164

Ninety nine times out of a hundred, a random person who saw money being handed off to someone else wouldn't think anything of it. There could be a variety of reason why this money is exchanging hands and the observer would have no way of knowing what the context was unless they asked one of the individuals to which they would either be told "Bob wanted ...


62

A co-worker friend who has left a wallet at home might ask to borrow money. It's someone you know, and it's no big deal. People seeing that would probably not notice. But in that case, they always pay it back, or buy lunch for you the next time. Keeping close tabs isn't important if there is a back and forth that tends to balance out. You said that you'...


20

If it's from friends (people with good working relationships who pay you back) and the amount is something you can give without repercussions for you, then it's OK (in the Czech Republic). Also: If you don't want to lend them money, then politely say no. You don't have to explain yourself and if pressed can either say some prepared white lie or tell them the ...


17

The problem is you're trying to react with politeness to something that is very much not polite. You have two options: Tell her that taking food from your area is rude and you'd like it to stop. (It may or may not stop). Keep your food in a locked area, so she can't take it. (You might need to buy a locked lunch box or something like that.) Do NOT leave ...


13

Since they offer you several choices, it's okay to ask. As an IT Domain Manager, I would (and do) find it immature if someone request a better computer that what we have, especialy if the employee isn't IT related or doesn't have special needs (ex : dev). This is the case where there are no choice. When I propose multiple computer model to an user and if he/...


11

Where I work this wouldn't be an issue. People loan other money for small things like lunch, no problem. The employees where I work are actually trustworthy.


11

If you can't lock your drawer, get a container (box, bag, whatever) with a lock on it and keep that in your drawer. Breaking the lock or stealing the whole container is a step up from stealing the food, at least in the thief's mind. They have no excuse for opening your drawer in the first place, so they can hardly complain about the lock. (My assumption is ...


10

I concur with most answers that there is nothing wrong or suspicious in lending/borrowing a small amount of money in the office. In most cultures I'm familiar with. It just can range from "uncommon" to "ubiquitous" in different places. So I'll address the "with audience" part, which hasn't been covered. If anything, making the ...


9

The problem with using information from your sister is that your boss will want to hear the accusations directly from her. Don't involve her unless she's willing to get involved as it could make her a target for abuse and harassment. I suggest talking to the other remote workers to see if they also receive a lot of negativity in emails and other interactions ...


9

Usually only teenagers yawn on purpose It is quite possible that he is bored, but yawning to deliberately demonstrate annoyance is very immature and would be very unusual unless the CEO were otherwise known to be that way. You are assuming the worst of someone who was probably just bored and/or tired.


9

Usually he asks me if I'm OK if he leaves early. I find these questions uncomfortable because I don't see it as my decision Well you're right. That question is not your decision. This whole situation got created right here. The next time Bill asks you if it's okay if he leaves early, just tell him that you would be more comfortable if he asks your ...


9

It’s not snitching if you are answering a direct question honestly. Unless your manager asked you why you were alone (Bill left early) and then followed up that question with “does that happen a lot?” you shouldn’t have volunteered that information. I try to focus on myself and what it takes to get my job done instead of what is fair and what others “deserve”...


7

You didn't "snitch" on your colleague. You raised a real problem that's affecting your work to your manager. You ask: In general when is something snitching and when is it a good idea not to just "mind your own business"? Generally, the difference is in whether your work is impacted or not. If you're "telling on people" when ...


6

This is also popcorn that my coworker keeps inside or under his desk, so she is going into his personal space. This isn't your battle to fight. Regardless if you bought the popcorn or not. If you gave it to your boss and Karen steals it from him, then she's stealing from him, not you. Let him deal with it if he's so inclined. She went into my desk to steal ...


6

If they are asking you to make a choice, wanting to have the relevant information upon which one would assess the options would not be considered pushy or unprofessional. I would expect they'd have specs handy and doubt you would be the first to ask.


6

I don't think other people will think anything when they see you handing money over because people use cash to place bets or in the U.S. we have this thing where school kids sell things to support their school. The parents will offer those things for sell at work sometimes. Stuff like holiday candy for example. I've known several types of people who always ...


4

The problem is clear - "small company". Now, it's not an always thing, but that usually translates to small-mindedness. Small-company developers with little IT support tend to set things up as if no one is ever going to come in behind them and perform any maintenance on their work. I'm actually dealing with this with a client RIGHT now. There ...


3

First off, forget about other people's property. Even if you paid for it as a gift, it is no longer your property to be concerned with. If the person you are gifting the popcorn does not care about it being stolen, then you aren't going to get anywhere by complaining on their behalf. If somebody is stealing directly from you, then you can do something about ...


3

Your post strikes me as odd for three reasons: You "find it unusual that someone with a family at home wouldn't be able to pay their own lunch". That is, you assume they don't have sufficient funds to afford lunch. That thought would never occur to me here in Germany or in the U.S. for a colleague; the only people who cannot afford lunch are also ...


2

Do you have a history of not being done when you say you are? I've had the "what is the meaning of 'done'" converstation at several companies. People have a tendency to say it's done when it's coded but not fully tested. Or merged but not released. Or a dozen other things. Engineers tend to think of "done" as code being written, ...


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