100

"I don't want us to trouble our Supervisor." Your Supervisor can speak up for himself. Could be that the supervisor asked, "what would help team morale? I have a budget from the company for this" and your co-worker said, the x-box. I probably would have asked for a hot mocha latte with whipped cream. I'd leave it alone.


31

Ask yourself these three questions (context taken from your narrative): Is being talkative a problem? Are they disturbing you / others from getting their work done? Are they speaking in loud voices? Are they arguing all the time? Are they disrupting the concentration and focus needed for work? Is being friendly a problem? Are they violating the personal ...


24

Assuming that this is the first (and expectedly last) time this happening, I don't see it as a very big issue. However, the way you handled it is sub-par, and needs fixing. The wrong was not done when you did not get a chance to read/ respond to the email - people miss emails all the time, universe is not going to end for not reading an email / taking action ...


21

I feel it is my duty to pose a situational challenge to this question. You are entirely out of line: You are paying more attention to your colleagues duties than your own. You are eavesdropping on office conversations which are none of your business. You are spending office hours concerning yourself with others' personal matters. You are exposing your ...


19

Is it my responsibility to tell a team member off whom I think is crossing the line No. From what you describe here, it's hard to say if your team member's behavior is appropriate or not. For the sake of discussion let's assume that it is. Unfortunately people who behave inappropriately have little of the self-awareness necessary to listen to or take advice....


13

The problem here is not the email which you hadn't yet responded to. The problem is the "Uh OK" response to the follow-up phone call. Obviously the matter was urgent if you got a follow up call in such a short time. But the "uh ok" response dismisses the urgency of the problem and that can easily make anyone red-hot angry. It seems like ...


13

While I don't disagree with most of the current answers, I think they all miss the crux of the question's 2 critical points: It's never an employee's responsibility to tell off a coworker. This is management's responsibility. If you take it upon yourself to tell off your coworker, you're opening yourself to potential problems. At a minimum, you've made an ...


11

Unless you have a formal obligation, under your contract or local labour laws, there's no need for you to disclose the specific condition to your employer. Doesn't matter if they somehow find out - through insurance or otherwise - again, you're not obligated to inform them. As you mentioned you're currently working remotely and don't need to be taking any ...


8

If nobody mentioned it then probably nobody cares. Talk to your manager (or the manager of the team whose meeting you were in if it wasn't your team) and explain the situation, exactly as you explained it here, and say you've deleted the recording (make sure you actually do delete it) and apologize. It should be nothing serious.


7

asking our supervisor to buy an XBox X Series console at a black Friday sale for him, at regular working hours. I assume you mean, he's asking the supervisor to buy it with company funds, and get it for employees to use. What's wrong with that? Companies often buy games for employees to use in breakrooms. Game consoles are especially common. Would your ...


2

You are right that the best timing would have been right in the meeting. However, if you have another meeting with the same people soon you may however, raise it casually the next time. So, suppose you were greeting one another at the beginning of the meeting, you could mention: Oh, yes, I sometimes have connection issues. I generally turn on the live ...


1

You don't need to say anything because you didn't do anything wrong. When configured to allow recording, Microsoft Teams tells meeting participants, "By joining this meeting you have given consent for it to be recorded." Recordings are also made available in a very obvious way to all participants so anyone who wants to see what you recorded will ...


1

Given the situation above, would it be reasonable for my manager to state negatively on a performance review that I "ignore emails" or "ignore important emails"? I would say if it only happened once or twice, then no, it would seem unlikely to me that anyone would give it much thought and I wouldn't expect to see it appear on your ...


1

If I've got this right, the recruiters that you're considering talking to are the original people who impressed you at the company's booth. I'd recommend pushing past the disappointing behavioral interview and expressing continued interest in the original positions that were discussed. If it comes up, you could mention that the behavioral interview presented ...


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