New answers tagged

6

So I said yes to him while still looking for other opportunities. How do I tell my manager that I am no longer interested in the role that he offered me? Is there anything I could have done to be more transparent and professional? I'm assuming that you accepted the new role without saying that you would still keep looking elsewhere. Doing so ...


3

He is sure to be very disappointed. I am not so sure about. The job that you really wanted is not there anymore. It is normal to think about a decission even though after "accepting it". Remember what you said: which while being a okayish role, was not the "dream role" that I joined this company for. You are the one that matters here! I think it is ...


0

There are already good answers, but this is a different approach for your consideration. Take the position that the call center operator has too much work to handle the new leads in a timely manner. As evidence, present logs of leads you have given her and when, if ever, they were called. There is also a bus factor problem with having only one person who is ...


1

I am hard of hearing as well. I started to lose my hearing as a young child and never had an issue until my mid 20s. I am like you where I require subtitles or closed caption to hear/understand movies. I decided to go see an audioist about my hearing and got hearing aids. It has vastly improved my overall well being. It used to be crowded rooms were hard to ...


0

I agree with sf02 that turning off the camera mid-interview is a bit inappropriate, but the same is not true for turning the camera ON near the beginning of the interview. It is common for people to join a conference call with voice/video disabled, then to turn it on once the meeting starts. So, the interviewee probably won't even realize you were ...


0

I decided to provide another answer despite there being already several of them, because they all missed a crucial point. I had not before because I was afraid I could not articulate it properly. However, having just watched this video, I remembered this question, and came back to write this answer, as I find this video to be good prompt, and a perfect ...


2

I'd like to be able to show some projects to my future employer so they can get a grasp what I can do. That is tricky. If you come with the code from home, how will the employer know that you actually created it? If the employer wants to see you writing code, then they will ask you do undergo some programming test. They would get much more valuable ...


1

The other answers concentrated on dealing with the final, visible result. I will try to go to the core of it. I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders ... As a manager, among other things, you do two things: make decisions; assign tasks; Orders are given by dictators or by people in military-like organizations. Stop giving orders, nobody ...


0

This is an addition to the other answers that have been made so far, and concerns some important things to do once you will have started working elsewhere (which you probably will). Don't try to hide what you have been doing in your new job, be the master of your narrative. Nurses' world is a small world, and soon or late your new colleagues will know ...


0

It wouldn't hurt to give your resume or business card. Come dressed professionally. My advice if you want to appeal to companies is to go to hackatons. I assume you're into the IT field since you want to ask the CTO about jobs. At my company, they hired folks right on the spot at such an event. Of course you have to come to impress.


3

Part of the interview process is for people to see each other. The reason for this is so that they can judge how they answer questions, deal with surprises, verify good hygiene, know who they interviewed so they know who to expect on the first day, make sure they dressed appropriately, and more. With the recruiter having their camera off, they did you a ...


13

Should I let my camera on even if the person I am chatting with is not using one? Is it considered rude/unprofessional to turn off the camera? Whether you decide to interview with or without the camera, the decision should be made before the interview. Once you have started the interview, it would be inappropriate to turn off the camera regardless of ...


15

Quite often you don't need a (public) portfolio as a programmer/developer. You can show where you've worked. You can talk the talk and walk the walk when it comes down to having conversations about Microsoft Dynamics AX programming. That alone tells a future employer a lot (at least, at the technical interview if a technical person is not present during ...


4

All of the other answers are good advice in general for an employee that is not following orders. However in view of you special circumstances - her being the owner's sister in law - I would talk to your boss first. Your conversation should be something like: "Hey boss, have we been told to give X any special treatment, or should we treat her like any ...


1

I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders, she does not follow on this specific topic. Keep a written record of your orders. Roleplay what she needs to say to those people. Stay on her until she does what you demanded. Stay in the same room, wear earplugs if you have to. Buy/rent/license some call center software/cloud solution that records and ...


15

It seems you have wasted a lot of time wondering on "if"s and "but"s and did not take a stand on your decisions. In other words, they undermined your authority and decision, because you allowed them to do so and get away with it. I'm sorry, but at times, you need to take hard decisions to ensure that the protocols are followed and the work is delivered. ...


2

I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders, she does not follow on this specific topic. She says she has better calling lists, which are old patients (+4 years without any purchase) and partnered elderly homes databases. You are not giving orders (a bad phrasing IMHO). You are giving her suggestion that she is free to ignore. If she is free ...


