New answers tagged

1

The trick is to create challenges that are going to test for what you need to hire for, in the shortest possible time. That is, minimise the amount of coding the candidate actually needs to do. So for example, let's say you need to make sure they can implement a REST API. Instead of making them do multiple end points - just set the task as CRUD on one ...


-1

I do send out a 4 to 8 hour long coding test only as an offline, do it on your own time, week long, test I’ve had people refuse doing it and that’s a good thing. Nothing wrong with them but probably not a good fit, since I think the test is necessary and they don’t, so it won’t be good for either of us that I end up being their manager. But don’t get me ...


-5

8 hours is long, but it is also a good shortlisting method. Only the confident and best programmers will take an 8-hour exam. Programming is all about solving difficult problems, the 8-hour exam is going to be a good start. Push for it. You will get your brilliant candidates from a tough exam. You only need one for the job.


0

If you are not actively looking, ignore it. Unlikely to get anywhere Check whether the recruiter is actually an employee of the company or from an indepdent agency. If it's agency, tell them to go away. They are just harvesting resumes for their database. If it's a company employee, check out the company and see of your are interested and whether it's a ...


1

Most likely there isn't a job - yet. That doesn't mean there won't be in the future. Given this is coming from an internal recruiter at a company rather than an agency, the usual concerns that they are just harvesting CVs for the database of people to hit up with emails/phone calls every time a potential match becomes available is lessened. Most likely ...


-1

An alternative view is that interview technical questions, and any associated testing, should be regarded as testing whether the resume is accurate. Begin your process by asking yourself "If this resume is accurate, would I want to hire this person."? If they do not claim a sufficient subset of skills you want, do not interview them. Rather than trying to ...


-2

Funny, I was always skeptical of this type of assignments. What exactly should candidate code for 8+ hours? If you need to test their skills, IMHO, practical questions is the way to go it is a fundamental way to show that test assignment is not a "free work" Some of the questions could be a 3-4 lines of code for specific task / skill validation Broken ...


8

Eight hours is far too long for a weekend When I was applying for jobs, I had to do a few of these. I was a young, single, no need to work while in school person. And I would have found eight-hour tests to be problematic. Especially since it will probably take 12. I had no obligations back then and still might not have been able to squeeze that in around ...


19

I estimate around eight hours and it is likely an underestimate. That's ridiculous. If you need them to sit for an 8 hour code test then you ought to pay them the hourly equivalent for the position they're testing for. If you're not willing to do that than reduce the length of the test by 75%.


2

Is this ok? How should we introduce this task to candidates? Is there anything we can do to improve the situation if the test truly can not be shortened?l There is no universal measure that makes a test too short or too long, only whether it's worth it. If on the other end of the stick there is a job that pays more than the rest of the market then the ...


0

Depending on your university, the alumni association may be of great help. They could help you get in touch with previous students now employed, who can in turn put you in touch with the right person in their company.


4

How can I find companies that have engineers/departments within my area of expertise to look for internships bypassing all the recruitment spam which hides the company's names thoroughly? Work with your university's placement office. They usually have lists of companies offering internships.


1

Here are some ideas, you need to judge if they work in your case. do a keywords-based search for companies in your area; example: internship, job, IoT, embedded engineering, ... use "generic" job sites, which present the company names too; save the list, you might need it later; discuss with your professors at the university, ask for company recommendations;...


3

A recruiter was very direct in asking me for the Last four of my SSN for a job at JPMC. You were right not to provide the last four digits of your SSN. I am 100% sure that this is a scam. https://careers.jpmorgan.com/us/en/recruitment-scams-warning The lead recruiter then contacts me, does an "equation" for the salary and then states his best ...


1

Usually, you will have to provide your SSN and DOB when joining a company. The only circumstances where you should provide this information is after you have accepted an offer. Also, this is not information that you should be sending through email or a text message as neither are secure forms of communication. Tell the recruiter that you will give them ...


10

It is entirely possible that the hiring managers got confused between Java and JavaScript and didn't consult anyone technical that would have corrected this. Managers are generally not technical people; They are paid to manage people, and that level of technical know-how is often considered a bonus-but-not-necessary skill for those managing technical teams. ...


2

I strongly feel I would have been able to get everything to work if I had more time. I can tell you that the majority of candidate feel this way and communicating that to the recruiter is not necessary. Should I email the recruiter asking if I can retake it? Generally there isn't a "retake" option with automatic assessments. Companies will typically ...


-1

This is a normal thing for large companies to do such assessment tests. And yes you need to have prior practice in order to complete these assessments on time. I have gone through a few tests and it gets difficult to complete the test on time when you get stuck at some point. There are some websites those allow you to actually practice such questions and I ...


4

Checking if the candidate is able to solve a given task within an ambitious time limit is the very point of these tests. Most candidates would do great "if the time didn't run out". No, you shouldn't ask to retake the test, it would sound very naive. And yes, they are popular in several industries. Just move on. Sometimes you win, sometimes you fail. That'...


