New answers tagged

6

Your instincts served you well here - there's no real benefit to you allowing the recruiter to "represent" you in this one. Quite the reverse in fact - and the same goes for the company as well. Many recruiters operate on a commission-like model where they get paid either a fixed amount or percentage of a new hire's wage once the hiring goes through. In ...


-1

You already did the right thing by informing your recruiter about the application you submitted on your own. Let them judge that's best and act accordingly: if they think they should tell the company about you, so be it. Having your application backed up by the recruiter can only improve your chances of getting hired. It shouldn't reduce the offered salary, ...


2

The answer is "it depends". Usually this isn't a great idea. On the other hand, if the company has passed on you or has been slow to respond, it couldn't hurt. I once applied for a job and received no response. A recruiter contacted me about the job several weeks later, and I explained that I had already applied. He called the company and found that ...


3

it was a role that I've already applied to. Unless you have a prior communication with the recruiter, and the recruiter with the company, before you applied to this position, I don't see a way of the recruiter benefitting from your candidature. This is because a recruiter gets paid once you are selected, and even if you get through, the company can always ...


9

Is this true? Based on my experience as a hiring manager - no. I would definitely not allow a recruiter to present my credentials to a company I am already working with. In the past, it was annoying to have a candidate presented by a recruiter and then already be in our system via their own efforts. It came across as desperate. Another point to consider ...


1

I suggest looking at it from the perspective of what is best for you. If failure by the company to make accommodations for your disability could end up being bad for you, it's probably best to disclose it before accepting the job. Maybe after interviewing and being offered the position, if you don't feel it will have a significant impact on your work when ...


4

You obviously care about both your employer as the client you are working for. You want to share this information with your employer, without breaking the trust of your B-manager. This seems like a win-win situation to me, where the relationship between your employer and client will improve if said annoyances are fixed. You mention having a casual ...


3

I'm working in the exact same kind of situation as you, except insofar as I have a good relationship with my managers at my employer and generally meet them at least once a month. At our company, it's my duty to let my manager know of any issues with the client, whether good or bad. In your situation, I'd tell them just what the client told me, including ...


0

It could be a good idea depending on a couple of things. How good is your relationship with the sales person? are they likely to take offense to the idea that someone doesn't like them? or react negitively to critisism? do you think these critisisms are fair and resonable or was the manager just whining? if you think these are genuine critisisms, that ...


5

Things being as they are, the consultants here are way closer to B than the A-salespeople and hear a lot of things on the client side. I also have a casual relationship with my direct B-manager (on the client side) and we're able to have friendly conversations. Both of these things are pretty common, especially in long term engagements. I feel like ...


3

If you have been introduced to any worker, not just the CEO, it's perfectly fine to say hi, and would be considered rude in some circumstances not to. But what matters greatly is the context, and indeed the manner in-which you communicate. You can't walk into a meeting, look across the room and greet the CEO. You also should refrain from seeking them out, ...


1

Yes, but with a clear intent and very briefly. The most important resource for higher ups in most companies is their time, and they tend to value it, and value people who respect it. They do not have much for office chit chat. So, if after 4-5 weeks, you want to "touch bases", you can send something along the lines of Dear Boss, I Hope you are all ...


9

It would seem strange for you to knock on the door of their office and intrude if they're working. However, it should be fine to say "Hello" or "Good morning" if you happen to pass in a corridor. He might well remember you and you can then thank them for hiring you if the conversation allows. Don't expect that they'll remember you (and don't be offended ...


1

I'm going to give you an answer for one specific facet of your question: that they can't replace you. Nope. You're not irreplaceable. It simply doesn't work like that, no matter what you might think. I know this, because I was that replacement once. I was hired to be the "Corporate Apps" person at a company. 'The' is the right word there - I was being ...


2

It's interesting that among all those answers from the manager, there was nothing like "If you stay here, we'll give you a promotion or at least a raise of ". That tells you right away how much they do (or don't) value you. If you're not worth a measly 10% (or whatever other amount that's not insignificant) raise to them, then why do you worry so much about ...


4

What to write in place of "your company" or "this company" when it is not a company(not pvt ltd, llp or inc, or such) but a proprietorship? Considering all your examples are about writing a letter to this "company", you can just give the "company" name instead and avoid all ambiguity. You're not trying to keep it a secret! If you want to keep it a secret ...


