New answers tagged

1

Given that you are the 3rd person to join the company, I'd assume a good relationship with the CEO, and go direct to ask about the raise. Then make up my mind what to do after that. In the normal course of things you're definitely entitled to a raise. A lot depends on the type of startup, if it's a funding mine then they won't care. Usually you don't ...


6

Any suggestions on what I should do moving forward? Find a new company to work for. If the person responsible for giving you a raise became angry at the idea of giving you a raise and refused to give you a raise, that is a sign that you should not be working for your current company. Also, the fact that over the years you have been given additional ...


1

I understand you're bored, looking for more responsibility and looking for a bigger paycheck. Software architecture is one road. Management is another. Increased salary and being less bored are actually not directly related to either of those. "Managing a team of software engineers" is quite often not the same as "provide leadership and vision". Places ...


0

Could it be that you're trying to make too big of a jump at once? Without knowing the specific role requirements, but going from a Senior Engineer role into an advanced management role sounds like quite a leap. I know some places expect their Senior Engineers to have act as a mentor to Junior and Mid-level Engineers, but this is not the same kind of ...


8

The short answer is "Don't discipline him, reward him", but if you're going motivate him to move on, we're looking for keen engineers with a passion for learning. I'd be happy to take this problem off your hands...


4

I hesitate to add my own answer here, not only because of the good existing answers, but also because of how very divided people seem to be on this topic. But here I go anyway. Discipline Don't do any more than you already have. By not promoting this engineer, you've already basically bit the hand that's been feeding you hours, loyalty, trust, knowledge, ...


51

This is a huge, horrible mess. Promoting you to make you fail is called constructive termination ... And it's the oldest trick in the book. A company can't get someone to quit, and can't lay them off (for some reason). So they setup the employee to fail. they send him out on an urgent job with a minor piece of safety equipment broken, then fire him for ...


2

We used to say that "Just cause" really means "Just 'cause we felt like it". The simple fact is that businesses have been at this for a long time, and put so many rules in the employee handbooks that you are always violating some policy or other. At any time, all they have to do is compile a list of violations, and then terminate you for cause.


5

To be fired for-cause requires generally the satisfaction of one or many criteria including: Dishonesty (including theft, fraud, deception and breach of trust) Conflicts of interest Inappropriate relationship (with boss, junior employee) Insolence or insubordination (disobeying a boss, acting rude or abrasive) Breach of important rules or policies Theft or ...


33

Can you be promoted and then fired for-cause? The "for-cause" part in the US is mostly irrelevant. Almost all states have "at will" employment so you can leave or be terminated for any or no reason at any time. In the US there are far easier and direct ways to get rid of an unwanted employee than staging a mock promotion. This being said, it's a pretty ...


10

Instead of working him out of the company, put him on a "fast track" or "talent programme" or some such. Give him a schedule of things that he must achieve - some of those will be raw qualifications (eg. sit the company's "new managers" training course), and others will be experiences like "come up with a training presentation and invite people to come" (to ...


4

It is not possible to promote an employee without their acceptance. If the employee accepts the promotion, they are responsible for the (new)tasks they have to do. Then, if they are under-performing or whatever, the company can(should) fire/replace them. If someone is getting promoted, it doesn't just mean better benefits/salary, but also harder problems ...


3

With great (any new) power, comes great (newer) responsibilities. Someone can be very good at doing something (existing responsibilities), but not good at doing something else (the new ones). If the new job requires something new to be done, which the promoted employee cannot seem to manage, eventually the company needs to find a replacement. That is why, ...


8

how can you switch jobs and jump into a management / software architect position You apply for those sorts of positions. And it's correct that often it's best to switch companies. Perhaps invest in yourself, take a management course, two major benefits to this are that you learn whats involved, and you get a fancy certificate. Management is a skill like ...


4

I have read through the answers and comments. I don't see any mention of this engineers ability to deliver work as required nor any mention of an ability to mentor others in his group and pass on his knowledge. Unless I am missing something, this person could be brilliant in becoming conversant with yet another new, novel technology. Yet in most cases what ...


12

Note: this answer assumes the employee only has 4 years of experience (based on the question wording) without much leadership experience yet. Experience and technical chops / productivity aren't the same thing The employee in question sounds a lot like me when I first started out, though I wasn't as much of a technical superstar, nor did I resort to ...


7

I happen to think your three-year waiting period accomplished its purpose in this case. You need someone whose work ethic is sustainable, not someone who deflates at short-term setbacks. You wouldn't have discovered that about this person without the waiting period, until it was too late. If this person had reacted differently by continuing on unabated, I ...


-2

If you want him to leave on his own accord (to avoid the 700k severance), introduce him to self-employed software engineers – with their mentoring he will see he there is a whole new world out there which is better suited to his skills and risk appetite


43

A lot of people have already discussed the employee in question at length, and I don't feel that retreading that ground would provide you with much value at this point. Instead, I would like to focus on everyone else; more importantly, this line in your question: ...I'm receiving recommendations to encourage this millennial to quit. Two major things ...


