New answers tagged

4

How can I tell my manager that I am not ready yet to be nominated, without putting myself down? There's no sense in which you'll "put yourself down", but the manager will just be plain confused. You: "Thanks but no thanks! I'm only 55% on tech stack ABC so far!" Manager: "Huh? ABC might be gone tomorrow. 90% of programmers are ...


6

Very often senior positions are not just about being exceedingly good in doing your task, but also in being able to lead your team and the organization in the direction you want them to go. That you are no five stars expert in a certain stack has nothing to do with those leading ability. You even say that your manager has no coding experience, yet they are ...


1

Should I wait for the position to be advertised and then apply for it? Or should I tell the department management that I'd like to progress? What kind of wording should be used? Should I use the outgoing team lead? I have a good relationship with them. Don't wait. Talk to the hiring manager now. Explain why you are qualified, and why you would be the best ...


-3

With any sort of negotiation with an employer, for better or worse the unchangeable bottom line is that the only leverage one has is that one will leave the company if one doesn't get whatever it is one is asking for. Hence, "Jack, I'd like to move ahead to Jane's position when she leaves Friday. What do you think?" If they say no, politely say ...


6

Should I use the outgoing team lead? I have a good relationship with them. This is the best place to start - have a private chat with them and say that you are thinking of applying for their soon-to-be-former role. Ask them what the job entails and whether they think you would be up to it. If they are leaving on amicable terms with the company and they ...


9

Barring some strange circumstances, your direct manager (and likely their manager as well, your second-level) should always know your career aspirations. It is part of their job to help you succeed. Organizations I've been a part of will set up a series of one-on-one discussions between managers and their direct reports to keep in touch with performance ...


-1

Let's look at this from another perspective: let's say you working on a team, you're working well above what's expected of your current level and have been for a while. However, there isn't a need for another senior member of this team. Also maybe you're a bit of a quieter type, not so prepared to blow your own trumpet. Maybe also your manager isn't so ...


3

Is this promotion process unusual? Maybe. If you're already in the highest (non-managerial) role that currently exists in the department, it would make sense that there could be some major HR hoops to jump through to justify creating a new position so that you can get a promotion. If that's not the case and you're simply moving from, say, junior to senior ...


1

Yes, your promotion process is quite unusual, but hang on. This looks to me a bit of a forced promotion, when people that are responsible for promotion don't think you can make it, so they create something (or act up on some process in the company), to see whether you're fit. Promotion is more about your individual performance, meeting goals and helping a ...


0

Titles are not completely disconnected from reality, but the connection is not all that strong, either. So there are two questions here, what your org chart says and what your business card says. There is no rule that a company can't have two staff software engineers. (By the way, I would have expected senior software engineer instead. YMMV) Getting this ...


5

How do I/we approach senior leadership with a stronger message than "please promote us both"? You express all the reasons why the company needs more than one person in that role, and why you two are the best possible folks to fill two of those slots. To do that, you must ensure that you understand the details of what the company is expecting from ...


0

Like others have suggested, you should take a step back and try to objectively judge your own performance. It's common for less experienced people to not know what they don't know and therefore overestimate their abilities. In terms of asking for a promotion, there isn't such a thing as too early. People don't always get things 100% correct in the hiring ...


2

Ask your manager or team lead what would be required for a promotion. It’s been said that in IT, if you’re not growing, you’re dying. That applies to individuals as well as companies, and it’s certainly reasonable for a new hire to want to know what would be required for a promotion. It’s entirely possible that even if your “hard” technical skills are at the ...


6

How far off are you from the salary you think you deserve? Are you genuinely going to be cool if your boss says no? What are the opportunities for new employment in your area? What is the going rate for a software engineer in your area with similar credentials? All of these factor in to your decision. Do not approach them if you are not willing to make a ...


0

For what it's worth, are you sure the market is THAT bad for principal software engineers right now? I know a lot of companies are struggling, but some have actually come out of the pandemic well. Wayfair is booming and hiring engineers aggressively, as is Amazon and Google/Facebook are always hiring too. My startup is looking for good principal engineers as ...


5

Tell your colleague what you would need to see in order for you to recommend them, which leaves you open to the possibility that they have assets or artifacts you just haven't seen yet. This builds from Benjamin's answer, positively and honestly telling the colleague where they have room to improve, but while communicating that you want to support them as ...


2

Benjamin provided a very good answer that I'd like to expand upon, and provide a bit of a rebuttal to Ian Jacobs' answer. The bottom line is: You should not tell him you think he is un-/underqualified for the Lead position. Telling him such outright is likely to break him and you may end up losing him as an employee. What you should do instead, is, as ...


10

If management asks you for your opinion, give it to them. I second Benjamin's answer in that you should be aware of the framing; don't say that he is unqualified outright, rather say that you are unsure and mention the areas in which you see potential for improvement. Do not say to your colleague that you think they are unqualified. This is for a number of ...


28

Frame it positively: Name areas he should improve to become a Lead. Be as clear and actionable as possible. That way, you support your coworker and tell he what he has to do to reach his word. Some sample phrasing could be: You told us you want to become Lead Dev. I greatly appreciate that you take responsibilty and that you want to improve things. I know ...


157

How can I tell him that based on skills I don't see him as an appropriate candidate for the position in question without ruining our team spirit? You don't. You wish him good luck and that's it. It's not on you to to tell him you don't think he's qualified. Let him go through the interview process and for all you know he may surprise them. If you are ...


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