34

You do not take or leave jobs based on what is best for the employer. You take or leave jobs based on what is best for you. It appears that you are at least ok at graphic design. Others might be better, but you're meeting this client's needs. You probably have some other skills, like listening to what the client wants or accepting change requests, that are ...


9

Don't stress. These things happen. Just email them back apologising, saying that on reflection you misinterpreted what they said, and that you are, of course, willing to catch up earlier if that works for them. If you're on the fringe, you do need to be as accommodating as possible. So be sure to be as permissible as possible, when you list new times. The ...


9

No. He is joking, telling the year 2020 to go away because it is drunk. It may be in response to David’s post about 2020, or, given the timing, might just be a preamble to his posting that weird science article that’s been making the rounds lately. If you are going to look for offense in joke channels, you’ll find it, maybe stick to the work ones.


8

"Internship you're not qualified for." This is a possibility in vacuum... for someone the boss hasn't worked with before. This isn't a possibility for you. Why? Because the boss has worked with you before, has liked the quality of your work, and wants to keep you onboard. This isn't a question of whether you're not qualified. You absolutely, positively ...


6

TL;DR: In summary if you "forward" an email it should be a verbatim copy (or else you are essentially mis-quoting the original writer). Otherwise you could summarise and rephrase the email and ask the question again to the onward recipient, but then you wouldn't be mis-crediting words to the original email-writer. Longer answer: No, in the case you ...


5

I think it's reasonable to edit an email's contents before forwarding to remove irrelevant information to the recipient, so long as it doesn't impact the meaning of the email to the person receiving it. What impacts the meaning, though, is hard to judge sometimes. An example might be, in something like your situation, if I am the project manager for a ...


2

Most companies want to fit all the interviews within a small window of time. This allows them to fill the position without risking losing the best candidate if they are the first one interviewing. If they have to wait a month for the last candidate, they may decide to cancel that last interview if they believe they have a good match in the applicants already ...


2

Now, I said the above things in brief to my manager Why did you do that? What is your desired outcome and what are you trying to achieve? and he gave me the rights to make a decision on his process of hiring. This would be very unusual and your manager shouldn't not do that. It is their decision and not yours. You may have misunderstood: your manager ...


2

You really shouldn't go over your managers head, because then you are suggesting that two people are under average. If you think that there is someone, or something, holding the team back, then it is appropriate to go to your manager. You should give the manager a chance to rectify things. It is always better to point to things and not people. If you are ...


1

What is going on? You are being abused by your CEO because he knows he'll get away with it, since you are emotionally invested and "keep your head down". What should I do? Given your passive nature, I see two options. 1) Get used to being abused, overworked, stressed, unhappy, underpaid and undervalued. 2) Find an employer who appreciates your talent ...


1

As a front end engineer with around 6 years experience, there's multiple things I can advise you on. So let me run through them: Allegiance to a company is a bad idea, unless your rank is something very high, like a CTO (and even then, your welfare comes first). There's 100 companies out there who need solid front end devs, and companies aren't your friends....


1

Adding someone to an established work team is not a trivial matter. I understand your concern. This man is someone with whom you have a greeting acquaintance, mutual friends, and past work experience. You also know that he is much more experienced than you, though you don't qualify that experience as professional experience. It sounds to me as if you have ...


1

Disclaimer: I don't know Japanese culture. You seem to have glossed over any possible mitigating circumstances. Peer pressure may have caused this person to act in a way to fit in his group of friends rather than how they act by themselves. This person was drunk. While that does not excuse their actions, drunk people are known to state or behave more ...


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