Hot answers tagged

378

Well, the solution here is simple. Thank grumpy for his honesty, put him back on regular tasks, and bring in the next guy from the bench. If someone is not interested in a project like this and there are other people available then it is in everyone's interest to put the people on the project that are most interested in it. Giving grumpy a raise is not ...


364

My response to them saying those numbers are wrong would be to say that that's the reason I'm bringing this to their attention - their idea of the salary range and my idea of the salary range for this position are apparently at odds. At the end of the day, you're looking for considerably more than you're getting, and you believe others are able to offer ...


230

Would it look bad on me if I left so soon after getting a raise? Look bad to whom? Your current employer? If so, I would say yes, after giving you a 15% raise, you leaving shortly after will leave a bad taste in their mouths. But if the opportunity is worth it, do you care? Should I ask for them to renege the raise and give my manager a heads up ...


210

Keep in mind if you don't offer at least a 2% raise, you're actually paying him less due to inflation. Are they doing less valuable work now than they were 12 months ago? Plus, a programmer early in their career quickly becomes more valuable, so their worth increases more quickly. Don't think about this in a moral sense (i.e., does this person "deserve" ...


191

If it isn't in writing, it doesn't exist. If you don't see it in the written offer, by all means mention it. It is not impolite, it is being diligent and making sure all the terms agreed upon are met.


191

Therefore, if my new salary is between A and (A+$950), should I request (A-$0.01)? Assuming you are able to request raises, it would seem to make a lot more sense to request (A+$1300). You can use your argument about the net loss due to higher insurance costs to bolster your request.


176

Never let talk of budget considerations stand in the way of getting ahead. Without you they have no team and they're currently not having to pay a manager who I assume was making more than you. The thing about leverage is that it's often temporary: you use it or you lose it. If your responsibilities and tasks will increase, your pay should at the same time,...


150

This is something that should have been prevented, not dealt with after the fact. I'm sorry but if you (as it seems, without any kind of previous warning) suddenly change the direction of the employees personal development, and get surprised when this is not the same direction the developer wants to progress towards, the problem is not with the employee. Is ...


137

This is business, not personal. No one did you any favors. They didn't give you a raise because they liked you. They gave you a raise because they figured that if they didn't you would leave for more money, and it was cheaper to pay you more than replace you. You have been offered a position that you feel is a better fit. If it is more attractive than your ...


123

A 10% raise is nothing to sneeze at, particularly in the current economic climate. It sounds like your employer already recognizes that you do a lot, and they feel they are compensating you for that work by increasing your salary at a rate substantially above simple cost of living raise (typically 3-5% in the US). Having said that, if you want to negotiate ...


104

When a workplace is getting creative with the money it's a sign that unless you see it as a career company it's best to view it as a stepping stone.


93

So, I called the two oldest and most experienced developers I have on my team and presented the project to them. While one of them seemed really interested in it, the other one was a bit... grumpy, to say the least. You made a choice to ask the two most experienced developers to take on the challenge. If the one who declined the task had done so ...


89

You get pay raises based on your past performance, not on your potential future performance. You don't know for sure if your idea will achieve a certain outcome. Good performance is not just having genius breakthrough ideas. An employee that has great ideas but withholds them from others for glory/reward is not valuable to a company. What is valuable is ...


89

Being blunt here: If you'd come to me and say "Hey, I have a great idea that can save us tons of money, but I need to see some cash before I will talk about it", I'd fire you on the spot. This feels like blackmail to me and I won't have it regardless of how much money is at stake. However if you show with a detailed record of your achievements: "Hey boss, ...


84

First, talk to your wife. Whatever you do, if you do anything, you need to be able to act on anything you say. For example, if you ask for more money and you are indeed granted a raise, you have to follow through. Having your wife object after that would be career suicide or major trouble in your private life. Parental leave is your privilege. Distributing ...


78

Let me play the devil's advocate here: Your company have taken up a work they have absolutely no competences in. This work is in a field that is very much different than most of other fields in software development. This ain't your regular "learn new programming language", this is heavyweight math that even most full time mathematicians fear. Your company ...


78

I am fairly certain that HR will hear my salary request and tell me my numbers are totally off-base compared to the company's research. What is a productive way to reply to that? Is there a productive way to reply? Regrettably, probably not. If the company genuinely has research to support their position, your informal conversations with unknown ...


69

Yes, absolutely. If it's not in writing, you'll have a hard time making a case for it if they "go weird" on you. A reputable company never has an issue with putting a promise in writing. A company that has an issue with it is probably not one you want to work for, anyway.


65

Project based budgeting is common. Look at it from their standpoint (regardless of the reasons it's failing). You've asked them to increase an expense on a project that's already hurting. Companies that don't make profits don't give raises. For those that do project-based budgeting, it's not all that different. The bottom line is that there's nothing you ...


65

I'd definitely make a point to keep asking for a raise. Your performance and experience are increasing year of over year (at least they should be). Additionally, the more time you spend at a company the better prepared you are to handle the problems unique to that organization, further increasing your value to that company. However, keep in mind that ...


59

They offered an extension, it's perfectly within your right to make a counter. Just let them know that you've enjoyed working there and that for $X amount you'll be happy to extend the contract. Negotiation is a learned skill. However one of the intrinsic rules is that the side which needs it less will generally win. So, no matter what, you need to be ...


58

Accept the promotion, the increased responsibility, and the lack of raise. Learn the new job (probably will take 6+ months). Once you're good at it you can look for a new job. Note @Kilisi's answer From the comments, @crueltear may have phrased it better: Accept the promotion, and look for job elsewhere (1 then 3)


57

Since you say you don't want more salary yourself I'll start by addressing the question at the end of your post. Can I mention anything about the interns pay? Treat your knowledge of your colleague's salary the same way you would treat any other confidential knowledge: don't disclose it and don't discuss that you know it. That information belongs to your ...


56

You claim that you are doing a lot of critical work and your boss is giving you 10% raises which are extraordinarily high raises for most companies. Companies that reward hard work typically do it in three ways: Bonus - lump sum short term reward for effort or performance Raise - Long term reward for effort, performance, promotion, or increase in ...


55

On the one hand, I don't want to give him a raise in his salary, just because 12 months have passed. On the other hand, I don't want to simply say "no", because this might make him feel bad, and he has done really good work. From your employee's point of view I doubt he is viewing this request for a raise as being simply "because 12 months have passed" but ...


53

Would it be okay if I asked for a raise given these circumstances? This would be a bit out of the ordinary. Most companies want their employees to participate in cost savings. How to get what you want? What I would do is ask if your company can do a per diem type arrangement instead of reimbursement. This is when a company gives you a set amount of money ...


52

I do think it is fair to ask for a raise after being assigned to specialist work that requires a specific set of skills that are not common in the workplace. It sounds as if this may be a big data kind of project and those skills are highly in demand and pay much better than the average developer salary. This is also true only if the task will be an ongoing ...


51

Give them a raise. They have become better at their job over those 12 months. Not everyone will have achievements they can list due to the nature of their work, but ultimately, they have become more valuable to your firm by absorbing more information and obtaining new skills, improving existing skills. If you decide not to give them a raise, remember that ...


51

Last time that happened at my company, we have negotiated to officially raise the salary to A - 0.01, but keep track of the intended salary C (being A < C < A + 950), so next raise would be based on C instead of A - 0.01. That way, the affected employee kept the best salary they could, as the company couldn't pay A + 950 or higher, but the employee ...


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