Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
134

In short, no, you should not remove an account number or refuse pay. You must be doing something right, because if you were really doing a bad job, you would be fired. It is understandable to feel like you aren't doing any good work or you are burned out, but the ultimate decision on how you are performing comes down to the company. If you really need ...


90

They wanted to see how you react under pressure and on your feet. You don't say what the job is but I imagine it's probably something where you're speaking with members of the public and believe me, they will ask you very random questions. I once attended an interview for a well known toy store and everyone there was given a random toy and told to sell it. ...


80

I supervise 12 employees. There's one that I'm having troubles with lately... he doesn't work at ALL. Define his duties, in writing, and make sure they're measurable. Sit down with him and have a talk about your expectations and go over his duties. Make sure you're on the same page (have him sign off on his duties, then give him a copy and put one in his ...


71

It's very hard to answer this, as you're only one side of the equation, and you admittedly question your own judgment on the situation, but as I'm in essentially the same position (USA: I'm in Denver, most of company is in Michigan), here are a few things to consider: Do not underestimate how valuable it is to have someone to send on-site. How many ...


67

There is no reason whatsoever to tell them why you are leaving. Especially if it is because of a very private matter. If they ask "why are you leaving" you can truthfully say "because I feel the new position is much better for me". That's all you need to say. If they want more reasons, you tell them "I told you I feel the new position is much better for me, ...


67

I don't use tactics like that unless I am interviewing for a high visibility, high stress position. When I do, the purpose is to see how you behave under stress. For one candidate, I asked him a series of obscure questions that nobody should be able to answer. He couldn't answer one correctly, but he did say that he would look it up, or ask someone. This ...


62

I think the first thought is - when making a joke, make sure it's funny. As a boss, I really don't want everyone in the office to think "it's fine to waste the first few hours I'm here, so long as a make it up" because that inevitably leads to differences of opinion in what's a "waste" and also people are pretty bad at being conscious of how much time they ...


55

how do you deal with this conflict once it has been decided that this is something that must go ahead, if you feel strongly against the change? My way of dealing with this is considering what my role in the company is. Am I there as a developer? As an analyst? As a team lead? As a project manager? If I'm the developer (which I surmise you are), then you ...


49

Before going to the boss, I'd suggest talking it over with your coworkers first. See if they support or oppose the idea, or have more specific issues. Some people have allergies to cats and dogs. Some people may even have phobias about certain animals (usually I see this with larger dogs, but no reason it couldn't happen with cats). And some people just don'...


48

Ask questions. Everything you see as being a problem to accomplish, ask for clarification on how would that be done. If you ask enough good questions either they will realize that it is actually impossible or you will realize that in the end it is not that impossible after all. Inaction or ignoring is not an acceptable action. Giving bogus dates is not ...


47

Why to do it: Transparency of things like salaries generally lead to more fairness. It also forces employers to base salaries on more objective (and open) justifications for setting salaries, as opposed to who the best negotiator is, nepotism, or other potentially corrosive practices. This can work best in environments where performance is highly objective ...


45

This guy is winning the visibility battle at your company - and as his manager, you're responsible for ensuring everyone knows this. No one outside of immediate coworkers will know what he is doing -- or not doing. You can feel bad or sorry for yourself or all the people who are doing great work and not being recognized, but at the end of the day, as ...


35

How can I politely ask my employer not to give it to me until I feel that I have improved? Chances are good that's illegal. I'm not a lawyer, or even an HR person, but there are state laws governing pay, including how often they're required to pay you. They can't just decide to not pay you. Any decent company would not want their reputation tied to this ...


34

You've expressed your idea clearly and they decided they did not want to accept your decision and this bothers you. Well of course it bothers you. You've made an excellent case for a particular technology to be used and they flat out denied it. Though remember that politics are always at play, and you cannot understand all the underlying reasons behind ...


32

after resigning, should I tell my employer about this psychologist thing? No. That's a waste of your time, and a waste of their time. Employers aren't interested in why you left. The time to discuss this was while you were there, before you decided to leave. Once you have decided to leave, just do so with a minimum of chit-chat about why. Leave on ...


32

I am the single remote member of my team, though I don't have the 8-time-zones-away problem that you do. The main challenge is lack of visibility; you're doing good work but most of the rest of your team, including the manager who decides your fate, can't see it. Here are some things that have worked for me: Take full advantage of whatever communication ...


31

Interesting, I disagreed with all of the other answers. I started to like enderlands until I got to: As a manager this is your responsibility to change You will not come out of a pissing contest with this person well. He has the ear of the MD and any attempt to usurp him will come back to haunt you. The likelihood is in <12 months he will be your ...


29

Unless you have concrete ideas/goals for programming at home, don't do it. You not being motivated to code at home isn't a bad thing (I don't do any home projects, and I'm perfectly happy like that). Unless you have to program at home, leave all of your coding/technology creativity at work. At home, relax, do your own thing. Use your imagination and ...


26

Many companies like to write policies that say discussing salary/wage/benefits to be a fireable offense. The National Labor Relations Board has repeatedly held that discussing salaries, wages and benefits to be an "organizing activity" covered by section 7 of the NLRA and that company policies forbidding such discussions are banned because they violate ...


25

Inaction or giving a date you intend to ignore is pretty much the worst kind of action you can do. You are basically promising what you have no intention of delivering and that will get you fired. And justifiably so. They are making business plans based on what they asked for. What you do is provide them with an estimate of how long it will take to do. Most ...


23

You're delivering, you're not getting negative feedback, therefore don't worry about it. If they're hiring it's either because they're expanding or going to let someone go. Unless you're privy to the knowledge there is nothing you can do about either. So don't stress yourself out over it. To me I would guess they're expanding. You can only get stressed if ...


22

I actually have to disagree with the other posts that say your current situation isn't a problem. I actually think that you are describing very serious issues in your current environment that need to be addressed before they become fatal problems. There are two two serious questions that you need to get answered soon: How do you measure success in your ...


22

The market seems to be valuing you higher than you think you're worth. You should take the money. First, it's odd to reject compensation. You will raise red flags with management. It's just strange behavior. Second, it's not unethical to decline compensation but you will set a terrible precedent. They will remember this and may decide not to offer ...


21

I know it might sound a bit silly letting the layout of a company's office being a major factor in one's decision on whether or not to take a job, but for me right now it is the only real discriminating factor. No, it's not silly. People have different priorities. For some people, it's the type of work that they are doing and the nature of the projects. For ...


21

Why are you asking us instead of she asking the psychiatrist point blank? "Are our conversations considered confidential and covered by the doctor-patient relationship? Will anything we discuss be reported back to my management?" The answer is either an unequivocal "yes" or an unequivocal "no" (*) and she takes it from there. (*) And yes, the psychiatrist ...


20

This is one of those dangerous personality types; dangerous, because they aren't likely to change. When hiring (or being hired yourself), stay away. The reality is people aren't likely to change anything. People learn, but they don't change their personality. If a person is not open to learning by nature, there isn't much you can do. But is the choice ...


19

Give him explicit tasks to do. Assign him a code snippet to write, or bug to fix. When he does not, document it. Do it again. When he does not, document it. Then fire him.


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