46

Yes, the ellipsis in this usage should not be used in professional environment. The only "good" usage of ellipsis in a sentence you're writing1 is to replace etc. Why one shouldn't use it? Written communication is subject to interpretation. In a professional environment, you always want your message to be as clear as possible so everyone will get the ...


35

I disagree with the conclusion reached in most of the answers provided so far. Is the use of ellipsis commonly considered to be unprofessional? Should I ban the three dots from my business communication? In my opinion, this is a matter of context. Yes, ellipsis just stuck at the end of a sentence, can be an implied rude or unprofessional comment. ...


20

So if I was to talk to her boss and tell him that he is seriously messing with her mental health (which she has a bad history with and I'm scared this is going to push her over) would I potentially get her fired? Yes, you could. Whether she would be fired over this depends on location / culture / how much of an arse the boss is, but it certainly strikes me ...


16

Ellipses are perfectly fine if used correctly. If you intend to indicate that you're skipping a bit of verbiage, especially when quoting a speech or a technical reference, they're perfectly acceptable. For example, if you wanted to point out that there are six different date formats in ISO 8601, and you want to quote the W3c, their page says this: ...


13

I think you're starting to handle it correctly. It's not a question of 'we'd like to change', it's more; 'the company is changing. Are you coming along?'. HR need to be involved at this point, as it sounds like a PIP is in order. In the end it may be that Linda has to find a new position elsewhere. The only benefit I see here is that she has historical ...


12

To answer: Is the use of ellipsis commonly considered to be unprofessional? Should I ban the three dots from my business communication? In case of any official / formal written communication, I'd strongly advise against using those. For a casual quick chat over IM, this may be acceptable, but think this way, if you are at the receiver end, you'd not ...


10

Too much depends on personalities we don’t know to give a definite answer, but even if it’s deserved, being a jerk back rarely improves the situation. Start with replacing “jerk” with “coworker” in your question. This establishes a baseline for how you should at least normally treat people. How you are viewed by others will be heavily influenced by how ...


10

Just to add a different perspective - in some cultural contexts, ellipses can be perceived as less rude than periods as the latter could imply curtness or sternness, while the former implies the speaker is making an open-ended suggestion. I have found this to be the case with some (especially older or less technologically savvy) colleagues in some ...


9

Short answer: YOU ABSOLUTELY can get her fired Longer answer. Say nothing, as any action you can take will only hurt your mother. Putting on evil, bullying manager hat If I were a bullying manager, and I was calling someone "useless", and her son came up and said something to me, I'd think even less of her. I might fire her outright, by noting ...


8

Chill work environment, small company Weekend Only ones in the office Canada Yes, you'll be more than fine wearing jeans and t-shirt. Very formally dressed up you'll possibly even look a little bit out of place - as you'll see, there is a different atmosphere on a quiet weekend meeting like this, compared to the usual weekdays. Casual appears a lot more ...


6

It depends on context. In the examples you give the ellipsis certainly could be taken in a rude or dismissive manner. It would be best to avoid using one in those situations. Those examples don't cover all cases. One might see something like: Our clients include Megacorp, Very Big Company, Large Charity, ... or: The research showed that several ...


6

I realized I had been exceptionally ill behaved [...] she approached me out of the blue and told me that I was doing my job incorrectly. And that I had to do the polishing using the tools she does, although said she wasn't going to teach me at that point either. I got defensive and showed her the casting imperfections that I could remove from polishing and ...


5

I feel before moving onto the action in PeteCon's good answer, as you have already decided to have one last talk with her, you should make that talk very direct. This is how things are now. If you do not adopt then unfortunately we have to look at replacing you. Linda has to be clear that this is not open to negotiation now and things have got serious. I ...


5

If a team is regularly delivering late, there are two obvious possible causes: Either they are given more work than they can reasonably deliver. Or they are not very good at their job / not working hard enough. There is a not so obvious reason: They are not well organised, and while working hard, they are wasting time due to bad organisation. That can ...


