719

You did exactly what was instructed, and took scores from "barely passing" to mastery. Emphasize that. If your boss won't bend, offer to take the game down. Meanwhile, you may want to update your resume, taking scores from 68% to 96% is something that gives you HUGE bragging rights. I would also suggest seriously thinking about making educational games ...


259

You should just ask your manager what you should do, as how to specifically bill your time will depend on your company policy. Of course, you should get paid for this time. You're at work, updating a system that is required for your work. There were probably security updates, for example, that would likely be required by your IT security policies. You weren'...


221

I suggest you focus on the real problem which is that work is not being completed in a timely manner and there is a loss of quality. If you feel they have too much free time to spend here, then assign them more work and more closely monitor the progress on the work assigned. When the quality problems happen, then send it back to them to fix and give them a ...


216

In an 8 hour shift, at minimum you should take two 15 minute breaks, and a 30-60 lunch break. The 15 minute breaks are on the clock, the longer lunch break is not. Additionally, you mention in one of your comments that your job involves writing code. Programming requires mental breaks to be effective. Programming is very cerebral; it's not a job where you ...


212

While it's not immediately your fault that people are spending too much time on the game, as the developer, you could help the situation. Turn off the scoreboard server/disable the game entirely for now. Go to your boss and show the increased test scores to show what benefit it has brought. Work with them to create a middle ground where employees are still ...


186

management says employees should pay for such events Sadly your management is clueless. They are the ones who desire increasing engagement of employees. They are the ones who will have something to gain from such increased engagement. Thus any company event must be paid for by the company. I know it really boils down to willingness to participate in ...


165

I don't think you've correctly identified the problem. You weren't "too good" at your job, you simply performed a task without specific requirements. There were no guard rails. I don't think this is inherently your fault, but there are definitely steps you can take to avoid this. Focusing on your successes and trying to pass this off as something to brag ...


161

To triage while looking for a different job: start pushing back. Phrases like: "I will look into that first thing tomorrow" "I'm in the middle of something, can I get back to you in X minutes/hours?" "Can you run that request through my boss?" Learn to use them. And use them. Assuming you are planning on quitting, continue to use them to delay the day to ...


160

If you want to burn out a potential good employee then go ahead and be "ambitious". Don't be surprised if they resign or are ineffective due to burnout.


131

Sometimes I just can't get anything done. Sure, I come into the office, putter around, check my email every ten seconds, read the web, even do a few brainless tasks like paying the American Express bill. But getting back into the flow of writing code just doesn't happen. These bouts of unproductiveness usually last for a day or two. But there have ...


130

It seems like a dreadful idea. Here's a few things that will happen, in addition to your developers and testers starting to hate each other and yourself for introducing this: Everyone will focus on low hanging fruit. This means that QA will start reporting all sorts of stuff that's actually fine but might be construed to be "buggy" in hopes of getting paid, ...


126

Always use your vacation. Your boss not using his is idiotic. Most people who don't take vacation are actually scared that things might run more smoothly with them out. Take yours. Definitely don't set a precedent on not taking even some. It is your benefit and no one other than your boss will even notice that you worked through your vacation times. To ...


125

Professional team-building is more than a few co-workers having a good time together. It is designed with specific goals in mind. The event might encourage people from different departments to mingle and talk socially, before they are expected to work together professionally. If people are left to their own devices, they would mostly talk to people they ...


121

A long build cripples the entire software development process. You shouldn't accept this as a fact of life without first taking steps to reduce the build time. Here are some ways you can do that: Buy an SSD. Add more RAM. If you're developing a web app: Use browserify to hot reload your client-side code. While developing, build only the portions of the ...


119

Exactly how wrong is what I did? You took off without asking for permission, knowing that if you had asked to go home you'd have been refused. Furthermore, you told absolutely no one about your decision, leaving anyone who needs your help hanging, and with no idea of when/if you might be back. Your manager is 100% right to be upset that you simply ...


