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27

I refuse to work for any employer that requires me to sign an arbitration agreement as a condition of employment. How can I let the company know that I'm not interested in working for them if they require me to sign an arbitration agreement You simply need to tell them "I refuse to work for any employer that requires me to sign an arbitration ...


21

Please don't be a lousy human being by mentioning rumors like that. If the guy has a medical condition it is up to him to manage it, it shouldn't affect his ability to do the job if he can manage it or otherwise come to some arrangement with management. It is simply NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.


12

The professional behavior is to not share privileged information, as well as rumors. There are enough cases when you heard something that is made up. It is also professional to ignore when people tell you rumors or share information about somebody's physical conditions. I usually say that it is not important, ask not to be involved, and try to remove myself ...


12

This would be the same as any other condition of employment that you want to negotiate on. Make a counter offer and be up front if a condition is legitimately a deal breaker for you. I reviewed the offer and think we are close to an agreement. $X per year is more in line with my experience; I need Y days of vacation per year to maintain what I currently ...


10

A recruiter has no business knowing about your work assignments, or difficulties thereof. They cannot do anything about that. They can help you in getting in touch with open positions - keep that in mind while responding to their question. They ask the question because they want to know whether you are OK in the setup / environment in which you are placed ...


9

Don't cheat. There's a good chance that you'll get caught, and even if you don't get caught, it's bad policy. Trying to build a career on lies will come back to bite you. Even if it doesn't bite you with this position, it will bite you eventually. Better to start as you mean to go on. You note the possibility that others will also be cheating. That's ...


7

Robert A. Heinlein's book "Space Cadet" has some boys being tested for admission to a space academy. One of the tests requires them to put a bottle on the floor, shut their eyes, and try to drop beans into it one at a time by remembering where it is. The hero, Matt, only gets one bean in. Other candidates did much better. He asked what there was to stop ...


6

Now I wonder whether I should mention this to the hiring manager. No. You wouldn't be doing anyone a favor, not the candidate, not your employer and not yourself. Could this be considered foul play? Certainly Would it be considered unethical? Most definitely You are disclosing someones personal medical/disability information to a potential ...


6

Until they make you a formal job offer then keep applying for other jobs I personally would just assume you have not got the current job, if they decide to make an offer then the recruiter will contact you. There is no guarantee that even if they do find another role for you that it will be one that you like.


5

Yes, you should be ok to strike off any visibility of financial information that isn't related to your previous income (if it's legal for your employer to ask). Your new employer only needs to see the amount of salary paid and verify the payer reference. If they need to see anything more than that, then you'd really have to question that request.


5

Can I accept both offers? Why would you? Assuming it's full time jobs, you can only work one. And since you have both offers, everything is on the table, you can decide freely. The decision is not getting easier by waiting, the offers won't magically change, especially not after accepting them. With two offers on the table, there is really only so many ...


4

It is not your place to pass along information about a candidate's personal situation. Please do not do it! Why not? You don't know the guy. Your knowledge of the situation is not certain. What if you have it wrong? It's his business to disclose, or not. Not yours. You (probably) don't have training in the way companies must accommodate workers with ...


4

What is the difference between company direct hiring and through consultancy involvement hiring? Since they are giving you the offer letter, you are directly employed by them rather than employed through a 3rd party consultancy that contracts employment with them. It's likely they have a recruiting relationship with hiring consultancy you've been working ...


3

This should go in the cover letter not the CV Resume: Your skills, work experience, education. Same for all jobs you apply. The resume is specific to you, not the job. Learning intent wouldn't go in here, since it's not a skill you have (yet) Cover Letter: Why is this is job a good fit for you and why are you a good fit for this job. Overlay of the job ...


3

You asked, Should I mention this at my CV? If yes, how? In a comment, you clarified your goal: I would expect it can result in some "bonus points", as it shows I plan to stay longer in the new country and potentially I could be promoted in the future into roles that requires knowledge of local language It's always good to seek bonus points, but there ...


3

It is a recruiter's job to take emails and phone calls from their candidates. So, don't worry about annoying her, not at all. It shows her she has a live one (you). These commercial hiring processes move slowly. Be patient. It sounds like that company was trying to fill a lot of positions. A hiring project like that is probably understaffed and hectic. It'...


3

You seem interested in approaching this question without any concerns of the ethics or possible negative impacts of cheating - only with concern over competing against other candidates. I think you've already received good answers and comments that address ethical concerns or negative impacts, so I am going to address the point you seem stuck on. In a ...


2

They are full-time jobs.I got offers from above two companies if i accept both offers and finally will chose one. It sounds like you want more time to decide, so instead of asking for that you're planning on saying that you'll accept both offers, and then before signing any legal paperwork, rescinding on (let's say) company B's offer later. I personally ...


2

One way I know of to have clauses you cannot agree with removed from a contract is to actually strike them out and to then send your corrected version of the contract draft back to the other party. If the arbitration agreement is a seperate document, you can simply tell the other party: "I'm sorry, but I will not agree to this. Apart from that I'd gladly ...


1

This is common. There's nothing strange or sketchy about it. A consultancy (or recruiting agency) found you and presented you to this employer. The employer decided to hire you and gave you a job offer. Your employer will, very likely, pay a fee to the consultancy when you begin working. But that is between them. You don't need to do anything at all about ...


1

That test is designed to put you under time pressure. They've surely designed it so nobody can answer all the questions. And, they've designed it to measure your "fast" thinking (cf Thinking Fast and Slow by Danny Kahneman). They're surely measuring something other than the absolute number of "correct" answers. If you somehow defeat the time pressure ...


1

I guess what I am asking is, how much can you confide in a recruiter? Confide? No You need to remember / realize that a relationship with a recruiter is primarily a business relationship. By that I mean that your recruiter's loyalty is to their career, their employer, and the client. Not necessarily in that order, but at least one (probably two) of ...


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