46

... does having the word "IT" in a job description raise red-flags for potential recruits? YES While there is nothing wrong with IT or the jobs in that category, putting it in front of a title can really misdirect many potential candidates. IT is its own field and while it does cross common ground with developing software, they're very distinct from one ...


16

Since you are unemployed, take the offer on the table. A hard offer is better than a wishy-washy maybe. You are obviously not a priority to them. You can worry about moving up once you have a job, but right now, having employment is better than a definite possibility of a firm maybe.


15

What else can I do to make the company stop? Mark those mails as SPAM, usually Gmail will then start to recognize such emails and start filtering them. If I am not mistaken, you can even indicate that certain account or sender is SPAMming you, and mark them as such to filter those mails. More info on Gmail spam handling here


15

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In the past, I've forwarded the resume to HR as a candidate without referral. I usually include verbiage something like this: "I'm ...


14

They're just there to find potential earns by placing candidates. Not to chat, or be your friend, or anything else. For information on trends or anything else a search engine would give you much more information.


13

Would an apology email be too much? That's a difficult question to answer since none of us are this person trying to call you. That said, it's somewhat typical for recruiters to have to play a bit of "phone tag" with candidates, especially since recruiters are typically calling candidates during normal working hours, and many candidates are working current ...


12

Gender, nationality, age (actually birth date) and even a photo are all standard content of a traditional Swiss CV [1] and asking for this information is perfectly legal. US anti-discrimination legislation as discussed in some comments is not relevant when applying in other countries. Inform yourself about employment laws and customs of the country you want ...


12

Is the nature of this statement some kind of sales/motivation technique? Yes, it is. "either I'm way off, or you're a really good match for this position." is designed to get a reaction from you along the lines of "Hey I better check out this position or I am going to miss out". Its a sales tactic, as after all recruiters are in the business of ...


12

Yes. Reading such a job req would send a few red flags if I read it. It would give me the impression that either the title was strictly for development for projects within the IT department, or that they included the "IT" because they didn't know any better, or that it was some sort of a hybrid role. It's practically a cliché in IT that the Job req is ...


10

Definitely yes. To me, if a position says IT in the title and the company isn't a software shop - they are confusing IT with development. Amongst the devs I know, the worst nightmare they've experienced professionally has been with positions where the employer confuses the 2. These are positions where as a developer they end up in a general "everything ...


10

As soon as I figure out the conversation's going south, I cut it short by saying that I have to get moving on another (unrelated) task, and then I ask the recruiter to e-mail me the requisition, location, and start date. Often, it's an account manager (with better English skills) who will be handling things after the recruiter, so I ask for the account ...


10

Unless you can prove that you actually suffered substantial damages from this hearsay (which might or might not have originated from the recruiting firm) I don't think you have much of a legal case. The recruiters are acting unprofessional by not respecting your wishes, but since they helped you get your job(s) in the first place it sounds very far-fetched ...


7

In Switzerland the questions aren't exactly illegal (you can't prove they've been asked), but you're allowed to lie in the answer. The specific topics you're allowed to lie about, if asked: Pregnancy (possibly except in occupations that simply don't work during pregnancy, my information is unclear) Religion (except where relevant, e.g. if you apply for a ...


7

The main problem is, these people are not here in the US. Hence their language skills can not get any better just by trying to talk to someone on the phone. Most of them are in India, using a VoIP number provided by the only one or two person(s) who are actually here to collect commissions. Since I am not actively seeking new employment, I can be selective ...


7

Speaking from personal experience as an interviewer, trust me when I say there is no malice or forethought in this question. I normally ask this as an icebreaker, filler before ending the interview, or to gauge the time I have to process your application. If you are uncomfortable divulging this information, then be vague. Say you've been to 2 or 3 ...


7

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In this context (you don't want to refer her) I would not forward her profile to HR at all. Doing that is in fact a form of referral and if you ...


6

In most of the recruiting processes, is this just another piece of the puzzle or usually when you are asked for that it means they are already willing to contract you Typically it means that the company is at least moving to the next step. If you weren't still in the running for the position, most companies wouldn't bother asking. For some companies, ...


6

I expect this may vary with local culture but certainly in the UK it's rare to see "IT" listed explicitly on a software engineer or developer job. While I don't think adding it would put relevant people off applying (I know if I saw it I'd just assume it was as a result of development being part of the IT function as a whole) but I think you are more ...


6

Nate, don't worry about it. In a year, 75% of those recruiters will have moved on to some other job where they actually make a buck. Turnover rate with recruiters is extremely high. The rest don't care that you've lost contact, because they've learned not to take things personally. It's the only way they can survive in the business, so there's no need to ...


6

Print out your job advertisement a few times. Put tear-off strips at the bottom with your contact details. Pin the flyer to lamp-posts surrounding your university of choice. Result: Free resumes.


6

It seems like he may truly be interested in interviewing you for the position. Something on your resume may have intrigued him enough to want a sit-down. On the other hand, he may just be "blowing smoke". I'd be careful so that you don't end up without a job at either company.


5

The question why? in some form is always appropriate and worth asking, especially when somebody asks you to use your social capital in a surprising way. You should ask politely. Maybe you could say something like, "I hadn't considered doing that. I wonder what you think would happen if I did do it? Why do you suggest it?" Surprising suggestions often have ...


5

"I don't want to leave my job yet, as I'm just getting started and I really like it" Simply tell them this. Direct is good - they certainly wouldn't rather spend a bunch of time on screening activities/ interviews, and then have you turn around when there's an offer because you were never interested. Say something like 'Timing isn't right - I want to get ...


5

You aren't necessarily being played. How would the recruiter benefit by deliberately stringing you along? However some recruiters are simply careless and/or incompetent. If you need a job, I wouldn't rely on that recruiter.


5

You need to be very careful. Not having interviewed with the first company: you don't really know if they're a good fit for you. they don't really know if you're a good fit for them. Their hiring manager sounds desperate if he would be willing to "work something out on the fly" rather than give a proper interview which could lead to him hiring you, ...


4

Nobody is forcing you to take their calls. You're in one of three situations; you have a job, or you don't have a job, or you're looking to move. If you have a job, you don't have to answer (or talk) to any recruiter that calls. In the other two cases, YOU should be choosing the recruiters that you work with. Select a local recruiter or two, and build a ...


4

Some companies have automated text-recognition software scanning PDF/Word/text document to look for keywords. It is possible that your application did not include the keywords the company was looking for and did not pass stage 1 (triage).


4

It is not inappropriate. A recruiter can ask for lots of information including you to keep them in the loop about any developments you get in your job search. It is also not inappropriate for you to keep this information to yourself should you choose.


3

The only "side" a recruiter is on is their own and there's nothing wrong with that. Depending on how the fee structure they have with the company offering the role they may be incentivised to get the candidate a higher wage as many operate on a commission basis where they get a percentage cut of the new employee's starting salary. To answer your main ...


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