New answers tagged

0

I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it. The potential employer even acknowledged it. The commonly accepted practice is that merely having an offer does not stop you from interviewing with others, but this is the dividing line: after you have accepted the offer and the potential employer acknowledged it, ...


1

There's a lot of subtlety in this subject, and some of it will vary with cultural or job-specific differences. That said, in general, the best rule of thumb is to actively pursue all options until you've made a firm contractual commitment to a new employer. On the one hand, until you've made a firm commitment, you never know what could happen - a "likely" ...


2

Yes. Doesn't hurt to at least talk. You owe nothing to either employer. Years ago I had interviewed at a job, and was told by a manager there that they liked me, but couldn't hire me until the owner returned from out of town. Since I did not have a firm offer in hand, I started work at another job. After a week, I got the offer, and he actually ...


4

Completely explore all the available options before committing to one, and choose the one that best aligns with your career goals. The recruiter did come back and acknowledge that I received an offer from another firm and knew that I mostly might be taking it, but was encouraging me to "STILL INTERVIEW" and meet the management about potential roles. It's ...


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Having been in the recruiting industry myself, i think it is fair to tell a recruiter that you will only consider roles that pay higher than your current one. However if that is the only thing that motivates you to make a change, in a hot market it can make you appear like a risky person to work with. Recruiting a candidate, coordinating interviews, ...


116

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


2

I had 2 interviews scheduled with Company B and C for next week, which I both cancelled by informing them I have accepted another offer in the meantime. It was good of you to be courteous by informing in advance. This potentially saved some work/time for the recruiter and interviewer. what do I do with companies D, E and F, which I have applied to, but ...


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The other answers have it covered pretty well: no need unless you reach the interview stage. I just want to add that if anything goes wrong with your accepted job and you need to get back on the job market quickly then the applications currently in a pre-interview stage could be a lifesaver. It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with your selected job ...


4

No. If they respond to wanting an interview, then let them know you have accepted another offer.


56

No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


3

more technical phone call with a software engineer to dig deeper into my experience on CV - this will be technically oriented So my question is - how should I prepare for the technical phone call with an engineer? Since they will be digging into your experience as represented on your CV read your CV over very carefully make sure you know of ...


8

Frame challenge: I wouldn't respond to unsolicited recruiters at all. It just gives them hope that your contact info will some day bear fruit. When you're open to new job opportunities, you locate a recruiter that is relatively respected in your industry (or has contacts with a company that interests you) and you reach out to them. At that point, as the ...


7

It's not rude at all to express certain requirements that are an important factor for you to consider leaving your current position which you are happy with. It's definitly in your interest to provide such information when contacted by a recruiter. Being in a similar position (I'm quite content about my current role and my paycheck), I was also contacted ...


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Why would it be rude? Is it rude to tell the salesman what color car you want? Is it rude to tell the chef how you want your steak cooked? Is it rude to tell the dry cleaner that you want your shirts starched? It's not rude to tell people what you want. Be courteous and professional, and tell them what you want.


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No, it's not rude. If that's what the situation is with you, be polite but clear. Thanks for reaching out At this stage I would only be looking at offers at a total compensation of over $X (before tax). Are you able to detail the compensation range for this role? Many regards, BI You are saving both of you some time.


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I understand that you do not wish to disclose your reasons to us, please don't take this answer as insistence on that. If your condition is not absolutely unique (and with over 7 billion people on Earth it most likely isn't), then talking to other people with that limitation and how they dealt with it could be a good idea. Phone calls for interviews are ...


-7

When they email to arrange a call ask for their physical address as a scam check. Turn up in person at 9am saying you "were in the area".


7

It might help to phrase things as follows: I regret that I am not reachable by telephone, however I would be happy to travel to answer any questions you may have in person. First, you present the issue with phone calls as part of your situation. If you say that you are "unavailable" for a phone interview, many people will think "well, make yourself ...


0

Just offer to buy coffee / tea / lunch to discuss it. You don't even need to mention phone limitations. Who would turn down a free meal? Plus it shows that you are assertive and seriously interested. Or even just drop by their office (if they have one) on your own time. Remember, recruiters make money off of placing jobs. They will work with you if ...


1

"Are you available for me to call you?" How do I communicate that I cannot undertake that part of their preferred process, and I would gladly enter into an alternative? Just offer the alternative. And acknowledge that you are asking for a deviation. I'm sorry for the inconvenience, but as I mentioned, I'm not available for phone calls (nor ...


1

The recruiter would have nothing to gain by telling your current employer that you're looking for a new job. There isn't some vast, shadowy conspiracy to make life difficult for you by ratting you out to your current employer. The recruiter doesn't care. If anything, he sees you as a potential ally in his/her being able to place you with one of his clients.


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Any recruiter who is any good will not say you are leaving to your current company - this is just not a good business strategy for them. If they did that would you continue with them? However, it is possible that sometimes things "get back" to your manager through other routes...


7

What's a nice, diplomatic way to end this without burning bridges or making myself look bad? A simple statement, something like the one below, should do the trick: Thank you Mr. XYZ for the job opportunity you presented to me. However, because of some changes in my life, I am temporarily not looking for a new job any more. Maybe we shall have the ...


83

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


62

I think that being unable to take a phone call is going to be so unusual to a recruiter (or a prospective employer) that unless you can give a good reason they'll just perceive you as "awkward" and pass over your application. The best reason is usually the truth, e.g. My location has no cell/data coverage and I only have limited web access. I can call ...


145

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


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Please note that eliminating the possibility of a phone call will cause some recruiters to refuse to work with you and will cause all sorts of problems with others that would make them less helpful for you. That being said, if you want to communicate your no phone policy then you need to do so in your initial communication and do so definitively. Say ...