0

An old saying where I live says something like 'everybody is useful but nobody is indispensable': they will replace you. Also, this does not need to be a negotiation, there is no need to explain or expand on any issue, reason, whatever. Be kind but firm and just hand them your notice, fulfill it to the letter working hard or even harder and that's it. ...


1

They are trying to sell you on the benefits of a startup, which are valid - being lead person when there’s growth does mean a chance at a lot more opportunity than you’ll have at a “desk job”. But there are downsides too, and you are wanting something more traditional where you can learn more from others, that’s fair. I had a friend recently leave a just-...


1

Let's break this down a bit, to the points your manager made: Our company will grow a lot, we're aiming to do stuff which other companies are doing not so good! Almost all companies aim to grow. Your manager has no idea what other companies are aiming to be doing in a year, or how well they'll be doing them, so this is unsubstantiated. In my opinion ...


17

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


7

They are playing the guilt card pure and simple. They are not always to be believed, you only have to read several other posts on here that say “I was promised X... and it never happened” The CEO gives the excuse well the market did not pan out... So, you need to focus on your aspirations and reasons and make the move best for you. Ignore the guilt card...


0

To answer the question as asked: you should not have forwarded any company document to a former employer, without approval. Since you have done it, you now need to mitigate the effects: report the error in an appropriate manner. There are few circumstances in which an employee will be sacked if they admit to a mistake. In fact, even if the ...


3

Without going into your actions, its obvious you know you have messed up. So, I would simply weigh up your options. And you have 2 really: Own up, with a risk of getting sacked. Keep quiet with a risk of getting found out, and sacked Personally I think there is more at risk with option 1. I have in the past kept several spreadsheets I worked on from ...


6

There's multiple factors here that are working against you in this situation, some are things you can control (if you choose) and others aren't: You're having an effect on people's finances that the perceive negatively: I noticed that previously before I joined, the claims for mileage, annual leave etc, has been processed daily.. but when I came in, I ...


8

Any company I've worked in, your action would be reason to terminate your employment and take legal action against you for breach of confidentiality agreements, non-disclosure agreements, and document security regulations. NEVER share information with people outside the company unless you are authorised to do so, and then only with people who are authorised ...


22

Ask your manager Consult with your assigned mentor/reporting manager, regarding whether and what you should put in your email signature. Since you are currently an intern, you may not be aware of the practises followed in the company. They will also assist you with any standard styling and fields to include in your email signature as most decent sized ...


2

It sounds like you don't know why they wanted it. Some of the other answers assume their motivation was shady, which may be an appropriate assumption, or it may not be. If they were really trying to do something shady, would they have asked you at all? You should probably ask them why they wanted it, and ask them to keep the document confidential. Best ...


26

Obviously you did the wrong thing, and the only question is whether you should own up to your mistake, or lie low and hope nothing bad happens. The other answers tend to lean towards owning up, but I have to wonder: what planet are they on? On planet Earth, the obvious and only course of action is to say nothing. If you are found out, you can always plead ...


62

No, don't share internal company information with non-members of the firm except in the course of normal business. Previous employees do not have a legitimate interest in non-public company information (unless they are doing business with the firm). It doesn't matter how sensitive the information seems or if it is marked confidential - unless you have ...


53

No. It was a mistake. The deputy manager no longer works there, so he doesn't get to ask for any company documents. There is no reason to do this I can think of other than to somehow compete with your business. The correct action would have been to forward his request to your current manager, and forget about it. Now, mistakes happen, and the fact you're ...


121

You need to talk to your manager about this immediately. You absolutely should not have done this. This person is no longer an employee at your organization is not entitled to any company information. It doesn't matter that they may have helped create the documents and probably know the content anyway, sharing it with them essentially makes it a public ...


1

1st question: It is ethical. Only unprofessional. May ring an alarm bell. 2nd question: No, it's unjust, unethical, and must ring an alarm bell. 1st: Although a true professional company would never ask such a thing, some rapidly growing companies, while trying to be professional, may act completely unprofessional. As long as it works for both sides, it's ...


6

Good on you for figuring out there is something wrong with you. Good on you for not acting on your impulses. But if you are concerned you should really find a professional to help you address it. It doesn't matter if its normal or if other people get it. You know its an issue you have. Step up and seek help on fixing it. So while you are in the process of ...


