117

Dmitry is right in his answer in that you allowed the candidate to submit the sample work in a different format without knowing what the consequence of that change would be. This is something that you need to be proactive in admitting is your problem. You also need to point out why this has resulted in the rejection of this candidate. For the purposes ...


104

First, one thing no answer has pointed out yet is that you lied to John. This is a serious matter. No team can properly function when team members lie to their boss or their peers. Actually, that may be hindering the team's productivity right now. John doesn't know that Mike didn't have knowledge about the task you were doing. What if Mike has been doing ...


94

For a 15 minute trip I would cover the costs myself. It's just not worth the hassle of sending them the receipt and waiting a month for their expenses. If you've flown in to a foreign city it would be a different story, and your transportation could be part of the trip expenses, somewhat dwarfed by your airfare. This doesn't seem the case from your question. ...


73

You allowed this person to be tested using a different tool. To me, that would mean that you wanted to evaluate the quality of the translation, not the format of the submission. Perhaps that person assumed the same and felt that her time was wasted. In any case, this person got angry dissatisfied with your recruiting process, and I don't think that ...


30

Unless you draw unusual particular attention to your online name, it isn't going to harm you. For example, don't show up at an interview with a t-shirt saying "I am Overlord Dragon". And don't use phrases like "we humans" during an interview. You won't appear "less controllable" solely due to your online name. You'll only appear that way if you act that ...


18

You can say, without blaming Mike, that you sought help from Mike and implemented what you understood his instructions to be to the best of your ability. Say what you thought Mike's instructions were. Say you are not sure whether You misinterpreted Mike's instructions. You understood Mike's instructions correctly, but implemented them incorrectly. You ...


18

You tested her and she failed, that’s it. Because she didn’t deliver what you needed, and because you can do without the drama. You can reply that the technical aspects created you lots of costly extra work (that should explain to her why it is important to you), and that you will not be using her services in the future. Or, you can go to your manager ...


17

For example, I believe the title "Senior Software Engineer" carries a lot of weight. Don't. Seriously. The weight it carries varies wildly depending on the organization. It can mean a lot, or it can mean basically nothing. There is no certification or professional accreditation for "software engineer" to begin with, so it makes little sense to place much ...


14

I was in a similar situation once, a few years ago, and I chose to cover the expenses myself. To me it seemed like a good investment, considering I really wanted the job. While there's probably no harm in asking, I figured: why take the chance it might offend someone, or leave them with an impression of me worse that it otherwise might be. I wouldn't want ...


13

Your task, your mistake You needed help and asked Mike who genuinely provided what he thought what was best for a task assigned to you. A good question you might ask yourself : what good can come out of blaming Mike? In my opinion, badmouthing Mike to your boss might only give a poor image of yourself. As you said yourself, John 'hasn't the best tact or ...


10

Is it ok to be expected to open the door for these painters? If management knows you are on site and have communicated to you that painters will be arriving and that you should allow them to enter then yes you are expected to open the door. If you have received no communication from management, I would not open the door. If the 3rd party has an issue with ...


9

I think you're overthinking this. Just ask them to book and pay for a taxi. Seems like the company is quite keen to interview you ASAP based on: they seem to be in a bit of a hurry they have asked a couple times if it could be sooner Now, two things They know that if you're good, you won't be able/willing to bend to accommodate their schedule at ...


9

Regarding (1): As someone who's been involved in reviewing, interviewing and hiring applicants in IT (developers): If you put this information forward and make sure I know it's important to you, finding "Antitheist Gnostic Atheist" at the top of your Twitter feed and seeing questions like this on SE will certainly make me wonder about both your perspective ...


8

The same way you gracefully leave any company. But, before you do, you need to step out of the exceptionally deferential mindset that led you to this situation. Already we can see in your question and in your comments (e.g. offering to work for free after you've left?!) that you are conflict-averse to the point of routinely and habitually worrying more ...


