676

he's made a point of cutting OT to nothing, focusing on his personal blog/LinkedIn to show off his knowledge, focusing on generic skills/abilities (at the expense of company-specific skills/technologies) and encouraging other engineers to do the same. So let me sum this up: you told your employee that the time he invests and the skills he brings do not ...


263

"today I learned it comes with 24/7/365 on-call to monitor mission critical systems. The first time I fail to fix it within 20 minutes, I will be fired" Then you have really nothing to lose. That's an absolutely ridiculous and outlandish requirement. No sleep, no vacation, no beer after work, no private life? Go back to your supervisor and tell them ...


204

Do not discipline him. He'll walk, and the company will have lost a very valuable asset. It seems to me the right answer here is for you to sit down with whoever you need to sit down with to get the rules bent in this case and to make it happen. You've got what sounds like a brilliant engineer, and you're trying to force them out of the company. The real ...


194

No, you should not tell anyone, and you should not attempt to hold it over his head. The first reason is a lot can happen in the next 60 days. He could choose to draw it out further, because the company delays his start date or that other position falls through. He could even decide that he does not want to take that opportunity. Even if these things seem ...


177

What the hell do I do now? I feel like I just got bait and switched and I want to go back to my old position. If that's the case, you should ask for a one-on-one meeting with your manager and express your feelings about going back to your old position. Make sure you first confirm that the flippant remarks you overheard were a real change and not just odd ...


150

Referencing an answer I put in another question: Does having two jobs simultaneously count for twice the experience? Your company assumes that you count each day as fully worked. You state that your employee put 15 hours a week of overtime. In four years, that's around 18 months of extra time. That could be counted toward his experience if your company ...


146

Should my manager be aware of me being offered opportunities to other companies? The short answer to this is no. The longer answer is that once you make that statement, you have essentially said "I am not happy here for whatever reason, and I am looking." Once you have implied this, it is really hard to take it back. Your best approach is to keep this ...


145

From your comments: Actually management has make promotion exam in english to enhance Englsh understanding better which helps to understand technical orders mainly in English This sounds to me as if there is a valid business reason why the role requires a decent understanding of English. Rather than arguing for an exception why not approach the worker ...


144

You will probably get answers telling you there is no need to catch up, which may be a valid point. However you are specifically asking to catch up so I will try to help. I took awhile to graduate from university, and in fact I did not start until I was out of high school for two years. I believe I am in a similar situation as you are. I graduated in ...


141

My possibilities would be threatening to leave (that is indeed possible) or to stop working overtime (not so easy). You're forgetting one possibility: you can refuse the promotion.1 A promotion should be treated like any other job offer and that means you need to negotiate salary. You seem to have missed an essential step in this entire process. Say the ...


138

How would you approach this with your manager? Talk with your manager directly about the best way to apply for the opening immediately. There is no reason you should have to wait, but you may as well double check with your manager to make sure there isn't something else you need to know as part of the internal application process.


131

What you are basically saying is "I want to continue to get more and more money without continuing to produce more value". I'm not saying you're not providing value as an individual contributor, but in order to continue to increase the value you produce, you have to provide some sort of leadership. Think of it this way, did you spring forth from your ...


125

Should I tell her that I'll be leaving shortly? No, you should just let things go as if nothing happened. After you have signed the new contract tell them that you are leaving. Even more, as long as you do not have a contract signed, you cannot know when you will leave, shortly or not. Otherwise, you risk that your future will not be very bright. If they ...


119

I know developers who successfully moved on towards a happier and more valuable developer career. They usually picked a special subject and worked to become an expert in that field. They also joined special projects that often lie outside of the classic corporate world. A few examples would be a friend who became a Linux developer joining RedHat, another ...


114

I don't see an overeager engineer, I see a disgruntled one. In this answer, I addressed a similar problem, but one that had gotten worse How can I deal with troublesome Professional Engineer? You have taught your formerly eager engineer that effort doesn't matter. He's put in 700K worth of overtime which he has not taken, and you think the problem lies ...


