New answers tagged

1

Yes, I would let the review stand. I don't think this is a fight you can win. Instead, I would focus on this if I were you: [The manager's reply to my initial response was: That I had been troubling team members (without specifying that it was only 1 person), by continually asking basic questions. And now they also say that I cannot communicate and work ...


6

Dealing with a bad performance review is unpleasant but simple & straight forward Don't argue. It's pointless. This IS the perception of your manager, whether you like it or not Ask your manager for help and how to improve. Create an actionable plan with quantitative metrics that you both agree on. Then track the plan preferably in weekly one-on-one ...


2

I would argue the damage is done It is very hard to change their minds once they have made them up. "Reasons" seem like "excuses" and the comments being quite general and opinion based rather than concrete with clear examples of error point to someone who is not all that evidence driven anyway. It doesn't help that you are not the ...


1

First, with most larger/professional companies, HR is already very involved with the performance review process. This is especially true with the negative reviews. At my company, every performance review will get read by HR or a manager a step above. Second, HR's job is to limit and mitigate risk and exposure for the company. They do this by ensuring the ...


8

From your question I can see the main cause of both problems you face. You're overly verbose when communicating. You could have cut this question in half and still had too much. If this is the style your manager and colleague are seeing I'm not surprised the latter doesn't want to assist you and the former has lost interest. Some people have little patience ...


-1

I'll echo the other answers in saying "Could it? Yes. Will it? Who knows?". The new information I'll provide is to say that, unless you are doing significant, important, related work to the job you are seeking, I would omit it from the resume. You are seeking a software development job; you explained your relationship to this website as mainly ...


3

Could this hurt my chances of getting hired? It could. Will it? That's anyone's guess. The fact that you've asked the question tells me that you think it will hurt your chances, so don't include it. Find some other way of demonstrating your work.


-1

Ideologies in economics usually don't scale. That is why there are a ton of efforts to flatten/neutralize ideologies, such as "Diversity and Inclusion" and so on. Personally, I would refrain from referencing to publications that have an ideological weight (and are not scientifically proven).


5

Could this hurt my chances of getting hired? Of course it could, though there is no way for us to tell if it will. For right or for wrong, there's a saying that goes "You are known by the company you keep." You need to decide ahead of time if the kinds of employers you are seeking would find this content objectionable or not. If so, you might ...


2

I do agree that mistaking 2020 vs 2021, even when it is understood as current year, might be worth criticizing you over. My thought based on your message is that your boss is telling you to slow down and don't just go pumping out emails without first looking it over. I would simply take a deep breath. Read the email once, then put it away, then read it again ...


7

Both you and your boss need to calm down. I sense hurt pride in your telling of events, and it seems the boss puts a lot more value on correction of those small mistakes than you do. Your boss is right to tell you about things you could do better. CC lists in mails can be a hot topic. Not including someone who should be in the loop causes harm, informing ...


0

Also, bear in mind that "you have your role, and your boss has hers." Part of your role is "to support her in her role." If she gives feedback to you, which you now call "criticism," instead consider it to be "guidance." Take that guidance and strive to do it ... without question. "Professionally." If she ...


-2

The thing is: I was employed as a senior expert! Both "senior" and "expert"!! Wow! I never saw these words used together, this is a first. Anyway, in a professional / corporate environment, communication is bound to certain rules. While the list of rules is not written in stone, and it may vary from company to company, they are usually ...


-1

Unfortunately, my colleague didn’t respond to help. I ignored him because I was caught off guard, actually doing my work. But also because I didn’t know how to respond. Good. I would continue to do this. I would also do what your colleague does which is ignore him. How should I respond to him to make him stop? I’d prefer to avoid face-to-face contact or a ...


6

A lot of guys who behave like this think that they are being "suave" when in reality this is simple lack of experience with women. What's the quickest way to get this to stop? Tell them straight up that this behavior is cringy. This serves two purposes: (1) There's a very good chance they will stop out of sheer awkwardness (and the realization that ...


12

I'd send an email, making sure that you keep a copy (perhaps even BCC to a non-work address). This is important, because it puts the conversation on record, so that you can establish that you made the request and what you requested. Something like this might be appropriate: Hi Bob, several times lately I've noticed you making comments about my appearance, ...


-7

Here's the thing: There are 2 problems with text-based communication which would make you want to avoid it and have this chat in person if possible: It's impersonal. And because it's impersonal, people can read things into your tone which isn't there, and start drama where it doesn't need to be. You don't want to start drama, because the one who starts ...


