102

shall I mention to the prospective employee that she was actively fired, not simply "being redundant"? You shall mention and answer what they ask you, and in a way you feel comfortable. You say you are not sure on the reasons why she was let go, so you can't honestly answer such questions and would be better if you refrained from speculating on the reason ...


100

First off, I would try to talk my friend out of it with things like They're looking specifically for someone with 10 years, and you've only got 5 They're really interested in someone who has a lot of experience working with clients, and I thought you didn't work with clients at all They are very focused on meeting tight deadlines, and you'd be held ...


72

I have been in that situation, and not only once, it is definitely an ugly decision to make. I decided to be open with my friend, and tell him that I don't feel like recommending him as I would only recommend people that I consider to be above average, and sorry, he isn't in my eyes. It is not necessary to word it that he is generally not above average (even ...


53

I don’t want to be responsible if he gets the job in my company and fails as my manager would probably blame me and would likely jeopardise my position here. If he gets the job, it won't be down to your recommendation. Recommended people still have to go through interviewing and tests etc.. If he makes it through all of these it is likely due to the hiring ...


46

When you don't know the candidate too much, but do wish if he gets in the job, here is what you should do. Understand what his profile really is. Take his profile and tell him, you will check whether there is a suitable position in the company. Tell him clearly you can't promise anything. Talk to HR and or relevant departments and share with them the ...


46

As you clarified in the comment, your company has a public portal for job applications. Mention to your friend: We have this job portal and we're encouraged to inform any potential employee to check for the openings and apply online. This way, the process is smoother and unbiased. I'll send you the link, please let me know if you need any help / ...


43

There's no reason not to ask. If they're telling the truth, they'll tell you, and you have a right to know -- especially if you're not actually looking for a position but some of your recommendation-givers (or co-workers or friends) think you are and you're not. However, "your name has come to me highly recommended by one of my contacts" typically means (...


36

Depending on how close you are to him, your possible responses run from "um, that doesn't sound like what they say in the job description, but if you want me to pass along your resume I can" (with possible discussion about why you think there's a mismatch) to "dude, did you read the job description?". This latter should be reserved for really close friends. ...


32

Think about it: Are you sure that Bob told the company "ams agreed to write a letter of recommendation"? Didn't it occur to you that they might have asked Bob "Anybody who might write a letter of recommendation" and Bob said "ams might write one"? The request is written by the company where Bob applied, not by Bob. You could write, without obviously lying ...


26

If the person who is requesting for recommendation has not collaborated with you , but still requesting for a recommendation. You could say that you do not know him/her well and would not be the best person to recommend him/her. On the other case, if the requester has worked with you and you feel that you cannot give him/her a positive recommendation, you ...


26

You say you want to help her, so help her. Stress the positives, avoid the negatives, and hope that someone will be willing to do the same for you in your hour of need. If you don't feel comfortable saying nice things about her, you shouldn't have agreed to give her a reference. It may help to keep in mind, a glowing reference from you does not ...


24

After reading the question it's not clear to me if the question is about a recomendation letter or a simple CV delivery. If the latter, that's not unusual and a hiring managers should be used to this. You could take the CV and say something like: Hi [hiring manager], here is a friend’s CV for [position]. Please don't take this as an endorsement, it's ...


20

Absolutely yes. And as a hiring manager, I would be very impressed by this. It shows initiative and self-confidence. Most people just list their old bosses or co-workers. This means you really connected with clients and helped meet their needs, and impressed them enough that they remembered you among the armies of drones and clock-watchers they likely had ...


20

Recently she was fired (I don't know any details, but it was quite abrupt). shall I mention to the prospective employee that she was actively fired, not simply "being redundant"? No. You already stated you don't know any of the circumstances or details around the end of her employment. Since you do not know the circumstances, it would not be ...


19

This answer is heavily influenced by the germany tag and German work laws. Its contents might sound nonsensical, or counterintuitive, to anyone living in a more sensible different country. Links in this answer lead to German-speaking websites. TL;DR: Ignore the request, or take it to HR, who will likely tell you to ignore it. In Germany, law requires that ...


16

Write recommendations for others, or at least offer to do so when you ask someone if they'll write one for you. If you can't write a reasonably detailed recommendation for someone, you probably shouldn't bother asking him or her to write one for you. Edit based on expansion of original question: For people with whom you've been out of contact for a while, I ...


16

I fully agree with Chad: You could just ignore the request and not reply at all. That is probably the best option for bobs chances. You do not want to impair his chances. You also don't want to spend a large amount of time writing a letter. So don't. You have not promised anything. You could even state this entire affair is none of your concern. So don'...


14

Whenever somone asks me about it, I just say: "Sorry, i never recommend anyone, It's not personal. I'm not in possition to judge and recommend anyone. Also, you never know what might happen and I dont want to to be held accountable. Thats the rule I follow and apply to everyone no matter who they are. brother, mother, friend, girlfriend etc.". It always ...


14

I recently did the following: I chose specific people with whom I've had recent contact and who, collectively, provide some breadth. (E.g. I'd rather have recommendations from an interaction designer, a senior developer, and a product manager than just three developers.) I also sent a request to someone I'd previously provided a (solicited) recommendation ...


14

I would assume that this is maybe just a set phrase recruiters use to get you interested, if your question is ignored. If it is for real then you have a right to know who recommended you (and passed along your personal data).


14

She is asking you to tell others that you think she'd be a good hire. If you can't do that then you need to decline. Saying yes, then subtly sabotaging her prospects is about as back stabbing as you could possibly get and, imho, incredibly unethical. When declining to be a reference you have several options. You can be brutally honest or simply not state ...


14

You're being exploited by this company. They didn't need or want an intern; they wanted another employee and figured they could save a few bucks by calling it an internship. This happens all the time, and there's really nothing for you to do but get out of there as quickly as possible (especially since there's no financial risk). If you're doing work you ...


14

As you've pointed out in the comments of other answers, your company has a public portal for job applications but word-of-mouth and recommendations go a long ways in the application process. "Word of mouth is very strong, and you don't need to the tests." This complicates things, because a recommendation from you may very well lead to a hiring decision ...


13

Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut. Ernest Hemingway We have all said something over a few beers that we later regret. That probably includes your friend, he probably wont hold you to it. Probably the best approach is just to be honest. Offer to give his resume to HR directly (this does get him a ...


12

Is there a way for me to actually help/endorse him and to prevent any backfire in case it doesn't go well for him ? It depends what you mean by "backfire". If you honestly believe your friend would make a good employee at your company you should go ahead and heartily recommend him. A strong recommendation from a current employee (even a new employee) ...


12

What exactly is a letter of recommendation? A letter endorsing you for the goal to which you are applying. Quite frequently this is for a job opportunity, but it can also be for visas, citizenship applications, appointments to exclusive organizations or controlling boards, or other exclusive opportunities. When asking for, or writing one, it's important ...


12

They won't make a German AZ for me (even not on English), because it would highly contradict their company and country standards. That's pretty obvious I think. They would be unable to do so without hiring a lawyer with knowledge in German labour law and I personally think it would provide no use for you anyway. The German Arbeitszeugnis is - as you ...


12

While historically you would give a recommendation at the end of a relationship, social media (in this case LinkedIn) has changed that. It used to be that the only time that anyone would be looking at recommendations is when you're looking for a job so it stands to reason that it's the only time you would give one. These days it doesn't really matter and it ...


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