111

I read an idea for increasing productivity in a company. It went like this: Have a certain fund, that will be a bonus. Say $100,000. For each tangible bug found, the testers get paid $5 - $15. Whatever's left over at the end of the month/year goes to the Devs. It seems like a wonderful enough idea in theory, though I'm not sure how well it ...


105

Unfortunately, you don't get to decide what activities are productive and unproductive - the manager does. The manager thought you would be good for this role and allocated resources (you) according to business need. The idea is that you would be effectively doing the task you were given. With regard to timesheet, to second the comments to OP, the hours ...


101

Short answer: Just quit. Longer answer: I've been where you are and it ended very badly for me. I ended up having a stroke from all the stress at the ripe old age of 40. IF you stay where you are, one of several things are going to happen: You get fired You burn out, and THEN get fired You burn out and end up in the hospital. Management has made it ...


92

First: Welcome to this little thing I like to call "real life". Software developers are always saying that before we start a project, all the requirements should be fully nailed down, from detailed descriptions of algorithms to screen mock-ups, and once development work begins, no changes should be allowed. When the product is delivered, we will of course ...


90

The problem with this approach is that the new employee doesn't know your organisation and doesn't know that the first 90 days are considered "special" by you. What would you think if you started a new job and your workload was so big that it required you to work 11h/day? Personally, I would think the organisation doesn't know what work-life balance is, ...


79

The way to patch things up is to offer solutions for the problems that upper management, your boss, and yourself have identified with the new training. If people are spending too much time, restrict it in a way that they can still complete the training. Show your boss that you are dependable to provide solutions to problems. Also remember that there is ...


78

Friend, you have shot yourself in the foot. "Unproductive"? To whom? Once upon a time, someone had to train you. Now you're the trainer -- so was the training you received unproductive? You have painted yourself in a corner by not billing those hours, and now that it has become the expectation, you have a problem with a situation that you helped to ...


73

You need to push back. Get time on their calendars. Ask questions. Ask a lot of questions. Ask so many questions that they get tired of you and will give the detail you need. If they don't know, propose specific requirements and get sign-off. Document their answers and send the answers back to them for confirmation. That makes it clear that the cause for ...


72

A face to face meeting is required instead of mail. But in that meeting, go prepared with your achievements, what you did, what was appreciated by customers. Do NOT take this meeting on the lines "My colleagues got rewarded but I didn't". Instead of comparing with your colleagues, highlight your own points. If you start comparing, narrative switches to "...


71

Here's the bottom line: If they're using it for work, why do you care? The issue should never be "these people are doing this thing I would rather not be seeing them do". That reeks of micromanagement. The questions you really should be asking are: Are they not meeting deadlines that they were meeting before you introduced them to Stack Overflow? If this ...


70

Train yourself! Think of something you'd like to know how to do and learn it, whether that's a technical skill or a workplace process of some kind. It'll keep you engaged and make you a more valuable worker.


70

I'm adding another answer, since I disagree with the current top voted answer. That advice is correct up to and including the point that you need to apologize. You did knowingly go against implicit orders. The order to work from the office unless explicit permission is granted to work from home is entirely reasonable. Ignoring this is an insult to ...


69

What do do when my boss explicitly says he has nothing for me to do He already told you to "stay and man the phones", so that's not "nothing". You clearly must stay and you clearly must man the phones. While you are manning the phones, there is almost certainly something you could do that wouldn't cause your boss to come down hard on you. Perhaps, more ...


67

If you, personally, are not able to keep an eye on estimates and make sure they don't get ridiculous, you probably need at least one person that you do trust who can confirm. Beyond that, it's just a case of "if the work keeps rolling in, I'm happy." It is my experience that the programmers who are most productive are those who are most trusted and have the ...


65

If you truly want the developers to be back to their old level of productivity, then you need to start being more sensitive to their concerns. At the moment, you (or you company, it doesn't matter, you represent the company on this) have told a bunch of creative folks "we're taking away your favourite tools, suck it up". Instead of trying to work with the ...


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