2

No offense but you sound like a difficult, wishy-washy candidate and I somewhat suspect the recruiter moved on to someone else. I do hope you haven't made many mentions of this application list.... Them knowing you're applying elsewhere on its own isn't much of an issue, but that and many filtering questions may indicate that it will be easy for you to get ...


1

This is an interesting question. I'm not exactly sure how you would be interacting in an IT department with so many people and so many ranks, that there are groups that are beneficial for you to hangout with and other groups that are negative to you to hang out with. Generally... Professionally, you should be treating all, from the employees on corrective ...


1

You need to set boundaries, but you can do it in a very caring and compassionate way, while giving some advise on executive maturity. "Hey, we had a very productive working relationship, and I value our friendship, and I really don't want you to take this the wrong way or be offended, but, I don't work there anymore. I appreciate you feel you can trust ...


0

"Hey, I'm sorry to tell you this but I can't help you anymore. I really need to enjoy my free time and not think about work at all before I can start again. It might sound selfish to you, but this little break is really important to me and to my health. I hope you understand." If she doesn't understand, cut her off. You don't want a needy friend ...


3

Besides the specific on how to respond this request (I partly agree with Dan's answer), the most important lesson to take home, in my opinion, is the following: As a manager always offer a rationale behind any request. If you don't currently manage people, maybe you will in the future and you will ask stuff to your collaborators very often. It's very ...


5

Can someone tell if my statement is really that offending? No it's not particularly offensive as it stands. He may feel his authority is being questioned, but I don't see it as a big deal. I think you're both overdoing it.


5

Quick side note: managers usually check addresses at the start of the FY (which is usually end of January or November timeframe) and one of their task is to verify the HR address data is correct for their employees. I'm 90% certain this is what your manager is trying to do. Let me first say it's always impolite to ask a question to answer a question. It's ...


-11

The reason is because you referred to him by name without an honorific or by his title. You should have referred to him as Sir John, Boss John, Supervisor John, Superior John, or his title such as Mr. Supervisor or Supervisor. This shows a severe lack of respect for his authority and is very disrespectful.


0

I found a job I am interested in and I have some deal-breaker questions I want to ask before applying (example: if they offer relocation, remote work, visas). I tried to find the answers on their site/internet without success. Frame challenge: maybe they originally weren't planning to offer these, but if you convince them that you're the candidate they ...


3

Deal with Jane. My gut tells me I should ask the important questions to Joe, considering they may be an opener to create a connection that could help me land the position I'm sorry to break it to you, but your desire to ask someone else simply isn't relevant here. Here's how I'd characterize what has transpired so far: You contacted the company and asked ...


-1

If you really feel that Jane may not be able to really answer the questions, then I would suggest that you send the questions to Jane, but CC Joe. In this way you'll be able to get the answer you want and mitigate the insult to HR. As long as Jane replies with Joe still on the email, you can be assured that he (she) agrees with the response, otherwise would ...


3

Even though Jane is not the one responsibile for the position, she still works with Joe and her impression of and interaction with you may be relayed to Joe anyway, and may even make you stand out as a candidate by expressing enough interest to reach out. She's willing to answer the questions you want answered, she seems positive about the interaction, and ...


11

Just ask Jane all the questions. Either she can answer them all, in which case great. Or some of them she'll have to defer to Joe, in which case you get your introduction. Win-Win either way.


42

First rule: don't insult HR. Jane is offering to help. She's fully able to answer all of the questions you need answered now. You've already admitted that any questions she might not be able to answer would be reasonable to ask at the interview, and the answers she's able to give are sufficient to tell you if it's worth taking the interview or not. So... ...


62

Jane should be able to answer your questions since: Jane & Joe have the same role as well as seniority Your questions are rather general ones than specific to the position Jane agreed to communicate and is keen on answering your questions ..so you should go with that.


6

This issue is quite common in my workplace, even more when we were still working in the office and often moving between meeting room would require 5+ minutes of walking if the rooms were far apart. Based on how I handle the situation when it happens to me, I think you have to make a distinction between the colleague being late annoys you but has no impact ...


24

First of all, stop waiting for the meeting to happen for 10-15 minutes. A minute or two is understandable, but stop waiting for 10-15 minutes. If the attendee(s) have not shown up, drop off from the meeting, and send a note that due to missed presence, you are dropping off. If you allow them to be arbitrarily late into a meeting (without a prior notice / ...


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