15

It seems you have wasted a lot of time wondering on "if"s and "but"s and did not take a stand on your decisions. In other words, they undermined your authority and decision, because you allowed them to do so and get away with it. I'm sorry, but at times, you need to take hard decisions to ensure that the protocols are followed and the work is delivered. ...


15

Quite often you don't need a (public) portfolio as a programmer/developer. You can show where you've worked. You can talk the talk and walk the walk when it comes down to having conversations about Microsoft Dynamics AX programming. That alone tells a future employer a lot (at least, at the technical interview if a technical person is not present during ...


13

Should I let my camera on even if the person I am chatting with is not using one? Is it considered rude/unprofessional to turn off the camera? Whether you decide to interview with or without the camera, the decision should be made before the interview. Once you have started the interview, it would be inappropriate to turn off the camera regardless of ...


12

Is it legal/wise to ask for example a professor of that particular field a roadmap to solve the problem, when data has been anonymized? If not, what should a worker do? You should ask your boss, and explain to them as you did here that certain level of knowledge is required to complete the project, and what can you do to get that knowledge. You boss will ...


10

Would it be appropriate to talk to the CTO about my application? How should I bring up the topic? Most likely the CTO does not know how the current state of applications to their company is (as those are not a CTO's tasks, and are more appropriate for HR or Recruitment Manager). Thus, asking him about how your application is going may come up as out of ...


6

So I said yes to him while still looking for other opportunities. How do I tell my manager that I am no longer interested in the role that he offered me? Is there anything I could have done to be more transparent and professional? I'm assuming that you accepted the new role without saying that you would still keep looking elsewhere. Doing so ...


4

All of the other answers are good advice in general for an employee that is not following orders. However in view of you special circumstances - her being the owner's sister in law - I would talk to your boss first. Your conversation should be something like: "Hey boss, have we been told to give X any special treatment, or should we treat her like any ...


4

Yes, it's appropriate to ask about employment (politely). One reason executives come to university campuses is to promote their companies as good places to work. You can certainly mention that you like what the company's doing, and you sent in an application. Be prepared to answer the question "what do you like about us?" and have a short intelligent ...


4

While conference systems might be under-quality sometimes (we've all had these situations throughout the years), what you describe seems to be a "personal" problem. My best advice is to have a meeting with your doctor so he can recommend you the good path to proceed. At the minimum, you should have an audiogram done. You might be able to hear most of the ...


3

He is sure to be very disappointed. I am not so sure about. The job that you really wanted is not there anymore. It is normal to think about a decission even though after "accepting it". Remember what you said: which while being a okayish role, was not the "dream role" that I joined this company for. You are the one that matters here! I think it is ...


3

Part of the interview process is for people to see each other. The reason for this is so that they can judge how they answer questions, deal with surprises, verify good hygiene, know who they interviewed so they know who to expect on the first day, make sure they dressed appropriately, and more. With the recruiter having their camera off, they did you a ...


2

The CTO is not responsible for your application, except at very small companies (for example at my current company the CTO is also the hiring manager for all dev positions so he does know these things, but this is the exception not the rule). So I wouldn't ask him directly about your application in particular, because he does not know, nor does he care (he ...


2

I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders, she does not follow on this specific topic. She says she has better calling lists, which are old patients (+4 years without any purchase) and partnered elderly homes databases. You are not giving orders (a bad phrasing IMHO). You are giving her suggestion that she is free to ignore. If she is free ...


2

Say nothing until you schedule unless you trust these people incredibly If a team member quit with two weeks notice, your team would need to deal with it (and finding a replacement can easily 8-12 weeks anyway). If a team member had a heart attack and were not in the office tomorrow, your team would have to deal with it. If your team cannot handle that, ...


2

I'd like to be able to show some projects to my future employer so they can get a grasp what I can do. That is tricky. If you come with the code from home, how will the employer know that you actually created it? If the employer wants to see you writing code, then they will ask you do undergo some programming test. They would get much more valuable ...


1

The other answers concentrated on dealing with the final, visible result. I will try to go to the core of it. I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders ... As a manager, among other things, you do two things: make decisions; assign tasks; Orders are given by dictators or by people in military-like organizations. Stop giving orders, nobody ...


1

I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders, she does not follow on this specific topic. Keep a written record of your orders. Roleplay what she needs to say to those people. Stay on her until she does what you demanded. Stay in the same room, wear earplugs if you have to. Buy/rent/license some call center software/cloud solution that records and ...


1

I am hard of hearing as well. I started to lose my hearing as a young child and never had an issue until my mid 20s. I am like you where I require subtitles or closed caption to hear/understand movies. I decided to go see an audioist about my hearing and got hearing aids. It has vastly improved my overall well being. It used to be crowded rooms were hard to ...


1

What you've described is every small company I've ever worked for. Sure they didn't all have all of those problems. As I grew professionally, I learnt not to see problems and annoyances, but opportunities and was able to apply the maxim "if you touch something, make it better than it was". Now I'm working with mainly legacy stuff, fixing tedious problems ...


1

Some words: estimating; planning; prioritizing; tracking; reporting; It is quite obvious that your manager does not understand very well the stress he lays on you. So you can handle it by doing it yourself. Maintain a clear list of things you have to do. For each item, make a break-down structure (WBS) if it more complex. For each item and each element in ...


1

Based on your comment reply, you do not know the actual professor. All of these answers assume you know the professor and that you are trying to ask your boss. I feel the first step is to contact the professor to see if he is even willing to help out someone who is not taking any of his classes, possibly not even attending the college/university (assuming ...


1

It is the safest to ask your boss. BUT, you can avoid asking your boss, and still be as safe. It all depends on how you interact with the professor. Not OK: Hello professor, we are just inventing a device which ... (something), and I need your support with ... (whatever) OK: Hello professor, I am faced with a problem at work. While dealing with a ...


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