436

You were not unprofessional at all. Your boss was taking advantage of you, pure and simple. When he lost that he just got nasty and his comments reflect this. You'll encounter people like this from time to time in your professional life, it is inevitable. Move on and concentrate on your new job. Your boss is only in a salty mood because he's now faced ...


206

I would report it. Don't hide your identity, there is no point. If your company asks Slack, Slack can probably tell them who accessed that file. It's all in the logs anyway. It's just a matter of someone reading through them. Personally, I don't even understand your need for hiding your identity. You did nothing wrong. In any case, better you be the one ...


162

This is normal operating procedure. Your boss is being a jerk. Did he think you were working for fun? You are working to earn a living. When someone offers you a better living or better employment terms, you take it. That's how the working world works. You are under no obligation to ask your current employer for anything. You can if you want while you are ...


65

Absolutely not unprofessional. If your new salary is three times higher and assuming that the new company isn’t run by total idiots and that new salary is reasonable, the old company has been underpaying you for a long time. I very much doubt they would have tripled your salary (and you will get lots of advice against accepting such a counteroffer even if it ...


30

I feel, in addition to disappointment on part of the manager, there was a misjudgement on his side: He most likely assumed that you were leaving for 'no good reason', i.e. for only a few percent more money. If you had asked him, he would have given you that 10% raise, or even an extra-generous 15%. At least that's what he tells himself now. If you told him ...


29

At the risk of sounding like your parents, you may need to step back from your (likely temporary) discomfort and consider the big picture: As you stated, you've only been there two weeks. Careers are a lifelong pursuit. Two weeks into your first job, you may not be in a position to legitimately make a choice about what you like or don't like. I apologize if ...


22

I also am a non-coffee, non-beer drinker. If offered a coffee, just say no thanks. Requesting water instead is usually a safe choice. "No, thanks--but do you have water, please?" If you feel the urge to offer someone something, why not be more open and offer any beverage. "Can I get you something to drink? Coffee, tea, water...?" Many other non-coffee ...


19

Depending on where your company is located, there are some privacy rules and laws which might mandate protecting personal data. That apart, information like those you list might help a potential competitor in tailoring economical offers to lure employees in leaving the company. I think you should report the leak, and if you are concerned about keeping your ...


15

I want to add a more open answer because you did the right thing even if your boss wasn't an asshole nor was exploiting you (which he was and did). There's a lot of people for whom the workplace is a war/competition/jungle and find normal to exploit people until they fight back. For these people, asking for a raise against leaving is normal behaviour. But ...


14

You should immediately report this to whoever in your organization is responsible for data protection. Unfortunately, you don't state what your jurisdiction is, so I will answer based on my jurisdiction. In my jurisdiction, any company above a certain size must have a designated Data Protection Officer. (If more than 10 employees are routinely processing ...


14

You do not specify which country you are in, but at every American company that I have ever worked for, the HR department made it absolutely clear to all managers that they were never under any circumstances to say anything when giving a job reference except to confirm the period of employment. The primary function of HR is to manage risk for the company ...


13

It is a good thing you found yourself a new job. Let's consider what would of happened if you asked your current employer for a higher salary before searching for a job. Judging by what was said so far about him, he would tell you he can raise it maybe 2 or 3k per year, or in worse case scenario, realise that you have gained consciousness about your skills ...


12

I lose nothing if I don't report it, and I might lose something if I do You may have something to lose if you don't report it… …but later someone else does. If there's an audit following the report, your name may come up in a list of people who have downloaded the file. As a result, there may be questions as to what you did with the file when you ...


12

Personally, I would report it. Think about it this way. If it was YOUR data, what would you like to happen if somebody knew that YOUR data has been leaked.


9

As very well noted in other answer and comment, talk to your potential manager ASAP. Do not wait until your meeting next week. Be prepared that confessing about the lie will most likely lead to disqualification. Good that you are planning on confessing, better to do it before the company starts the background check and approach your school. I'm not sure ...