109

You need to treat this like a job interview. You are (presumably) going to be offered a new job. You know the demands of the job, and you need to decide what the conditions and compensation would be to make the job worth it to you. When you are approached, you say, "I am willing to consider this new position. I would need X, Y, and Z in order to be ...


104

This is one of those times when Gordon England's classic question would have been really useful. When they sprang the 24/7/365/"20 minutes"/"no backup personnel" story on you, you could have had a lot of fun by sitting silent for about five seconds, then asking "What will you do if I'm in the hospital?", and then SHUTTING UP. As it stands, I recommend, in ...


104

When a workplace is getting creative with the money it's a sign that unless you see it as a career company it's best to view it as a stepping stone.


90

Although I doubt if this is discrimination in a legal sense, that question is most properly asked in a legal forum, or with an attorney, not here. As far as discrimination in a professional sense - yes. According to Wikipedia, discrimination is "treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the ...


73

Would it be time-wasting to apply? Yes - you say yourself you don't want the role and want your boss to have it. Or is it an opportunity to increase my profile in the organization? Yes, but not in a good way - either you make it clear that you never wanted the position anyway (in which case you'll rightfully be seen as a timewaster) or you'll look like ...


71

will it be unprofessional for me to be absent during those crucial initial meetings? Or what if our CEO organizes an important social/teambuilding event for all senior employees during my holidays? Should I try my best to attend those specific situations, e.g. come to the office on that day just for the client meeting, go to the social ...


66

Short version : time to move on. The first time I fail to fix it within 20 minutes, I will be fired. The sort of condition written by a megalomaniac with no technical knowledge at all. Problem solving simply does not work this way. Your second sign you are working for an insane organization and, again, time to start looking for a new job. It can only ...


63

How is it unfair? Management needs to play organizational politics. Your refusal to play them (rather than diffuse them, or sell yourself in other avenues) pretty much spells out your lack of qualifications to be a manager. While you can choose to work for the new boss, or ask for a transfer, or look for new employment, the best thing you can do is learn ...


60

I would love to step back into my old role. How do I sell this to management? If you have a decent rapport with your boss, then you simply have an honest discussion. You talk about the stress of the job, and how you no longer wish to deal with it. You don't need to get into the reasons so much (now that I am financially stable, I don't need to put up ...


59

Why do you need to promote him to the supervisor's category? What you've said is that he's an excellent engineer. Great. He's also pretty bad at English. Okay. In his current position, his lack of ability at English isn't slowing him down. As a supervisor, it would be. Further, he has to know this. If he was really motivated to be a supervisor, he ...


58

Other than in exceptional circumstances, you're not going to get a promotion within weeks of starting a new role. You're not "competing" with your mentor for this role as it's just too early for you. Stop worrying about about this team lead and make sure you do the very best you can in your first weeks in your new job: there's no way you're ever going to get ...


58

Accept the promotion, the increased responsibility, and the lack of raise. Learn the new job (probably will take 6+ months). Once you're good at it you can look for a new job. Note @Kilisi's answer From the comments, @crueltear may have phrased it better: Accept the promotion, and look for job elsewhere (1 then 3)


53

Second answer that addresses the information you have added to the question since I last answered, as my answer now is very different. I found out today when my boss flippantly mentioned it in a conference call with several other managers. Specifically saying "We don't need to worry about the website, we have X on 24/7 on-call now." Managers often ...


52

The way to get rid of him is very simple: give him exactly what he asked for. Find an "engineering director" position which is 100% management (preferably, the most unpleasant aspects of management that exist in your organization) and appoint him to it. His much vaunted technical ability will then be of no use to him whatsoever. And keep his nose firmly ...


51

From a senior dev spot the options for better salary and moving up tend to be: Management - this includes Tech lead which is a management spot however low level. Specialization - this means becoming the expert in something, preferably expertise in something that multiple companies need. This can be going into architects jobs, or a big data specialization, ...


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