4

Yes, it's appropriate to ask about employment (politely). One reason executives come to university campuses is to promote their companies as good places to work. You can certainly mention that you like what the company's doing, and you sent in an application. Be prepared to answer the question "what do you like about us?" and have a short intelligent ...


4

While conference systems might be under-quality sometimes (we've all had these situations throughout the years), what you describe seems to be a "personal" problem. My best advice is to have a meeting with your doctor so he can recommend you the good path to proceed. At the minimum, you should have an audiogram done. You might be able to hear most of the ...


2

Say nothing until you schedule unless you trust these people incredibly If a team member quit with two weeks notice, your team would need to deal with it (and finding a replacement can easily 8-12 weeks anyway). If a team member had a heart attack and were not in the office tomorrow, your team would have to deal with it. If your team cannot handle that, ...


2

The CTO is not responsible for your application, except at very small companies (for example at my current company the CTO is also the hiring manager for all dev positions so he does know these things, but this is the exception not the rule). So I wouldn't ask him directly about your application in particular, because he does not know, nor does he care (he ...


10

Would it be appropriate to talk to the CTO about my application? How should I bring up the topic? Most likely the CTO does not know how the current state of applications to their company is (as those are not a CTO's tasks, and are more appropriate for HR or Recruitment Manager). Thus, asking him about how your application is going may come up as out of ...


0

This sound fairly typical of a startup company and particularly a startup tech company founded by someone who has no idea how technology works. As a result, your problems can more or less be solved by educating the founder ("CEO"), providing he is willing to learn. Regarding asking you for features but described very vaguely: Explain that he (the CEO) ...


0

I must add that I'm actually a freelancer but my assignment evolved in me working long term fulltime for this sole client so the way I'm working could be compared to an employee really. You are a freelancer. You should have a contract. The terms of your contract should specify the length of the contract, deliverables, how to extend it, or how to provide ...


1

What you've described is every small company I've ever worked for. Sure they didn't all have all of those problems. As I grew professionally, I learnt not to see problems and annoyances, but opportunities and was able to apply the maxim "if you touch something, make it better than it was". Now I'm working with mainly legacy stuff, fixing tedious problems ...


0

Any reason is a valid reason is it's something you care about. However it doesn't mean you can't improve the situation. What you need to reflect upon is: Did I try to improve the situation and how? Am I satisfied with the actions that have been put in place to improve the situation or do I foresee any improvement in the near future? Why do I care about ...


1

Some words: estimating; planning; prioritizing; tracking; reporting; It is quite obvious that your manager does not understand very well the stress he lays on you. So you can handle it by doing it yourself. Maintain a clear list of things you have to do. For each item, make a break-down structure (WBS) if it more complex. For each item and each element in ...


0

If you’re going to consult a professor, ask your boss for a consultation budget first. Many professors, when asked for assistance for someone from industry, will respond with something like, “Sure, I’d be happy to help you out. My consultation fees are $X hundred/thousand per hour.” Needless to say, asking the professor and then balking at the fees will ...


1

Based on your comment reply, you do not know the actual professor. All of these answers assume you know the professor and that you are trying to ask your boss. I feel the first step is to contact the professor to see if he is even willing to help out someone who is not taking any of his classes, possibly not even attending the college/university (assuming ...


1

It is the safest to ask your boss. BUT, you can avoid asking your boss, and still be as safe. It all depends on how you interact with the professor. Not OK: Hello professor, we are just inventing a device which ... (something), and I need your support with ... (whatever) OK: Hello professor, I am faced with a problem at work. While dealing with a ...


12

Is it legal/wise to ask for example a professor of that particular field a roadmap to solve the problem, when data has been anonymized? If not, what should a worker do? You should ask your boss, and explain to them as you did here that certain level of knowledge is required to complete the project, and what can you do to get that knowledge. You boss will ...


0

The professional thing to do is to keep your new employer informed of all the advice your doctor gives you as well as what you decide to do in accordance with that advice. Since you haven't even started, asking for a temporary remote position might be a tough sell, but it's worth asking for. You can still do 1-on-1 learning though conference calls and video ...


0

Same here last month with my raise after probation, written in my contract. But instead of contacting my boss I went straight to HR next time I was in office. There, I did not talk about an "error". I simply showed her my contract and asked as innocently as possible where I'd have to go to get the promised raise. I asked if I'd have to have a one-on-one-...