7

What is the best way for me to have this meeting with HR and not place myself in the firing line? My first instinct is to suggest you don't have the meeting at all... If your manager is most of the time nice and understanding, but sometimes he becomes excessively critical, it may be due that he/she is under a lot of stress, deadlines, etc.. This is not ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Raise it with your manager, they can then determine how to proceed and with whom. Firstly, if you were to get fired for reporting something that someone else already knows about that has been around for two years, then you probably have bigger issues to worry about in that organisation. Now that's out of the way, I would suggest you ...


5

I work in recruiting and we haven't quite got there yet, buying cabs/Ubers for local interviews. Although I've joked, the way people ghost or no show for car troubles, getting lost, traffic/accidents that might be next... But yeah it's one thing if there is interest from another city, but locally you're responsible for showing your own reliable ...


5

Blame doesn't have to belong to one person, it can be shared. It's not necessarily a mistake to get help from a coworker rather than you boss, unless your boss has given you explicit instructions to go to him for help. Especially if Mike is senior to you. If Mike is aware of the misappropriated blame, then the ball is really in his court. The decent thing ...


4

The HR team is available to help you through a challenging conflict with your manager, both formally an informally. In your discussion, you should express a specific request of the HR team member you meet. You could ask for things like: "I want help preparing and thinking about how to best approach my manager to keep the conversation civil and productive." "...


4

I understand where you are coming from. I think the key is to realise that this is the reality. Some people are just lucky and stumble up the workplace ladder, despite their shortcomings. You also need to learn to pick your battles. If something is not going to have a massive negative impact, maybe it's not worth your time and emotional investment to be ...


3

How do I not care when someone has no idea what he's talking about but just keeps talking? If this person is talking to you and you have other more important things to do (and the chat is not related to a task or current project) I say it's perfectly fine to politely dismiss them, something perhaps like: "Hey Joe, I'd love to keep chatting with you, but I ...


3

It never hurts to ask. I believe big companies have rules and they either pay for something or not. So you don't have to be somehow specially convincing, just ask politely "is it possible that you....". Also, usually, there is another person who manages your trip than the recruiter or interviewer. They may share impression about you to somebody who makes ...


3

It's not rude to ask, but it's not very professional either. The company knows you're located in the same city, and that they are reachable by public transportation. Asking for a taxi ride in this case is not common. In the end, you're trying to save your time, and suggesting the employer should pay for that will not play in your favour. Especially for a 15-...


2

I won't comment on the working weekends and holidays, or the 7-8 years old startup company. However... What you describe sounds like a security issue in the making, if not already one. Being expected to let strangers into the office, when upper management says nothing and your immediate supervisor doesn't know, basically means that just about anyone can ...


2

Depending on the workplace, no, it could definitely not be OK for you to open the doors for outside workers. If management hires contractors, they should arrange for their access. If you let random people in, you might be held liable if they steal or vandalize anything. Yes, you might get questioned for not letting them in, but generally I would make a very ...


1

Hummm... It sounds like your manager has created an unhealthy environment. You got off on the wrong foot, but he's already made you nervous about asking questions or not knowing what to do. Stop blaming yourself. Obviously you can't relax and talk to this manager - so you're in a loop where you get more anxious thinking about the next time, and will probably ...


1

Go ask your boss if you can make it right and do it over the way he would want it to be done, and with help from him. Explain that the first time you sought help from your coworker and unfortunately it didn't work and that maybe it was more complex than you first thought. Then make it right by doing the project the way the boss-man wants (or not doing it if ...


1

Explicitly blaming for something under your responsibility usually does not look good. However, I suggest explaining to your boss your chain of thought. Since you were not sure how to perform said task, you asked Mike's advice. You both agreed that the task should be done like you did it. Next time if there is anything unclear you will ask your boss for ...


1

Could you please post the exact location of your office, so next week a can come with my mates to take all the computers away for maintenance? Seriously, nobody comes in my office unless my boss has ordered me to let them in, and has told me how to identify them. And I’d have to watch them, so if they outnumber the office workers, they still can’t come in.


1

I'm a little bit unclear on a couple of points of the question, so please forgive me if I'm off-target. But, taking the questions (as I read them) in order: 1. Yes, it's absolutely OK to expect an on-site employee to let in workers that need access to the site. The part of your story that is unacceptable is that the person (or people) in charge of hiring ...


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