9

"Getting coffee or beer together" is just an expression. It means "let's meet for an informal chat in the afternoon/evening". It has nothing to do with beer or coffee. If you come to such a meeting and don't buy coffee or beer, probably nobody will care. You might object that it is boring to sit around and watch a bunch of people drink. Go ahead and join ...


8

Like you, I also don't like beer (much), although I will drink it to be social, and I often refuse a coffee when offered at my parents' house, although I will accept one from a colleague or manager. I much prefer other alcoholic and caffeinated beverages, such as a hot chocolate or a cider. If I remember to ask for a hot chocolate instead of a coffee when ...


6

Mine is filled with club soda and lime (I just happen to like that combo). "Sure - I have my drink here, let's grab a coffee." At bars, a classy non-alcoholic drink is also a club-soda with lime (or grenadine) or whatever, so use your imagination and still have a good time. I have co-workers who join us all the time and grab non-sweet iced tea or a diet ...


5

First, I'm a beer AND coffee enthusiast and homebrewer but not a heavy drinker myself. I have mountains of respect for those who, even in a pro-alcohol culture, avoid alcohol. So, please never feel the need to drink in order to drive your social and/or professional life - you're doing the right thing. That said, I suggest herbal teas sweetened or ...


4

I am going to disagree with the current top (and accepted) answer. Defense contractors are known within the tech industry to be slow-paced and, in many cases, "boring" to work for. Of course that's relative, but your experience at one will be much different compared to working for a unicorn/top tech company. The tech will mostly be pretty old and there ...


4

Yes, and please do it anonymously. In other words, I lose nothing if I don't report it, and I might lose something if I do. You should definitely consider reporting to the concerned people (CTO, HR) and do so anonymously. On Slack, it is possible to delete a message. If this information gets to the right people, they may ask the poster to delete it. (Not ...


3

Report it. In light of this information, no one is gonna give a damn about you poking around in Slack; if the sysadmins have been doing their job then you poking around this wouldn't be a cause for concern as you should have been denied access to anything that wasnt in your domain so to speak. If anything, it will look worse on you if you don't report it, ...


3

I found that an employee who is no longer with us uploaded a giant Excel file containing HR information into Slack. The file is available to anyone in our Slack and contains names of all current and former employees, their contact details, full names, who has stock options, annual leave entitlements, HR history and various notes about them, but not the ...


3

Should I tell our CTO about this? You should tell someone in management, whether that's the CTO, your direct manager, or someone else. On the other hand, I don't have a plausible explanation for how I found this file (yeah, I was poking around our Slack on a weekend to see what I can find). I also think that whatever I say in the future, people ...


3

My teamlead told the latest new hire that it's normal to take about 6 months before they are able to do any programming by themselves. Not because they don't have the skills to program but because they have no knowledge about our programs, business logic, ... Instead of asking your functional teamlead "give me a project". I would first focus on getting up ...


3

Many answers here, but I wanted to suggest a specific strategy at bars. Alcoholic drinks are consumed slowly over time. If you order a normal soft drink like Coca Cola you are likely to finish three glasses in the time that the people drinking alcohol finish one. I have taken to ordering ginger beer, which is like ginger ale but much heavier on the ginger....


3

I would say that, by far, the most important thing to do in these scenarios is to be honest with your coworkers as you have been here. Your coworkers are inviting you to these activities to informally build a relationship with you. A large part of that relationship is trust. You can find analogues of these micro-team-building exercises across civilizations ...


2

As an employer, I really don't care if you quit or even give any notice. I am not sure why so many people over think this scenario. We receive 100's of applications for each job, and we interview nearly a dozen of those people. If you quit, we often have a whole list of other people to make a job offer. If you politely tell them it is not working for you,...


2

Inform your hiring manager ASAP, but do it in person or over a phone, so as to both impart more urgency and leave less of a paper trail. Don't say you lied and don't make excuses, just state as a matter of fact that your application was incorrect. People know what it means, but it's best not to admit to more than you need to. Lies about education are the ...


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