719

he's made a point of cutting OT to nothing, focusing on his personal blog/LinkedIn to show off his knowledge, focusing on generic skills/abilities (at the expense of company-specific skills/technologies) and encouraging other engineers to do the same. So let me sum this up: you told your employee that the time he invests and the skills he brings do not ...


319

People who are content with their job aren't going to ask you for a promotion - it might come up in their performance review, and they won't turn it down, but if they're happy where they are they're already happy. Generally you have four types of people who will come to you and actively ask for a promotion/raise: People who are looking to rise through the ...


262

"today I learned it comes with 24/7/365 on-call to monitor mission critical systems. The first time I fail to fix it within 20 minutes, I will be fired" Then you have really nothing to lose. That's an absolutely ridiculous and outlandish requirement. No sleep, no vacation, no beer after work, no private life? Go back to your supervisor and tell them ...


216

Do not discipline him. He'll walk, and the company will have lost a very valuable asset. It seems to me the right answer here is for you to sit down with whoever you need to sit down with to get the rules bent in this case and to make it happen. You've got what sounds like a brilliant engineer, and you're trying to force them out of the company. The real ...


195

No, you should not tell anyone, and you should not attempt to hold it over his head. The first reason is a lot can happen in the next 60 days. He could choose to draw it out further, because the company delays his start date or that other position falls through. He could even decide that he does not want to take that opportunity. Even if these things seem ...


178

What the hell do I do now? I feel like I just got bait and switched and I want to go back to my old position. If that's the case, you should ask for a one-on-one meeting with your manager and express your feelings about going back to your old position. Make sure you first confirm that the flippant remarks you overheard were a real change and not just odd ...


162

Referencing an answer I put in another question: Does having two jobs simultaneously count for twice the experience? Your company assumes that you count each day as fully worked. You state that your employee put 15 hours a week of overtime. In four years, that's around 18 months of extra time. That could be counted toward his experience if your company ...


156

How can I tell him that based on skills I don't see him as an appropriate candidate for the position in question without ruining our team spirit? You don't. You wish him good luck and that's it. It's not on you to to tell him you don't think he's qualified. Let him go through the interview process and for all you know he may surprise them. If you are ...


146

Should my manager be aware of me being offered opportunities to other companies? The short answer to this is no. The longer answer is that once you make that statement, you have essentially said "I am not happy here for whatever reason, and I am looking." Once you have implied this, it is really hard to take it back. Your best approach is to keep this ...


145

You will probably get answers telling you there is no need to catch up, which may be a valid point. However you are specifically asking to catch up so I will try to help. I took awhile to graduate from university, and in fact I did not start until I was out of high school for two years. I believe I am in a similar situation as you are. I graduated in ...


145

From your comments: Actually management has make promotion exam in english to enhance Englsh understanding better which helps to understand technical orders mainly in English This sounds to me as if there is a valid business reason why the role requires a decent understanding of English. Rather than arguing for an exception why not approach the worker ...


143

My possibilities would be threatening to leave (that is indeed possible) or to stop working overtime (not so easy). You're forgetting one possibility: you can refuse the promotion.1 A promotion should be treated like any other job offer and that means you need to negotiate salary. You seem to have missed an essential step in this entire process. Say the ...


138

How would you approach this with your manager? Talk with your manager directly about the best way to apply for the opening immediately. There is no reason you should have to wait, but you may as well double check with your manager to make sure there isn't something else you need to know as part of the internal application process.


135

TLDR version: You absolutely should give him this empty promotion with the promise that there will be a stated goal (and activity) towards making it not empty in the future. You should thank Gus for his honesty. You should be fighting to keep this guy for this kind of honesty. The fact that he feels safe enough to share these exact thoughts with you is a ...


130

What you are basically saying is "I want to continue to get more and more money without continuing to produce more value". I'm not saying you're not providing value as an individual contributor, but in order to continue to increase the value you produce, you have to provide some sort of leadership. Think of it this way, did you spring forth from your ...


125

Should I tell her that I'll be leaving shortly? No, you should just let things go as if nothing happened. After you have signed the new contract tell them that you are leaving. Even more, as long as you do not have a contract signed, you cannot know when you will leave, shortly or not. Otherwise, you risk that your future will not be very bright. If they ...


123

I don't see an overeager engineer, I see a disgruntled one. In this answer, I addressed a similar problem, but one that had gotten worse How can I deal with troublesome Professional Engineer? You have taught your formerly eager engineer that effort doesn't matter. He's put in 700K worth of overtime which he has not taken, and you think the problem lies ...


121

I know developers who successfully moved on towards a happier and more valuable developer career. They usually picked a special subject and worked to become an expert in that field. They also joined special projects that often lie outside of the classic corporate world. A few examples would be a friend who became a Linux developer joining RedHat, another ...


114

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


109

You need to treat this like a job interview. You are (presumably) going to be offered a new job. You know the demands of the job, and you need to decide what the conditions and compensation would be to make the job worth it to you. When you are approached, you say, "I am willing to consider this new position. I would need X, Y, and Z in order to be ...


105

This is one of those times when Gordon England's classic question would have been really useful. When they sprang the 24/7/365/"20 minutes"/"no backup personnel" story on you, you could have had a lot of fun by sitting silent for about five seconds, then asking "What will you do if I'm in the hospital?", and then SHUTTING UP. As it stands, I recommend, in ...


105

When a workplace is getting creative with the money it's a sign that unless you see it as a career company it's best to view it as a stepping stone.


91

If you want to actually take the promotion, discuss the problem with the manager suggesting you for the promotion. I would love to accept right now, but I have calculated that if I accept now, it would actually be a loss to me due to how we are changing to the new system next year. As I am committed to stay in the company long-term, that works out to a ...


90

Although I doubt if this is discrimination in a legal sense, that question is most properly asked in a legal forum, or with an attorney, not here. As far as discrimination in a professional sense - yes. According to Wikipedia, discrimination is "treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the ...


85

Figure out the exact motivations for this person There are many benefits that a C-Suite position might have over a non C-Suite one and most of those can be detached from the job itself. It could be recognition. It could be resume impact. It could be the influence they require to do their job with external people. It could just be something to brag ...


81

How do you take on less stress in a role than your predecessor did? Do not take your predecessor's role. Your boss in his attempt to convince you made it pretty clear that all the extra work and stress was normal and expected of the predecessor's role. He can say whatever he wants but the bottom line is if you accept this role you will likely face the ...


73

Would it be time-wasting to apply? Yes - you say yourself you don't want the role and want your boss to have it. Or is it an opportunity to increase my profile in the organization? Yes, but not in a good way - either you make it clear that you never wanted the position anyway (in which case you'll rightfully be seen as a timewaster) or you'll look like ...


71

will it be unprofessional for me to be absent during those crucial initial meetings? Or what if our CEO organizes an important social/teambuilding event for all senior employees during my holidays? Should I try my best to attend those specific situations, e.g. come to the office on that day just for the client meeting, go to the social ...


68

Speaking as someone who's been in a somewhat analogous situation to Gus here, denying them the promotion will make them much more likely to leave than just giving it to them. They want it. They've earned it. They're willing to compromise with the company given the situation (no salary increase) in order to get it. If they can't get it from your company then ...


66

Short version : time to move on. The first time I fail to fix it within 20 minutes, I will be fired. The sort of condition written by a megalomaniac with no technical knowledge at all. Problem solving simply does not work this way. Your second sign you are working for an insane organization and, again, time to start looking for a new job. It can only ...


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