311

Why don't you just acknowledge that you found the problem and fixed it? Why do you need to name names? If pressed, tell the client "We left a testing filter in place. We removed the filter and the issue is now resolved." Naming Bob is not going to make the mistake any less concerning to the client and does nothing to appease them... and so naming ...


225

Personality traits are often observed and confirmed through subtleties in your behavior, and I suspect you're oblivious to those subtleties. Just as an example, I'm going to dissect a single sentence from your question: my boss, which I consider a really capable and smart manager, has a system for measuring developer performance, in which I constantly get ...


220

The professional response is to put on a smile, let them reference it all they want, take the free coffee or water offered, listen politely and then reject their offer. An interview is a two-way street. They try to find out who you are, you are trying to find out who they are. It's obvious there are no reliable results in a test that sets people up to ...


196

First, identify the problem. If you told me that your main concern is a little icon in your chat software, I would mentally wave you off and make sure that icon is green at all times without changing a thing about my work. Her chat icon is about as important as the color of her socks had she been in the office. Did your team try to reach her and she was not ...


172

You'll have the most luck persuading your co-worker to recognize their contributions to the collective problem, when you start by recognizing your own. Case in point: having proper IDE is more relevant than ever That would actually be a severe misunderstanding of the basic norms of sanity in modern software development. Modern projects utterly rely on the ...


156

How can I tell him that based on skills I don't see him as an appropriate candidate for the position in question without ruining our team spirit? You don't. You wish him good luck and that's it. It's not on you to to tell him you don't think he's qualified. Let him go through the interview process and for all you know he may surprise them. If you are ...


149

The contract between the client and your company is none of your business. Everyone makes mistakes, so you may find that it's not as big an issue as you feel it is. The only thing you can do is talk to your manager and see what they think about the situation. Some clients are just looking for ways to avoid paying and you may have be caught up in that. We ...


141

I suspect you're not going to like this answer, but I'm going to write it anyway: you are part of the problem. X was harassed and there was enough evidence for your employer to terminate M's employment. You are now attempting to use the fact that M was a bad person as a reason to avoid having X on your team. There's a term for that, and it is victim blaming. ...


136

While it is possible that you drew more attention to your mistake ( the manager may not have been aware that you missed the meeting ), your communication to the manager is the most professional thing that you could have done. Any good manager should be glad to have an employee who will own up to their mistakes and make the necessary adjustments to prevent ...


130

I’ll be 70 in a few months, and I still write some code. Not a lot, but some. My experience is that the latest tech is usually ephemeral, and it’s generally not all that difficult, intellectually. The basics of computer science and mathematics don’t change very quickly. Experience gives you things that newbies don’t have: deep knowledge of your company’s ...


127

Given the situation and the (likely) motivation behind the Director asking each of your team, I think I'd advise the following: Be factual, truthful, and CAREFUL. Consideration #1: You are all being asked, and the same person is going to review all of the answers. This means that if your answer is noticeably different to your colleagues' then the difference ...


123

Take a step back and relax a minute. It's pretty unlikely that these questions are intended as simply a means to torment you, and taking them as personal attacks is doing no one any good including yourself. First, Assume Good Intent Assume people asking these questions are genuinely curious and trying to both learn and to help you with suggestions. Your ...


120

Be happy he isn’t on his way out the door. I’ve always found it to be interesting that people in power (whether teachers, bosses, “thought leaders”, etc.) always lean on their high performers to get disproportionate performance increases but find it astonishing and unprofessional that they want disproportionate rewards for those increases. They are usually ...


113

Most decent companies use a “band” when looking at experience, they ask for 5 years and may accept 3 with other factors. Put 36 months and explain at interview if you get one. Any good HR will be able to look at the experience and decide.


112

If you didn't lie at any stage throughout the hiring process, then you probably have nothing to worry about. Just remember, though, that HR isn't there to protect your interests. Do not feel compelled to answer any questions that you do not want to. It's also worth remembering that usually when you are speaking with HR, you are not speaking as an agent of ...


