19

From the company perspective, up to now, you have been an asset. You have reported something that could have hurt the company and they removed the risk at basically zero cost. Good. But now, you are crossing the line from being an asset to the company to becoming a burden or liability. You want to incur costs (CEO time is valuable) for zero company gain. So ...


12

I want to be certain that the views expressed in the annual report are not representative of my company or its leaders. I think your best choice would be to move to another company, if your values are not aligned with those of the company. The content you find offensive was already published and signed by the executives. Apparently nobody raised an eyebrow ...


8

Full disclosure: I fall into several "protected" groups. In my opinion, this is problematic on several levels. It's several years old. The behavior stopped. You will cause no end of grief to yourself, and to others. You will achieve nothing Some companies frown on public political activism within their company, and you may end up looking very ...


6

Tell your manager your concerns and let them handle it. From the sounds it, it seems like managing the legal liability risks to the company of your coworker's actions isn't your responsibility. However, it likely would be your manager's responsibility. As such, I would simply request a one-on-one meeting with them, relay your concerns about possible illegal ...


4

No one cares how well you did or didn't do in your internship at a dodgy company during undergraduate studies. If they ask what you learned say, "Patience and a better ability to discern workplace issues."


3

Your options are obvious: Ask for more money, turn down the offer and keep looking, or take it as it is and make the best of it. Why are you asking here?


2

Is direct confrontation an appropriate choice to address this issue? That's only a choice that the OP can make. They need to consider whether their values are more important to them than their current position. You're currently in a position of trust as an employee, the organization has every reason to believe that you are operating in their best interest. ...


1

If you can't talk to your colleague directly and encourage him to move on, and if you're sure you can't work with your colleague any more, then I think the most sensible approach here is to have a talk with your manager, about concerns that have emerged. Be frank that you'd misjudged his character, and that you're simply not getting along. You might mention ...


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