17

When I was a younger teenager I had urges to basically follow girls who I liked. (...) I can't stop thinking about women when I'm near them (...) I am very distracted by things like, the sound of high heels, or women's voices. Sorry for the blunt response, but that is in no way normal IMHO (especially urges to follow random girls), and the best advice ...


6

As Joe says in the comments, are you working with a mental health professional? If not, you need to so you learn some coping strategies, so that you can focus on work, not on the people at work. Women at work expect their male co-workers to consider them peers, not women. It's very important that you find ways to get to that mind-set, because without it, ...


1

Just at face value of what happened, your company should replace your mouse with a standard mouse or reimburse you the value of a standard mouse. The damage that befell your mouse was reasonably the type of damage / scenario that a company signs up for by providing equipment. The cost of that damage was not. You have made the decision to increase the ...


1

What ways can I ask my boss to not let this happen again? To turn things around a bit, it would be better if you approached the coworker instead. You felt bad when this person "went behind your back", so it is ok for you to express that in a polite way. Approach them, and tell them such, and that in future situations it would be best if they are clear ...


1

I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it. The potential employer even acknowledged it. The commonly accepted practice is that merely having an offer does not stop you from interviewing with others, but this is the dividing line: after you have accepted the offer and the potential employer acknowledged it, ...


3

Talk to your boss about it. He/she likely realizes this worker has the issues you identified and takes her input with a grain of salt. Get his/her input on how to handle the situation, explaining what you have told us. Keep in mind there may be a sliver of truth to the feedback she's giving. I hate to be THAT guy, but I noticed several typos and ...


0

Unless you're being directly blamed or have the direct responsibility for the failure, it doesn't make sense to draw a target on your back making upper management aware of your boss' ignorance. This can easily be misconstrued in a variety of ways that would make you a malcontent even if you were 100% correct. In my experience, it's always been a good thing ...


2

Depending on the company culture, moving can make a good team-building event. In this case, pizza payment is adequate and can even be supplemented unofficially with a bottle of beer. It may equally well not fit in the "team-building" frame.


0

Do you have a copy of that email? Be ready to produce it. I wouldn't go running to upper management with it, but if asked, you need to be able to show that you warned your manager about it. If asked, admit openly that you knew hardware was a possible issue, and you warned management of it some time ago.


10

I'm currently a software developer who was once a computer repair tech, who also had to take day labor jobs in college, so I have (maybe) a unique perspective on this, as I have worked several sides of this question. As day labor, I have helped set up cubicles and other furniture in an office environment, as well as moved furniture for large and small ...


17

Whenever you are in a situation where sh*t has hit the fan and people are asking questions, just be factual. When they ask what happened, say that the server failed. When they ask if you knew it was going to fail, say yes. When they ask if you did anything to prevent it, say yes. When they ask what you did to prevent it, show your papertrail/suggestions, ...


4

It is ethical to ask employees to do minor jobs which are not part of their job description. Employers can ask an engineer to answer the phone and take messages for the boss if nobody else is in the office, they can ask a programmer to talk to customers as a sales rep, and so on. The two requirements are that the job truly is minor in relation to other tasks ...


6

Is not ethical at all, in fact it is dangerous. This young friend died moving furniture: https://vejasp.abril.com.br/cidades/aluno-usp-morre-asfixiado-armario-poli/


-3

They asked you to voulunteer. They are not forcing you do it so its not unethical. Voulunteering shows that you value the success of the company, which may make a good impression on your boss. Also if you help participate in the setup then you might get to have some input on where everything goes. If its just regular furniture then I don't see how its ...


0

If you have a friend that is in your same field and is very knowledgeable. Send them the job description for the job you want. Ask them to read it over, and then set up a phone call and pretend to interviews for that job with your friend. This will help you prepare and your friend will be able to provide you with honest helpful feed back.


1

In every office I've worked in, people used water bottles or some form of spill-proof/resistant cups. Probably for that reason. Does your work not have some form of policy like that? Having said that, I'd look at it the same as if he came to your house and spilled a glass of water on your desk at home, ruining your mouse. A nice person might offer ...


3

There's a lot of subtlety in this subject, and some of it will vary with cultural or job-specific differences. That said, in general, the best rule of thumb is to actively pursue all options until you've made a firm contractual commitment to a new employer. On the one hand, until you've made a firm commitment, you never know what could happen - a "likely" ...


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