-1

If I were in your shoes, I would try to be a lot less blunt and a little more personal, no matter who is being addressed. Hi, X. How is Project Y coming along? You can also give your reason for asking for a status update: Hi, X. What stage are we at with Project Y? I need something to feed back to Person Z If you are asking about a delayed project: ...


1

You should ask for status update in such a way that it shouldn't sound impolite to the receiving person irrespective of whether they are a fellow employee, manager or client. This is how I usually deal with it. Hi Jay, Did you get a chance to try out the solution for the above error? Please let me know in case of any queries with the solution ...


9

If it were me I would wait until the next pay cycle. If it still isn't reflected in your pay then I would simultaneously address it with your boss and with your HR department. Make sure that your raise is retroactive to the date it was supposed to be reflected in your pay.


-8

The professional thing is to keep personal issues from affecting your work as much as possible. So my first recourse would be to talk to the doctor. Explain your situation and see if there is anything that can be arranged. I'd go see another doctor if the first can't solve issues like this. After that you can move forwards depending on the doctors advice.


16

Accepted a job in a new city, but then badly injured my leg. My doctor told me not to move now. What does professionalism require? Professionalism requires that you follow your doctor's directions. Give your new employer the worst possible April estimate (or a May estimate in case it takes you a couple of weeks to move cities once you're able to). ...


28

Given the way your issue has been handled by each company, I'd be revisiting the decision to leave. A supportive company is often worth more than a couple of dollars in the paycheck.


3

If I'm not mistaken, you need the relieving letter to start at any new place of employment. The fact is, if the above is stated in your relieving letter it would definitely reflect negatively upon you. Even if you were mentally sick, chances are that local laws protect you from people divulging this information. Your best course of action is to consult a ...


0

Don't be afraid to talk to them about overdue invoices. Be firm and do not bring your personal condition or concerns (like "paycheck to paycheck") into the discussion. Always work under a legal contract. My usual contract states that the client does not own the code until all invoices are paid in full. Put your terms on every invoice. My typical terms ...


0

Rough napkin math: They owe you $11k, at $70/hr. $11000/70 = 157 hours, or roughly 4 weeks (at 40 hours per week), or roughly 1 month. Check your contract. On what schedule does it say you should be paid? If it says monthly, I'm not sure you have a case. If it says less than monthly, you have a problem. Here's the problem: They are paying you, yes, but ...


2

This is a bit more general than your current situation, but I think it generally fits. You need to get a lawyer draw up a proper enforceable contract for any future employment that includes Clear rules on when payment happens (bound to deliverable or monthly independent of whether you deliver on time) Clear rules on what happens if payment is not on time, ...


30

Living paycheck to paycheck on contract work is nuts I am 26 and this is my first contracting experience. I was not the first to be late (me being late on deliverable items, my employer being late on invoice payments). Living paycheque to paycheque at the time, and still am, this is a serious issue for me. I was in dire straights at the time... So you'...


2

Can you do the demo without giving them the code? This would show you have the work done. If they ask for the code, you say "we should talk about the payment issues first". Be firm, state that you have done your part and you need them to do theirs. Otherwise it makes no sense for you to put more effort into the project. Be polite and nice. If the issue of ...


0

Does this risk being too formal? The risk isn't so much that you'll come across as too formal. Using reasonable formality is generally always the safer bet when communicating in the workplace. The risk is that this is unreasonable formality. The formality in itself isn't the problem - it's that you're using it inappropriately and excessively, and it's ...


3

In addition to other answers here, I will add that this is a normal situation in companies. It is a pain for us as contractors. But that is why in the future you must add a clause to the contract, such as: Invoices shall be paid within fifteen (15) days of receiving it by email or in person, otherwise interests will apply starting from day sixteen (16) at ...


1

If there's a pattern with the other people invited - they're managers (and you're not), they're department heads (and you're not), they're from specific parts of the organisation (and you're not) - there's no need to feel hurt by this. You could even reframe it. Your boss made a list of the people she wanted to invite - people she regarded as important - ...


5

You say your invoice has not been paid for two weeks. Unfortunately for you, that's a common situation. It is probably not due to dissatisfaction with your work, but to a business process at your customer company's accounts-payable department. In the USA anyway, many companies pay invoices "net 30", meaning they pay 30 calendar days after the invoice is ...


2

The use and contents of a signature block has lately been directed by corporate policy. The company I work for has specified that the signature block appear in both new messages and replies. They have dictated the information they want us to include in our signature block. Other than corporate policy there is no standard. Some never include a signature ...


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