7

Should I email the recruiter asking if I can retake it? No. They've already moved on to another candidate. When doing an assessment is it a good idea to ask how they score it? The recruiter won't know the answer. They just have a checklist of things that a candidate has to do, and if one of them is 'Pass the assessment with a score of 70 or above', ...


1

Is this normal for getting hired in the tech industry? No, just development mostly. Most of the tech industry is based on qualifications and experience. But due to the nature of development, people with similar papers can differ widely, hence the tests. How can I use this information to target my job search? Just keep trying, but 4 hours for a job you ...


1

I am an American and therefore cannot speak for Switzerland, but I do know that here it is very ordinary for a contractor to be an employee of the company who is managing the contract. (In fact, I think that you should insist upon being an employee of that company.)


2

so if I can't remember the exact name of a function in a programming language or the order it takes its arguments, I can't look it up and couldn't complete the test? Whenever you don't know what is expected of you, it only makes sense to ask the one who has the answer. While it seems obvious to me (and I could be wrong), I'm not the one interviewing. ...


10

or use any other resource It's a pretty clear cut no.


-1

Usually, when a recruiter (or anyone else) says they want an updated resume, they mean a resume that's appropriate for applying for the position in question. In other words, they don't want a resume that's been on your hard drive collecting dust for two years. It needs to have all the trainings you've completed, all your experience, all the way up to the ...


1

One potential problem is that your target audience may not consider themselves to be in Excel hell. Some of your potential customers are people who are totally happy with using Excel all the time, and who could benefit from custom software, but are totally unaware of that. They're going to read the phrase "Excel hell" and think, "Well, we're not in Excel ...


0

Call him and be honest and understanding. You are selling yourself. Don't be pushy, but make sure you are still in the race. You can usually sense on the phone if the recruiter is trying to "get rid of you" or if it just honestly takes longer than usual. There is nothing wrong in showing them your interest in the job.


3

Depends on your situation. Do you want to risk pis.... upsetting somebody in HR or tech department that is screening LI profiles and has no technical skills/sense of humor? If you want to take a risk what you might gain is that potential employers that might hire you are more likely to be a company where you want to work since they did not disqualify you ...


10

I disagree somewhat with some of the other answers; I find that, particularly in tech-adjacent fields, casual language is somewhat common in LinkedIn profiles and doesn't necessarily seem to be holding anyone back. It is a much less formal format than a true CV, which doesn't typically, as far as I know, even have something like a tagline the way LinkedIn ...


16

YES! If you're trying to tailor your profile... Evorlor hit the nail on the head. This kind of language is an effective culture filter. A number of the other answers claim that this is a bad idea because it will alienate % of folks who view your profile. If you're using your LinkedIn profile to attract any and all-comers, then keeping your language bland ...


26

Probably not, but... ...you are onto something with this general idea. Whilst I agree with the other answers and think this particular example goes a bit too far, I'll offer the devil's advocate perspective: looking at this through a marketing lens, where you are the product, using quirky taglines to differentiate yourself from the crowd whilst 'losing' a ...


2

Would it be too much to call the guy tomorrow You have nothing to lose by calling except a few minutes time.


75

There's a time and place for humor - and realistically ninety nine times out of a hundred your LinkedIn profile isn't it. I'm guessing you wouldn't use this line on your CV so that begs the question of why would you use it on your LinkedIn? Because exactly like your CV, LinkedIn is somewhere you're generally putting your "professional" facade on, and just ...


5

No this is inappropriate. Though I understand what you want to say, as I read your profile with an internal chuckle, 95% will read it and feel/think any number of things. They‘ll find it any of the following or a combination of unprofessional, maybe childish, not funny, offended, or any number of random things I can‘t think of right now, most of them not ...


9

This is the way that I, a non-Swiss s/w developer, have always worked in Switzerland. If you are not on the payroll of the agency, they will recommend an umbrella company, but it is extremely unlikely that you can be self-employed in Switzerland, and less so that the end-client would accept it. Companies like to deal with companies, rather then ...


68

"Escaping Excel hell, one spreadsheet at a time." This is a bad idea The profanity aside which might bother some people, that phrase makes it seem that you want to get out of Excel work, not that you are an expert in it. If I saw that, I wouldn't think that you were a developer translating Excel work but rather that you were a disgruntled analyst seeking a ...


4

UK here. I can't speak for any other country but this is exactly how it worked in the contract roles I've been involved with. I can think of a few logistical reasons for this, namely that it makes things easier for the contractor company to switch your roles or for the client company to let a bad contractor go and put in another from the same company. ...


9

Depending on which kind of work you do, and where you do It, this might or might not be true. For example, if you are doing construction work, this might be regulated in Switzerland to an extent that it won't be feasible for you to fulfill all the necessary prerequisites. I, for example, do IT-consulting from Germany, and I have Swiss customers. I don't ...


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