3

Are you available for me to call you? Simply answer it politely. You don't need to give any specific justifications, just need to put your request clearly. Sorry, I won't be able to take any phone calls. Please communicate over email and I'll make sure to respond promptly. I prefer email over phone as it makes the communication un-rushed/convenient and ...


0

You have two issues to consider. One: The best way to get an interview. Ask the recruiter for advice and help. If you make direct contact with a hiring manager, ask that person for help too. "I really want to work here; please help me make that happen" is a good way to pursue it. Two: Conflicts between recruiter and hiring company This really isn't your ...


1

Why not pursue both? So long as you're transparent when talking to recruiters about having multiple applications in the system, there's nothing to lose by submitting an online application and one through the recruiter. A duplicate application can easily be removed later in the process. A direct application ensures the company sees your profile and it's not ...


0

The company may well have hired the recruiter because they were getting no response. Does the company web page say how long the role has been online? The opposite might be true. The company may have decided to advertise on its own to either save the recruiter’s finder fee and any ongoing commissions — which are usually quite high — or because they have have ...


3

It sounds like they are trying to hire into expertise that they fundamentally do not have for themselves. They've been rapidly expanding, and they've realized that they need someone in a role as "experienced blah" for your particular blah, but that very need means that they're not sure what that entails. They don't know what they need you to do because ...


2

My Interview concerns are: Does the disjointed interview process give cause for concern or is that more typical in smaller organizations? Does the consistent changein description of the role give cause for concern? Also, they broughtup money (how much I want to make) three times in total (once on the phone and twice in person). ...


1

Does the disjointed interview process give cause for concern or is that more typical in smaller organizations? Let’s call it pink flag. It may have a little downside but is hardly a showstopper on its own. Poor interviewing is not necessarily a trait inherent to startups. I’ve seen the other side where established companies were so formulaic in their ...


1

I have been approached by a company to interview for a position very similar to what I am currently doing (albeit wider in scope) You appear to have been approached based on your current skills/accomplishments based on publicly available data about you, and apparent eagerness of the organization to have someone with similar skillsets. From your description ...


7

There are pros and cons to going direct. While you can cut out the middle man and can negotiate for yourself, the company might not know you; you're another random person asking for a job The company might have a professional relationship with the recruiter, who is actively seeking people who are suitable for the role - essentially the company is using the ...


4

I'm by no means an expert as I've never personally used a recruiter, but based on colleagues and friends experiences they've shared with me about recruiters is summarised perfectly in this answer from this question. Recruiters often have a good perspective of the industry so they can help fix up your CV, prioritize skills or otherwise make yourself more ...


-1

Recruiters get a fee for introducing candidates to the company. If a company receives an application for the same person from different companies, this means if the job is offered to this person a dispute would arise. This may not matter to you but reality is that a lot of employers will simple throw away your CV if this happens as they don't want to go ...


-2

Let them do their job How do I respond if 2 or more recommend me the same position? Do I just tell the second person that I am already in contact with them? No need to tell either one of the recruiter anything. The onus isn't on you to inform either one of the recruiters that you are already talking with someone about the same job. You may be having very ...


7

Yes, you don't want overlapping applications as it can cause confusion but also look like you're applying for places for the sake of it and not actually knowing what you've previously applied for. If you do happen to have two applications for the same place it's not the end of the world, you still have a chance to get through but it's just best that you try ...


6

Last year I was also approached by an Amazon recruiter on LinkedIn and invited to the hiring process for a software engineer position in Ireland. I went up to the last stage of the hiring process but didn't get the job. But after doing it, I must say that I found it far less technical than one would expect from an Amazon hiring process. They gave much more ...


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The first five items on the linked page are critical. It's unlikely any of the FAANG companies will hire you if you cannot demonstrate an understanding of CS fundamentals and an ability to code at a whiteboard. Get a copy of 'Cracking the Coding Interview' or a textbook like 'Fundamentals of Algorithms' or preferably both and get to work. Be sure to ...


9

Ignoring the interviewer is definitely not an option, if you want to make a good impression. That leaves you with 2 options: Accept the interview, and try to study as best as you can Reply to him, explaining that you really appreciate the offer, but can't right now for personal reasons. Ask him if you two can keep in touch, so you can contact him once you ...


-1

The missing piece of this question is your actual experience in an actual leadership role, and how comparable that experience is to what you want. I'm going to answer both ways - you have and haven't been a leader. If you've never been in a leadership role before, it's important to understand that "leadership" isn't the next step after "really good at what ...


0

This would be my answer: I'm sorry. I can't fill out this second application. I've been interviewed for the wrong position before. It wasn't a good feeling. I understand if this hurts my chances of being considered for the leadership position. Whatever you decide. I wish you well. I'm not expecting many people to agree with this ...


5

Normally, you would not be formally "baited and switched", but a few word-of-mouth catches are not so rare AFAIK. Either way, you can refuse whatever proposal you receive that you dislike and I wouldn't think it's a waste of time to go through the process even if you are not interested in the job. I would strongly suggest to give the same desired salary in ...


1

I wonder if this seems like a bait and switch where they will try to rail road me into regular developer position. They can't "railroad" you into anything. If they don't offer you an interview for the position you desire than don't interview with them. You're in control of which types of positions you interview for. If it seems like a bait-and-switch then ...


2

Assuming your professor has account on Linkedin, I would suggest to ask your professor to leave a public recommendation to your profile on the Linkedin. If you don't have one, you should definitely create one. In such case potential recruiters wouldn't need to contact your professor since they would directly see his/her public reference.


0

Yes, you should advise your manager. The consulting agreement may include a provision that prevents the consultant from attempting to recruit members of your organization while working together. The behavior of the consultant may be a violation of the agreement, which your manager should be aware of. However, whether or not the consultant did something ...


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