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19

You're thinking of it as employees asking for handouts for no reason. Not at all. The raise request is a courtesy notice They are telling you that they are thinking about money and their market value, and they are either looking or already have found a better offer elsewhere. “I need a raise” - “No” - “Here’s my notice” ... is exactly the sequence you ...


1

The labour market is a market, even if it has some particular characteristics. Companies are usually not charities, they are buying labour. There is a negotiation going on between the employee and the employer: "For this amount of money and other perks, I will give you that amount of my time and effort." The market differs from buying apples in the ...


10

@Kayndarr's answer is good but misses an important category of people: People who have noticed that their pay is below market rate. All they have to do is check some job sites to see that they are under paid. If you don't offer them a promotion and/or raise they can quickly move on to somewhere that values them more appropriately. If you are seeing people ...


5

Probably. If they have explicitly asked for it, they presumably feel that their performance is deserving of it. It doesn't make any difference whether that opinion is accurate or delusional - if they feel they are operating at that level, chances are they are looking for an organisation who are willing to pay them that amount. Salaries and remuneration are a ...


47

Your compensation versus market rate The key conclusion from your observation "about 2 months after someone asks for a promotion or raise and does not get it, they are out the door." is that apparently the same people could get that promotion or raise in other companies; that you're seeing in practice that in general, "the market" is ...


311

People who are content with their job aren't going to ask you for a promotion - it might come up in their performance review, and they won't turn it down, but if they're happy where they are they're already happy. Generally you have four types of people who will come to you and actively ask for a promotion/raise: People who are looking to rise through the ...


1

I'm just not interested in taking on managerial responsibilities that I see as detracting from my professional development. I also have reservations about the team itself and my ability to effectively lead them given their relative inexperience. This are 2 separate issues. One is focussing where you think you are best. Technical skills and leadership skills ...


5

The only thing you can really do is stick to your guns that you don't want the promotion and would prefer to remain an engineer for now. That's what you're qualified for and advancing professionally as. It will then really come down to how much you're valued as an engineer. Which doesn't seem to be great. But you can't be forced to change roles. The danger ...


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