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If you are managing these projects and tasks in a team based environment, you could consider using Stack Overflow for Teams which allows you to use this same Q&A format to manage internal knowledge and information. You could use it in combination with Trello and Slack to manage your work. Good luck!


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What would you want a subordinate colleague to do if they were in your situation and you were managing them? There is your answer. It sounds like you are already thinking along these lines, which is good.


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I'm a project manager and a developer so I'll provide a response from both perspectives. As a pm it's my role to get a clear definition of scope and requirements and map out a plan to determine how to deliver on those and flush out any risks and issues as early as possible. I generally start by meeting with key stakeholders and getting as clear a steer as ...


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The other answer addressed the plain reading of your question, mine will address a reading that is a little different. If you are doing as well as you state, your next most logical role is one in which you are expected to lead others. You state you're not a strong programmer, which isn't a requirement to make sure projects are implemented on time and with ...


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If you don't think you can complete a project in the time allocated, it is professional to raise this with your supervisor as soon as you determine this is the case. From time-to-time, these things happen. It can be hard to gauge the strengths and weaknesses of new hires, and a good company will tailor the workload in order to get the best outcome. The ...


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How do I communicate this with the internal and external stake holders as a project manager? First, you need to follow up with the client and get the required data. After you have acquired this data, speak with all the stake holders and let them know that the project will not be completed by the current timeline and propose a new timeline. In the future, ...


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Make a backlog and ask for input on prioritizing it. It sounds like they need your help in knowing what needs doing, and you need their help knowing what is most important to them. This is fairly typical for an organization, although in larger organizations you probably wouldn't be so central to the process so soon. So first make a backlog. This is just a ...


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There is a huge difference between knowing what you're doing in IT and knowing what your employer is doing in IT. Your question does not describe a lack of skill or knowledge in IT subjects, it points out a lack of expressed goals by your employer. "I was hired as an expert of the field and I should know what is my objective at work." This would be true ...


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If your boss or manager wants to do some programming, there is no reason to try to stop them. If they want to do some programming, and expect it to go into the company's products or production code, and if it is your responsibility that your products or production code are of high quality, then their code must be reviewed, and rejected if it has problems, ...


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If you're looking for assurances that you're entitled to tell you boss what to do because it's your domain and it's his problem you're going to be disappointed. He's putting you in an awkward position and there's no easy way out for you. If you have a mature development team with proper testing, code reviews and automation then you're somewhat protected ...


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Not a programmer, but I had a boss (I work in Supply Chain, Purchasing) who oversaw, purchasing, logistics, customs and internal transfers (basically our internal supply chain). He wanted to learn how to purchase. So what we did was gave him a "dummy" system (complete with the real reports) and let him fiddle and he then worked out the min/max, PO amounts, ...


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A healthy software development lifecycle will mitigate the pain of an unsupervised junior developer (which is what it sounds like your boss is) trying things out for the first time. An incomplete list of crucially important things to have are: Source control Unit tests Integration tests Automated functional tests A continuous integration server that ...


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Do I have the right to demand that he stay out of my projects due to fear he'll not know what he's doing? You could ask your boss that (which would be a bad idea) but at the end your manager is... well, your manager, so they can involve themselves as much as they want in the projects they give you. You say that you "fear he'll not know what he's doing", ...


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This is a tough situation to be in. What I have heard from recruiters (and the experiences of friends and relatives has confirmed this) is that in the IT world any employment gap of longer than two months in your resume will cause prospective employers to shuffle you to the back of the pile. A six month gap sends you straight to the "round file". I've ...


1

If you are in the U.S., PMI certification is considered the gold standard for project management positions. If you choose option 1, I strongly encourage you to pursue PMI certification. If you do not have PMI certification, and you are competing with other applicants who do, it is very unlikely that you will be the most competitive application unless there ...


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Depending on where you are looking some companies have dedicated routes for those in their 40s to jumpstart their career. While I am not in your position, I am in the field and 10 months out can lead to you become somewhat behind with the trends. Many positions for part 1 would expect you to have the skills you outline in point 2, therefore if you are ...


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They might try to blame you, but it won't help them. It's the team leader's job to ensure that a mistake by a junior team member won't have a big impact, both by limiting your work to stuff you can do, and by checking it. He would effectively be saying "this person is new and terrible, but we gave him all the important work to do anyway, and didn't check it"....


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You can obviously get back to the 2. point, the thing is that you have to be able to show demonstred skills as a developer, no matter your experience (another problem can be that companies will consider a junior position only for fresh grades = lower salary, even if you are not asking for a high salary you might fall out of consideration). What I suggest ...


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You really can't ensure anything, especially that you're not blamed. All you can do is make sure to have a written record (emails) of all discussion, but that really only works for reasonable bosses, and in a court of law. The only advice that works: get outta there. Find a new job asap, and then, after you have a written and signed offer for that new job, ...


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I'm now afraid I will be blamed for the disaster, since I'm the new one. How can I secure that's not the case? It's not for sure that you will "be blamed" for this, so don't need to dread on this. When projects fail it's hardly just because of the action(s) of a single member, and in quite some cases due to poor management (except for the cases where the ...


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The short answer is: because software engineers dinking around for fun on the weekends isn't as marketable as you think. The first problem: greenfield development is the fun part of programming. But it's not what a programmer spends most of their time on. Instead of "Hey, build an app that takes data from an IoT device and uses it to send an email ...


2

This depends on how well you know your team. In some cases a team will have one particular member who can see a problem in a wholistic manner and formulate a viable solution in broad strokes very quickly. You want this chap/chappess on both problems. Other times you don't have anyone who stands out, so it makes more sense to split the team. Like anything ...


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Some sort of hybrid solution is likely to be effective. For example, you could split into two teams for the first 80 minutes to work on separate problems then re-assemble as a larger group and spend 15 minutes on each of the two problems to polish the solutions, leaving 10-minutes overrun time. The "correct" approach will vary depending on a wide range of ...


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