75

The chances of this helping your situation are slim to none. Depending on how the e-mail would be worded it could even significantly hurt your chances. If it was just one of many questions I wouldn't worry about it too much. If the rest of the interview went fine and you did show a general knowledge in other situations I'd be somewhat surprised if they ...


12

It seems to be a little-known fact among society but lots of problems have more than one solution. Maybe telling you your answer was wrong was the test. Sometimes employers are looking for you to push back and say "Look. My answer is also correct and here's why..." or maybe they were looking for you to entertain the possibility of the ...


10

If this is bad etiquette, what should I do when someone is trying to guide my project using known incorrect reasoning? Make your case. If they reject your suggestions, ideas, and opinions then do what your boss tells you to do. It isn't your company. It isn't your decision. At the end of the day, they pay you to perform work. You may sometimes disagree with ...


9

Unfortunately, it is a case of "just forget it". (IF it was someone you knew very well and had a lot of back and fore chat with, you could email and say "I was thinking about X, and ...". But it sounds like this is just another corporate interviewer.) So should I mail him back with proper references that my solution was correct? ...


6

Keep in mind that interviewers are not perfect. In particular for your case, interviewers are not always strong coders. It's not out of the question that they simply didn't understand your solution. Along those lines, part of most programming jobs is justifying your solution to others. If you can't do that in the course of a meeting, your solution would ...


5

Should you send a follow-up about this? Yes. No. Maybe. I wouldn't expect this to make a huge difference (if it makes any difference) in their decision in any case, but let's go through the options. No. If you explained it well enough during the interview and he still didn't accept it, there's a good chance he won't respond positively if you follow up ...


3

Don't email him, that time has passed and you already explained. If he's a serious professional he may actually have looked it up himself to check your answer. I certainly do if someone disputes what I think is correct. Having said that if there are multiple possible answers and I'm looking for a particular one, then it makes no difference if your solution ...


3

This happened to me in an interview with a FAANG company once. I was very upset. However, it's really not worth it. It's seen as unprofessional behaviour to contact anyone involved with the recruiting process except for your recruiter directly, unless otherwise specified, for any reason, and in this case specifically it comes off as argumentative and ...


2

No, and don't accept an offer from this company. There's an expression used when hiring people - "A" quality people hire "A" quality people, "B" quality people hire "C" quality people. The explanation behind this is that people who are really good want to keep learning and hire people they can learn from, while people ...


2

No: If they reject you because of that, you don't want to work for them. If they reject you for other reasons, it doesn't matter. If they accept you anyway, it doesn't matter.


2

I instead after the meeting go and create a proof of concept to show that it is possible and present it the next time Do this before the first meeting. Meeting dynamics are things to learn from. If you want something to happen a certain way you prepare for the meeting and have your strategies in place before it starts to accomplish what you want. Make this ...


1

In the future, present your ideas privately one-on-one to the usual meeting participants before you bring them up to the entire group in the larger meeting. Group dynamics are weird, and it's much easier to correct your idea or convince someone of your idea when you're dealing with them one-on-one. Do the same with your manager as well. If your manager has ...


1

I came up with a solution and explained it to him but he had another solution in mind and didn't accept my solution even if I gave him logical reasoning behind my approach. You can email him if you want, but if you do, I recommend you specify the time complexity and the space complexity of your desired approach vs. the time complexity and the space ...


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