorities then you should look at moving on. If you have ambitions of crashing your career and other risks including perhaps doing it all for ...


12

Interpreting privacy policies is not trivial, so keep an open mind that you might be wrong. At the same time, don't assume malice immediately - they might be willing to address the situation. First stop should be your immediate manager. Share your concern with this person and see what they say. If you are not satisfied with their answers even after ...


0

Cameras pointed into bathrooms stalls is extreme prison-like surveillance. Utterly unacceptable in every imaginable workplace, let alone the USA. Most likely it's a creep Sysadmin and not any sane manager's idea of a policy. The police definitely need to be called at some point. But it might be helpful to gather several employees including higher level ones,...


0

Management, HR and sysadmin are definitely poor choices to start. I'm not from the U.S. and I don't know in which field it is, but if you feel uncomfortable going directly to the police, talking to a union representative in the company is surely a good option. They might know if a similar issue has been raised and already addressed in the past and, in case ...


69

They're on the ceiling overlooking the stalls so you can see into them. So they're overlooking the stalls even when the stalls are closed? The law in Washington seems pretty clear-cut to me. https://www.washemploymentlaw.com/employee-rights/workplace-surveillance#1 I would call the police. Don't call 911. It's not an emergency. But find out what the ...


29

You need to consult a lawyer and then the police. While I am not a lawyer, a quick Google search would HIGHLY indicate this is illegal. Putting a camera in a bathroom violates a person's reasonable expectation of privacy. Read this article from a lawyer in Washington state for more information. Its probable one or more persons will be facing fines, ...


-23

Inform your manager and move forwards from the response. This is illegal most workplaces unless perhaps there is full disclosure or it's some sort of porn business perhaps. But you cannot ignore it now, you're on camera peering into mensroom air vents. In terms of your options stated. 1) No, this isn't your role and you need to have your back covered. 2) ...


1

I occupy this quadrant: Yes, this is unethical and a problem, but a minor one. You should treat it as if it were a minor problem (not a big one) Assuming you want to continue a friendly relationship with this person, I would not imply that you're going to get HR involved -- as "please confirm that you've read this email" would. If I got such an email from ...


4

Query what happened, and why Reading the answers presented, I notice they either suggest going in guns blazing or backing off. I would suggest instead using this as an opportunity to ask questions about how the system is run, and specifically whether he knows it's your order (E.G. 'why did you mention X amount at me?'),if he does, why he knows it's your ...


10

I'm going to suggest a course of action based on the information that you and the other developer have been forming a friendship and talk outside of work. Talk to the developer, in person or by phone call, outside of work, about this. Do not use texts, social media, and certainly not any official channel like work slack or email. Leave no paper trail that ...


3

This is definitely a data breach, violating the data protection act, and most likely illegal. I would definitely talk to a superior within a given situation like this. Make sure you log all evidence; if you want to tell a superior If not, I would speak to him outside work. I would say something along the lines of: I know exactly what you did. You used ...


1

No need to go into big detail on this answer. All you do is contact your companies Security team. They'll do the forensics on how this colleague got the information, and take any appropriate actions. He may get a stern telling off, or he may lose his job; in either case, it's his actions that have led to that, not yours.


122

I'm going to go against the grain here. I'm probably wrong based on all the other answers and I'm looking forward to learning something from your comments. I'm also in the USA. I think this is no big deal and you shouldn't push back. Your colleague is a developer for the retail site. He could easily be monitoring the transactions and you jumped out as a ...


35

If you talk to him outside of work, then you can do that and tell him a few things. What he did was a severe breach of privacy. In his position, he can be fired for breaches of privacy. If the company is caught not respecting people’s privacy it can get expensive. You are not complaining to HR this time and this time only. If you hear of other cases you ...


8

What would be the best way to handle this? Your response to this depends heavily on how much trouble you want your colleague to get into. The mild variant is to write him a strongly worded email along the lines of what Stephan's answer suggests, the key components are: What he did is not okay. You take violations of your privacy seriously Ask him to stop ...


35

Backend developer myself, I regret it's not uncommon from developers that have admin access to a database to witness private information being in it. It's also likely that because the retail site is internal, the company had/have lower security and privacy standards about it. It is possible that this developer got you in a course of debugging something and ...


32

I would send him this email using your corporate email address: If you have a script notifying you of other employee's purchases, that is not ok. And even if you don't have such a script, or if your script was for debugging purpose, your message to me was still not appropriate either way. Do you understand what I'm saying? Please respond to let ...


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