New answers tagged

1

I wouldn't take this as an insult at all. If they had a serious issue, they wouldn't be offering this, they'd be giving something like a "performance improvement plan," or you might even just be laid off given how new you are. If they're at all aware of the issues you were having, they're probably just giving you exactly what you need. And even if ...


7

This is a great opportunity: Make the project manager your resource! Call out the blockers to the project manager and give him responsibility to get them unblocked. That's actually a large part of his role. For example, if the "senior" developers are not being helpful, make it his job to adjust their attitude.


1

It's a little unorthodox that they want to meet with you and you alone rather than have the PO, your Scrum master, you, and your team in a daily meeting routine. This is how things are done in Lean teams and SCRUM methodologies. It's known as a daily scrum, but scrum masters aren't required to attend. You may want to investigate if there's a way to transform ...


4

Force them to check in with you daily Make your demands during the daily check-ins. Keep repeating them. A bit tongue-in-cheek, but as others have said, if you turn this around in your head to think of it, this may be helpful. Most jobs suck because we can't talk to people in a position of power who can change them. Luckily for you, you are in a different ...


47

I'll take a bit of a different answer: this isn't necessarily something you should worry about. Let me give you an example why. Our company is working on a critical business project. And the group I'm in is one of the critical teams on that project, with a good possibility that we're on the critical path of the project - in other words, if our area gets ...


11

Forget about the insult, you may have a larger problem or a great opportunity. Virtually nothing in the workplace is intended to be rude, so taking it that way is not a reasonable thing to do. Yes, there are certainly jerks, but their motivations are rarely "I want to be a jerk today", so interpreting this that way gets you nowhere. You need to ...


74

Agree with the answer suggesting you turn this obnoxious requirement to your own advantage. They want to be told what your blockers are? Tell them your blockers. "We're falling behind the schedule because we're not receiving the support anticipated from the seniors." "We're short of resources for this project because DevOps is making ...


-1

I would consider myself to have essentially been put on a PIP, and unless I had some stock options or something, would just resign and find new job. The job market for experienced devs is white hot right now where I am, so I would just spend the weekend submitting job applications and then call in sick forever until they fired me. Wring an extra week of ...


1

Let me break this down into two different issues: your feelings about being asked to do the daily check in, and how you react to that request. Your feelings are. Feelings are morally neutral. They are connected to who you are. Thus, feeling that you are being singled out is a valid feeling. However, what to do about this situation is a totally different ...


121

While this is a counterproductive step as framed, it’s more effective to lean into it than fight it. You admit to a litany of errors in the first sprint, so responsible management has to look more closely into the situation somehow even if this isn't the way you'd prefer. This is an opportunity to align better with expectations and make a good impression ...


0

What is the alternative that is better? This is a key part of how I make decisions. Is there an alternative that overall, with all its advantages and tradeoffs, that puts me in a better position than before? You could just tag him as unreliable and act accordingly. I have had co-workers who didn't do things, so I put check-ins in my calendar to deal with it....


7

Bring it up to your management team or whomever is responsible for their contract. You're responsible for the success of a project, and if the person you're working with isn't bringing you into the loop or is boxing you out of those kind of important conversations, then it makes your job a lot harder to determine if the project is on track or if it's ...


1

As lead you should give him some feedback. In the future, don't count on him to setup meetings. As lead you need to address his performance issues, one of which is not inviting you. At the very least, you need to have a 1 on 1 chat. Explain the consequences for the team because he didn't do this, what to do next time. Because I wasn't in the meeting I ...


1

There is no standard. Figure out what works for your org In my last organozation, there were dedicated QA testers to check things. In my current company, it is mostly unit tests and a little bit of developer testing. At a company a friend was at, bugs were not really given much thought and just fixed as found/complained about. Another friend is currently are ...


0

We usually find that the code deployed has some errors, is it the job of other departments to verify that everything is working properly or is it the job the IT department to do the quality check and check their own work? It depends on the company. Managers and bosses should have documentation saying what the departments of the company are, and what each ...


2

There are lots of different ways to handle this, but the answer is usually that the responsibility to ensure that the software is correct belongs to both the IT department and the customer (in this case, the finance department). The outputs of software development processes are usually of higher quality if the stakeholder groups collaborate during the ...


5

So as a PM I see you having three problems. Modification to deliverable details without you being informed. Let them know what was decided is fine but the way it was decided negatively impacts you. Follow up with how you expect changes to deliverables to be processed in the future, confirm with the person receiving the documentation if there are any knock ...


7

I told John that I was fine that the team communicate internally and I encourage team work, but I need to be in the loop for any decision in order to be able to keep track and make sure everything is according to the plan This is very reasonable. Good job. I don't think John complained. (delivering this documentation on Monday could cause a delay), How so?...


1

I think that 'sf02' does point a good way forward for you now, but you did err very seriously by not immediately following-up with the client. Anytime you ask for input, you must make it clear "when and why you need it." You also need to maintain a written "contact log," and a reminder system. As soon as a contact is completed, ...


-1

This is the kind of a very tricky situation. Making a team of non-developers to write code is something you shouldn’t attempt, unless there you are not answerable to a client or you are working on an experimental project. Writing good code requires good experience, knack, decent coding instinct, and passion for writing code. Nurturing an ‘army’ of non-...


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