10

Yep. Even if you didn't say something explicitly sexual, good luck decoupling the sexual aspect from what you were going on about for a full minute. It also doesn't really matter that you weren't doing it for sexual gain yourself. For example, sexually degrading commentary (eg: disparaging comments about... size) can also pass as sexual harrassment. You say ...


7

Simply refer back to your personal connection and work from there. Since your connection has the inside track, he should be able to provide some kind of clarity as to what the current situation is. It might well be that the role isn't actually open for recruiting for yet, or there might be a breakdown in communication somewhere. Your connection is the only ...


7

You embarrassed the guy in front of your co-workers. That's all that happened here. He explained why he was embarrassed, you apologised (sort of), so that's an end to this situation. To be safe, just don't engage in or encourage this kind of sexualised joking in the office - it's kind of old-fashioned these days.


6

This absolutely could count as a harassment - and yes it could be considered sexual harassment. I was just joking That you intended it as a "joke" is irrelevent. I am sorry I didn't mean anything bad, this is a flattering thing actually As the old adage goes "When you're in a hole, you should stop digging.", your comments made him ...


4

Two weeks is a short time in the world of contemporary HR staff. The typical HR staffer will review hundreds of resumes and come up with a 'short list' of candidates. Then that list gets passed to the hiring manager for evaluation. After selection, HR does their follow up and contacts the candidates. A polite follow up with HR is definitely in order. That ...


3

In a word, yes. You were in a group that was having fun at the expense of a coworker, and then you escalated it. You may have thought of it as just joking, but this is how rumors start. Not only does this create a hostile work environment for the coworker that got upset, but also for the woman you were referring to. Once the rumor mill gets going, any ...


3

I don't think this is really a question for HR. This is a question for your companies legal team. If they give the green light, you may want to consider getting personal independent legal advice. Regarding the legal aspect, and the personal risk vs company risk, that's probably best answered by Law SE. But in my (non-legal) opinion: It's probably not likely ...


2

Have you thought of code reviews? Code reviews are a standard practice where you only merge your code in after there is a general acceptance of its quality, this usually comes before QA. This will mean that both you will review Johns work and John will review your work, it will usually catch surprises before they are merged and helps the team both gel and ...


2

Would this be considered harassment in a workplace - UK? Here is what the UK gov website says "Bullying and harassment is behaviour that makes someone feel intimidated or offended. Harassment is unlawful under the Equality Act 2010" I couldn't understand why he was so angry. There are many things I could say about this, there are many reasons ...


1

In some organisation you can have access to a "anonymous" misconduct reporting system. Those systems are often present in big corporation and meant to signal any conflict of interest or in your case, fraud. If you want to act on this situation I suggest to use it. However be sure to confirm with your manager, by teams or email, what he really meant....


1

If instead of calling it "inflating hours" you call it what it actually is, which is fraud, your answer should be more clear. Now, since Boss is in the US, and you are in the UK, not only is it fraud, it is international fraud and the laws of both countries may come into play, as well as any local jurisdictions, such as the state that Boss is in, ...


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