New answers tagged

1

As far as your opening question - "am i still hireable", you're always hireable. (You can always get another management job you know, I'm told that those positions still exist even after downturns). But as long as you have a reason why you're applying for a technical role once you have had management experience (ie I love technical roles), then you're fine. ...


0

10 years of engineering sounds quite low to me personally to be considered for management, so maybe you have that on your side, at a future date you could say you were not done getting your hands dirty doing the real work. At 32 years now of technical work, I'm done for sure and nobody replies to my resume anymore despite me doing the best work of my career,...


1

My old department lead found a job as developer just fine after getting laid off. This may depend upon connections, how much development you did before becoming a manager, etc... Also, I think this may depend on country. I know that in Germany, older people said there is no way back from management. But I think it's not as true as it used to be. But that may ...


2

No you can't, but it actually a good thing. The previous answers are great. I'll add to it that a potential employer would probably be more impressed that you assumed the level of responsibility and the leadership role that you did without having that title. That shows a willingness to step-up, and who doesn't want to hire someone like that? Your lack of ...


2

can I put the senior title on my CV? No. I know it is nice to have a "senior" badge in your resume, but it is not about this. You are "selling" to a potentional employer not your title but: Experience Knowledge Projects done Professionalism etc. Consider this: Senior developer in noName startup doing Wordpress has fewer market value as junior developer ...


11

The question is, can I put the senior title on my CV? In this case, NO. Do not "invent" new title / designation, go by what you can prove (contract / references). How do I explain to a future employer that I deserve a seniors salary? This will entirely depend on the factor that how much value you bring in and going to add to the organization. Do not ...


1

In 2017, I decided to join this company in which things were weird: I was chosen to work on strange topics I was not familiar with. Then more strange topics were piled on me. That, in and of itself, is not unusual in some roles - there can be lots of different topics & areas that you may need to do client work for, and sometimes the job just calls for ...


1

The key point missing here is your vision of what it means to be in a leadership position is short-sighted. That's okay, many people who aren't in leadership positions don't inherently understand them. And, while you're receiving criticism for your intentions, it does seem like you have a reasonable goal: You want to be the boss of a high performing team. ...


4

I'd like to add something. You say: I feel I have superior social skills to Alessandro, and can work much better with people in a "team lead" capacity: is there any way to convey this to Ted? And then you also say: I'm wondering if this could be brought up with an external agency, such as the #MeToo movement, but am worried that it could become ...


4

Firstly, "strong candidate" is hardly a promise. It just means that you should apply. I have had various people doing the hiring tell me that I am a strong candidate for a position and then did not even get an interview. I also suspect that your boss doesn't have the authority to make such a promise unless he is one of the chief engineers or other executives....


10

You weren't exactly promised. Get that thought out of your head. Because it sounds entitled, and entitlement will not win you the race. Instead, treat it as a typical race for a contested promotion: You told us what Alessandro does better. What do you do better? Social skills is vague. Put this into concret examples that you can show Ted. Preferably ...


3

There's nothing you can do. The company doesn't owe you a promotion, what you promised was not in the contract, and it was not even by the current manager. The company should always promote the best candidate for the job, it sounds like "Alessandro" is a better candidate for a senior engineering position while you're more suitable for non-technical jobs. ...


6

Some observations: A scrum master is not a manager, except in top-down driven fake scrum. A scrum master is more of a coach to help the various participants stay on track. If this company gets more funding, you will spend a lot of time planning, recruiting, hiring, and putting together a team. That's what early hires do at startups, regardless of job title....


4

Right now I’m just worried I'd potentially end up being a bad manager and slow down the project delivery. It’s a concern that I brought up with the founder, and he seems to downplay it, saying that I’m just underestimating my skills. There is a chance that you are right and might be a bad manager. You also might get really good at it and find your passion ...


4

If you decline the promotion and someone else gets it then you'll be waiting even longer for a promotion and the pay raise you want. Realistically, you should accept the promotion now assuming you can handle the responsibility. You can lightly ask about the pay raise conditions but don't make it seem like an ultimatum. Switching jobs has become the norm ...


13

Realistically, you should never turn down a merit promotion. While you are correct, you might be eligible for a bigger raise next year, that likely assumes the promotion and salary budget of the company is going to increase significantly. More than likely, the budget the company has to promote people stays relatively the same, and the new range of raises is ...


15

The appraisal system in our company is going to change next year. What if is the new rule is called off for some reason? What if the rules and policies change, after you decline the promotion this time, offering more-or-less the same as now? What if any other associated terms and conditions are changed, so somehow you become non-eligible for the promotion ...


91

If you want to actually take the promotion, discuss the problem with the manager suggesting you for the promotion. I would love to accept right now, but I have calculated that if I accept now, it would actually be a loss to me due to how we are changing to the new system next year. As I am committed to stay in the company long-term, that works out to a ...


8

Therefore, I was thinking about the consequences of declining a potential promotion this year. I do understand that decline the potential promotion this year gives no guarantee that I will get it next year. What is the best way to approach this situation? Think it through now. Be prepared when and if the promotion is offered. Be quick with a ...


0

Well done! Sometime you need to change your handle: Junior Provider is no longer correct. When you take on work with more responsibility, your client company should expect to pay your company more. Then, your company should pay you more. the work is harder. the consequences of mistakes on your part are higher. Those things are worth real money. If your ...


3

This should be between your company and the client. Inform your manager and let the 2 enter a dialogue over it. Your responsibility is not to discuss pay or anything else, just to do the assigned work. If the request was in writing then forward it to whoever handles the client.


2

It's OK But going to HR for a promotion is probably about as useful as going to Facilities and Maintenance for a promotion. HR should only get involved if the company is illegally discriminating against your promotion because you are in a protected class. Otherwise, HR has pretty much zero business telling business units whether to promote a particular ...


2

I'm going to tell you something you might not want to hear: you might not currently deserve the promotion. Here's why I say that: applying elsewhere. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. ... you're a senior dev. Your company ...


2

There is no harm in shopping around I do not see why you would not be diligently applying. Job applications have very little risk, especially if done reasonably. I had a few tries, but other companies will take me at my current level and not at the next one. I would have to "work all over again". I could apply more, too. This may indicate that you are ...


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