4

It sounds like you're trying to get Linda and her team to use some kind of project tracking tools? If you're a PM, you might find this hard to believe, but many pros think PM tools are a colossal waste of time. They have a point, to be honest. This person and their team is probably working hard with limited resources. They probably need more equipment, time,...


4

Would any good come out of helping him ? (Are there positive points to favor the argument of helping him? I don't see any.) On one hand you want to be a good person. On another hand you don't want to "reward" bad behavior. The good that you would receive from helping someone that is a jerk would be: Strengthening your own knowledge by teaching someone else,...


4

"..." can mean different things depending on context. In the context of business email or messaging, they're typically just examples of bad style or lazy writing, an excuse to write sentence fragments and incomplete thoughts. "..." demands the reader to fill in the rest of the info as though it were too trivial to just state explicitly. "..." can have ...


3

I honestly don't know what to do but I'm immensely worried. Any issue that your mother is having is between her and her boss. If she feels that he is being demeaning, she can and should be able to speak up for herself. If the boss continues his behavior, she can and should escalate through the appropriate channels within her company. You can speak with ...


3

Don't put it on your resume A resume is a marketing document. You wouldn't put in a sales brochure that the prior owner of a house left after only a month. Something should only go on the resume if it makes you look good. Just leave it off. It will seem like you were unemployed for two months (assuming your prior job search took a month). Should I ...


2

Resisting your leadership, and the company's morphosis into an enterprise? undermining your decisions by poisoning her own crew against your ideas? Thinks she is "right 99% of the time"? "Why should I change?!"? Going into childish stonewalling/silence-treatments after every talk (implying there were at least several such talks)? I'd say you have gone "...


2

I think PeteCon has a good point with "The company is changing, are you coming along" - this is a growing pain that longtime employees have to go through when a company is growing up. However, I don't think that's the whole of the story. You say she's a competent employee and yet she's resisting your changes. You haven't managed to convince her of the need ...


2

It's possible that there's gender issues at play here that you might not be aware of. You mention in the comments that you're a transmale, so it's possible you may not be aware of certain gender dynamics that cismales grow up understanding. In particular, there are many women who are simply afraid of men, especially angry men. When you had your "small tiff",...


2

The good that would come is that you can work together, despite personal differences, and achieve a common good for your company. You could be seen as someone who rises to the occasion, and has difficult conversations with difficult people. You could be a better employee for the approach you take here. On the subject of your plan here, I highly doubt the ...


1

Continue interviewing. If company B makes you an offer and you decide to take it, let company A and your university know as soon as possible. Until that time, however, do not divulge the fact that you're interviewing to anyone who does not strictly need to know. If asked by your university, dodge the question by pointing to your offer from company A. If ...


1

We can´t tell you what to do. First make up your mind where you ultimately want to be. Startup can be quite exciting, but can also be a hell to work in an with no experience... you will probably be expected to do get things done with little supervision. If you want to stay at A, tell B you have singed a contract elsewhere. Tell them you are sorry but the ...


1

It may or may not get her fired but it's almost certain to make it works and it's damn sure not going to help resolve her situaion, which is undeniably extremely unpleasant. I can sympathize, I really can - I've been there where I'd have liked nothing more than to ride in like the wrath of god and lay down some harsh words on someone mistreating loved one ...


1

I would say there isn't a hard and fast rule — an ellipsis can be safe enough in some situations but not others. The key question is, are you being clear with your tone and is the omitted information completely irrelevant? When you end a sentence with "...", imagine you have replaced with the phrase "there is more, but I won't go into it here". In some ...


1

Depends on the culture. For example lets compare Germany and USA. Germans are known for efficiency and getting straight to the point. Your example is quite the normal here. You need update, you ask for it. There is nothing rude in requesting information on something job related. Everything else around the question that doesn't directly contribute to the ...


1

Is this good enough to use for professional emails? I know you said this is a different company - but it still heavily, heavily depends on the context. I've sent similar emails to this to bump existing support requests that aren't answered or resolved within the contractual time - that's fine, as you're (rightly) requesting an update on something that ...


1

I would ask you manager in this situation.


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