3

I see this differently. You told him the qualifications to get him to the level he wants. He's found that unacceptable and as such stopped doing his work. What will happen when he gets promoted to what he wants now, but late wants something else? Are you willing to put the company in his hands and when things don't work his way, he decides to not do it? You ...


107

I don't see an overeager engineer, I see a disgruntled one. In this answer, I addressed a similar problem, but one that had gotten worse How can I deal with troublesome Professional Engineer? You have taught your formerly eager engineer that effort doesn't matter. He's put in 700K worth of overtime which he has not taken, and you think the problem lies ...


22

It's interesting that you claim "overeager" because it implies that this person does not currently have the skillset to be successful in their desired role. My answer is based on accepting this implication at face value. Question for you: Do you want this person to become an engineering director? If yes: Excellent, you have a driven and highly motivated ...


48

It looks like your company has its reasons to not promote someone before they've spent a certain amount of time in a previous role, to minimize risk. The company is also not willing to bend those rules for this employee, because it prefers to risk losing a well-performing employee rather than risk having a potentially ill-prepared person take a management ...


50

The way to get rid of him is very simple: give him exactly what he asked for. Find an "engineering director" position which is 100% management (preferably, the most unpleasant aspects of management that exist in your organization) and appoint him to it. His much vaunted technical ability will then be of no use to him whatsoever. And keep his nose firmly ...


145

Referencing an answer I put in another question: Does having two jobs simultaneously count for twice the experience? Your company assumes that you count each day as fully worked. You state that your employee put 15 hours a week of overtime. In four years, that's around 18 months of extra time. That could be counted toward his experience if your company ...


192

Do not discipline him. He'll walk, and the company will have lost a very valuable asset. It seems to me the right answer here is for you to sit down with whoever you need to sit down with to get the rules bent in this case and to make it happen. You've got what sounds like a brilliant engineer, and you're trying to force them out of the company. The real ...


647

he's made a point of cutting OT to nothing, focusing on his personal blog/LinkedIn to show off his knowledge, focusing on generic skills/abilities (at the expense of company-specific skills/technologies) and encouraging other engineers to do the same. So let me sum this up: you told your employee that the time he invests and the skills he brings do not ...


3

You might be right, and many companies have this practice, of not promoting the people which really deserve promotion. Also, of course, the "easiest" way to get a position you want is to find one elsewhere, already available and advertised. If you want to get the promotion at your current job, you need to plan it ahead, and be patient. I present below some ...


2

I feel that I outgrew my current position about 2 years ago, and that I really need to be doing more advanced, higher-level work in order to continue my professional development. Given that you want to do exclusively high level work, but your team isn't big enough to warrant that sort of role, you're not likely to win that battle. And I would argue the ...


0

Patience is the way to go. A senior position is not only recognized by technical knowledge or speed in problem solving or the quality in it. A senior position is also recognized by maturity. Maturity enough to handle a "no" and patience to trail the path to your goals without forcing shortcuts. The company gave you a clear path to your goal. Go for it. And ...


0

It is very uncommon for a person to be given a raise after such a very short time at a company. There are exceptions -- it is the regular review cycle, so you are getting a raise; they realized you were hired at the wrong level and immediately promoted you -- but none seem to apply here. It sounds as though you are currently following your employer's ...


14

Five months ago you applied for a job at your current place. They made you an offer, which, at the time, you presumably felt was a fair amount to be paid, so you accepted that offer and started working there. Now, it seems like you want to be paid more. You claim that you want to "receive some sort of incentive for the work [you] have done and [you] keep ...


6

"I feel like it's going to rain today." doesn't mean it's going to rain today. Everything you've stated is conjecture on your part. My advice would be to lobby for the raise you think you deserve for this new position and if you don't get what you ask for then consider either stepping down from this position or find a job elsewhere. There really are no ...


3

Developer here. Since I've actually talked to executives a fair amount of times, and my step-mom worked for CEOs of an F500 corporation, and I've visited their offices, I think I can help. I would love recommendations (literature welcome!) on business etiquette, attire, small talk, how to handle a potential conversation about a promotion, how to present ...


2

The more you learn about how senior leaders think, the more you learn the concepts and language that connect most effectively with them. This will need to be a bit of a crash course, since you only have a week, but you can learn a bit. Find some of the stuff out there on the 'Net on management (Manager Tools is my favorite; you could also read some articles ...


3

The other answer is great, but my comments were too long for a comment. The first thing to understand is that an EVP / SVP has the same goals any 2nd or 3rd line and above manager has -- the effective and profitable operation of the business. The higher up the ladder the more abstract the objectives become, but the goal is generally the same -- the ...


13

How does one prepare for this? Perhaps the most important thing is to keep calm and be yourself and don't pretend/boast. I also suggest you ask your boss if there is anything you should prepare or do before the trip and meeting. Regarding attire, you should most definitely suit up, specially when going to important meetings like this. Now, I must say a ...


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