18

If this is an actual voice call, just say: Sorry, I'm in the middle of something. Let's set up a zoom to discuss, my calendar is up to date. or Sorry, I'm busy right now. Can I call you back in an hour or so? Repeat until they get the message that you are not instantly available. If that doesn't work, stop answering the phone and just message back "...


13

Does your communication software have an option to set a "busy/unavailable" status? That might be useful to signal that you're at work but can't or don't want to handle interruptions right now. It's almost the same as being in another call, just that an interruption in this case would not disturb your conversation with your call partner(s) but your ...


10

In what degree should I push myself to learn these,... There is no predefined number which can be used here. As a tech lead, based on your responsibilities, you need to visualize the requirements, analyze the solution and (sometimes) implement it. Whatever amount of mastery you need on the technologies/domain to perform this, you need to achieve that level. ...


8

That's not easy to answer since productivity is very difficult to define. Take a look at: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/productivity-vs-annual-hours-worked This graph measures it in "dollars per hour" and as expected Europe has high productivity and low hours whereas the China and India have low productivity and high hours. That's somewhat ...


8

You shouldn't need to learn it in depth, but you need to learn it will enough to: Make important decisions about code design Recognize when code isn't robust or can cause issues. Guide your team on what frameworks to use or how to approach building a feature-set. Obviously more knowledge will be great, so I wouldn't argue you can just achieve this and then ...


7

You can simply ask them. Explain how it takes you out of your flow and ask that they send a chat message/email beforehand so you can let them know when you have time. There's nothing impolite about that. Other options are simply ignoring the call and calling back when you have time, or if possible set your availability to 'busy' or 'do not disturb'.


5

It depends. For a highly motivated workforce, striving towards a common goal which is seen as imminent, important and achievable - the productivity could even increase by working 7/16. Been there, seen it. However - this emergency/pull-through mode doesn't hold up over time. And people's ability to keep it up, will not hold up over time. So which will start ...


4

That's going to vary a lot by what job you're doing. Working consumes personal resources - physical, mental, and emotional. Time off gives you a chance to restore those resources. At the extreme on one end, if you don't have enough time off to eat and sleep, eventually it'll kill you. At the other extreme, it's not really possible to be productive if you'...


3

This can be one of the toughest things for a newly remote team to adapt to. If you were in the office, your PM (or anyone else on your team) can usually look your way or a quick walk to see if you look busy or not, but when the team is remote, that doesn't work. As a team, you need to agree on what your communication protocol will be. You all have work to ...


2

This is how i do. Lead the team from the front. You be in the front line. You create the initial project setup etc. Google. Do the work. As requirements pour in, you will know if you need additional skills. If yes. Then you pick up the usecase and implement it your self. If NO, then dont work on it. As tech lead you need to be clear on the concepts. ...


2

Focus on the business problems As a full-stack developer myself, sometimes frameworks are chosen out of "coolness" and trying to be "modern", while neglecting basic business practice of solving actual problems. Software development is complex. If your stacks do not solve any actual problems that your developers have, then you're only ...


2

Plan time for work that needs focus, then block it on your calendar. Turn your auto-reply function on. Mute your notifications. Let people know when you will be available and how to contact you if there is something that can't wait until after your focus time. It's a lot easier for you to do something to create the work environment you want than to try to ...


1

Choose your own priorities A common work-management method places activities into 4 quadrants: Calls very often fall into the Urgent (the computer is buzzing at me!) but not important. As several comments have indicated, don't answer just because it's ringing.


1

It really depends on what the business expects from you. Most of the time they just want you to solve problems regarding IT. It can be through calling the right people for domain info, sometimes to train and help colleagues, make decisions regarding architecture etc. In this case you might solve the problem, not by trying to catch up yourself but by finding ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible