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1

The team appears to be unable to work Agile. Agile works with the right people, a good tech lead who is able to give clearly defined goals/tasks to junior staff, and you have good review processes in place. Drawing on history of failures may be good enough circumstantial evidence for some change. You may be most successful if you pick one area of the ...


1

In my experience, asking for refactoring time in the only purpose of refactoring, just isn't working. It will always be at the bottom priority of your PM, and there is no reason it should be otherwise: it doesn't bring cash, and a startup usually have very, very tight cash flow. Additionally, refactoring a code you didn't write and don't master, is very ...


3

Ah Agile, the notion that you should build a toilet before figuring out whether it is going in an outhouse in a forest or the bathroom of Bill Gates. I have seen startups do this successfully, but that was when there were 1-2 original developers who wrote every single line in the codebase. You could give them the url of an error as well as the error itself ...


4

I think that if they want to work this way, they need to understand that they're taking on technical debt, and features will get more expensive and the whole system will become unstable and buggy unless they invest time in refactoring. Sometimes the biggest unknown is what the customer really wants, the easiest way to discover it is to deliver a prototype. ...


14

Money! Try explaining that every unfinished feature, every untested add-on takes away more man-hours that have to be paid. Startup or no startup, piling up problems is never the way to go. Try making an example case of how you would organize fixing a specific problem and present that to the management.


3

Gather some numbers on how much time you're spending on these requests, how much time you're spending on other requests, and what other tasks are getting postponed and schedule a meeting with your boss. In that meeting, you want to have a conversation something like Hey Boss, I want to make sure that I'm being as productive as I can be. Over the ...


2

First thing, you should incorporate backlog into your workflow. Hopefully, you get comments in writing, then you can just copy-paste them in something like Trello or Google Doc. backlog in this case is just a list of tasks you have to finish. After you have some history accumulated, you can sit down and discuss how to better prioritize these items, because ...


6

The reason why you are asked to send the maps to multiple people is to receive different perspectives on how it could be improved. This specific boss seems to be only focused on the presentation rather than the content. His criticisms and suggestions are not necessarily a knock on your work, but suggestions on making the document more presentable for its ...


4

Kevin brought up the positive aspects of being involved with this project and person, so I'm going to cover the more pragmatic ones. These are some lessons that you wish to take to heart, or at least be aware of. You seem like a bright kid (anyone who starts programming at 10 probably is), and you'll find yourself running into this situations like these ...


2

I'm going to give you an answer you might not expect: Don't Worry About Success You're looking at all the downsides of the situation. Why not look at the positives? You're 16. If you fail this project, so what? I'd argue that failure might be the better outcome, because you'll probably learn more applicable lessons for the future from it. You're working ...


1

I am making some assumptions here, but make an appointment with your manager, as already stated in the comments, and prepare well for it. If I understand you correctly, it should be fairly easy to generate some numbers that will show that there's not much work in the project. Be it numbers of ticket, hours worked on tasks or else (I don't know your industry)...


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