108

There is only one way to mitigate the "under-sleep" problem: allow your employees to have a healthy life, and to separate the job life from the private life. Other than that, you need somebody who understands management to deal with the things. Based on the work needed, they will estimate the resources required: how many people, their required ...


107

Sounds like a win win situation. He's happier and less stressed. You're still getting the quality work done. Increasing the workload of an unhappy stressed employee is a bad idea in the long run. There is a limit to how much extra a person can do especially if they feel they're not being rewarded enough for it. Push on this and they may leave. I did 30% of ...


106

I am very annoyed by this warning and I think it is completely nonsense. You are right to be and it is. So there are two aspects to this. One is merely silly, the other is patently ridiculous. By and large, your employer doesn't get to dictate how you spend your time off. If you want to maximise your travel time during a holiday that's entirely up to you. ...


106

I'm going to leave this as-is, but suffice to say it was written against an earlier version of the question with less context. Specifically, before the value of the gift was known. I disagree with both other answers. I think you should let the employee know it was sent to them in error, and assuming it’s feasible then let them keep it anyway. Trying to find ...


106

Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to a human if you get an interview I rarely say this. But in this case, you have what a human would regard as 3 years of experience. A human will understand. A computer regards 35.75 months experience as identical to 24.0 months. Obviously this is wrong. Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to any human you talk ...


105

If you can't resolve the situation by talking to them personally, then you should not tell them that you're going to their boss. Personally, I'd talk to my own manager about the issue first and see what they have to say - they might well intervene on your behalf if this is affecting your work.


103

Firstly, check your contract. It is possible that it covers what happens with training. For me, my contract says that if I leave within a year of getting training, I have to pay back 1/12th of the cost of that training per month remaining to hit a year. (That is, if I get £600 worth of training and leave 9 months later, I have to pay the company £150). ...


100

"I don't want us to trouble our Supervisor." Your Supervisor can speak up for himself. Could be that the supervisor asked, "what would help team morale? I have a budget from the company for this" and your co-worker said, the x-box. I probably would have asked for a hot mocha latte with whipped cream. I'd leave it alone.


100

they will only provide the papers in-person, and not via e-mail, for some odd/nefarious reason). It doesn't matter. When they give it to you, just say that you need your lawyer to review it. And of course, do not sign it. Do not sign anything. Also, refuse any extension and refuse any exit interview. so my new job (was able to line one up with a cloud ...


97

While it is okay to leave (barring any clauses in your contract) I would urge caution in this. Your company just invested a small fortune on you. Companies don't throw money at things, they make investments. They see something in you that said "let us spend money that we don't need to spend on making this person more valuable". Since you were ...


96

Your experience will make up for slowing down. As a fellow software developer over 30, I too noticed the slowdown you've talked about in my early 30s. It occurred in all aspects of life, not just developing. Home renovations that used to take a few days took weeks. Partying all night got harder and harder. Coding till sunrise got less productive. I was ...


92

Other than doing my job to the best of my ability, should I be doing anything to maintain respect due to my age? Just act like a professional, and hold people accountable to do the same toward you. I've also been avoiding being public with my age. Specifically, on video calls (which aren't regular) I've avoided turning on my camera. Is this the correct ...


91

The question is confusing but I think most of the information in it is secondary to the main point which is this. You told the customer an item cost one price (say $100) and they paid this, then you applied a discount without telling the customer and kept the difference. Most people, including me and almost certainly your bosses, will consider this theft. ...


88

they give the option to work 4 days and then I could spend 1 day on my thesis. This is a very generous and reasonable offer from the company. That means it's a good company and hence you should really consider it thoroughly. It would be shame to let that one go, Although this sounds interesting, I think that one day a week would not be enough to finish my ...


86

A few thoughts - first, generally speaking, the less you reveal, the less likely you say something that might cause someone to reject you. I'm not saying it's rational, but maybe the interviewer has a bias against night shift workers. If you had never mentioned it, their bias would never have been triggered. Second, and perhaps more importantly, when you ...


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