New answers tagged

7

Every single master's degree is obscure Except to the people who work in the field daily and see a lot of resumés. Like recruiters. Your master's is supposed to be a specialization in a very small field. Your graduating class will be tiny compared to your bachelors. But you will be either applying to jobs which ask for your specific degree or a recruiter ...


7

If you just put: MSc, Mechatronics (University) on your CV under qualifications, then your concerns may pan out, at least partially. Some recruiters will skip because it does not match known degrees. There may also be an opposite effect of being attractive because you stand out from the crowd. However, that secondary effect requires more thought from CV ...


2

I can't speak for Japan, because the culture is very different there, but speaking in Canada, here's my perspective on working with recruiters: Recruiters are always on your side. Well, put more properly, yours and their goals align. They don't get paid unless someone gets hired. Your goal is to get hired. If they put you into an interview and you get ...


2

I'll "third" the recommendation that you contact a lawyer. You have two choices. The first is to take the information to your current employer, explain how much you enjoy working there, and how you believe you are a valuable asset. Then you ask for more money. It sounds like you have a valid offer in hand, but don't want to leave. This is the "I have done ...


1

I second the "talk to a lawyer" advice, and to not blindly trust a recruiter. Little anecdote : I had a non-compete clause in my contract (I'm from Belgium, so the laws might not be the same in the UK). In Belgium, a non-compete clause has to pass certain requirements to be legal : a minimum salary, some industries aren't eligible,... And even if the ...


14

Talk to a lawyer Your recruiter isn't paid to know the law, they are paid to sign you up to companies. I've personally seen some very shady behaviour from some recruiters in the past, and without knowing this one, I wouldn't rule out that they may be lying to you. With that said, in some jurisdictions, it is true that non-compete clauses are either ...


4

The recruiter will act in their best interest. And it’s absolutely not in their best interest to tell your boss. I can go to a recruiter and say “I don’t want to stay in my job forever. I’m not in a rush, but give me a call if anything turns up.” Good news for the recruiter: He will eventually find a new job for me and cash in. Telling my manager isn’t ...


2

If I'm reading the situation right, you are a (new) team lead who wants to hire some specialized roles, who is working around budgetary requirements, expecting the process to take 2-3 months. Here is what I would suggest: Build a pipeline of candidates: If you want to hire N candidates over a period of Y months, you will need to get the ball rolling with ...


2

He demonstrated professionalism and "care" by actually following up, and every now and then, "investigating" if I am happy or would like to move on to something else. It is been a while I did not hear from him though while still employed. His sole motivation is to place candidates in positions so that he can get paid. That means that a recruiter will "...


18

I would want to use him in my new search, but this will guarantee that my current manager know about my plan This is not going to happen, because: Before the switch: It is not in the recruiter's interest to inform your manager, as a recruiter earns commission when you get the job via them. But them telling your manager is a relationship spoiler for the ...


4

Your wanting a new job is indisputably a good thing from the recruiters standpoint, It means he or she will get paid again. Unless you're dealing with an in house recruiter or a real sleazeball, there's zero reason for one to burn bridges by tipping off your current employer.


8

The other two answers suggest that either this is irrelevant, or that making the disclosure might imply that being close friends is somehow a bad thing. It's both relevant, and a fairly normal potential conflict of interest which should be disclosed. Any time there is a possibility that a relationship will unfairly or inappropriately affect an outcome, a ...


5

Before the process should I disclose this to anyone in the company or at college? Or should I do it during the interview so as to not cause any partiality in the selection process? Tell them it if they ask you. Otherwise I don't see the need to "disclose" such information. Framing it like that seems like you two being friends were a bad thing (which is not)...


8

This is really up to your friend and his/her ability to be impartial in the process. Have you talked to your friend on if the other interviewers know of your relationship? It's up to your friend to recuse themselves from at least your interview if they feel it is necessary. Or should I do it during the interview so as to not cause any partiality in ...


1

That company could be interviewing a number of people, they haven't decided yet, and they want to keep you available in case they decide that you're it. From your side, never assume that the decision has been made until after you have a written offer in your hands (email is acceptable). Until then, keep looking for other jobs, keep interviewing, behave as ...


7

Is there anything I can do to push for a contract? In that case, any suggestions? Perhaps I am overreacting and should be patient? Or has the company lost interest, decided to move on, and left me wondering? I suggest that (as mentioned in comments by Joe) try giving them a call this time, so you don't have to wait the email 'lag'. The time frame they gave ...


1

It all depends on 1) the culture, 2) your skills (how marketable they are) and 3) the industry. First of all, let's clarify one thing. It might be a question of wording, but with a master degree plus 1.5-year experience you shouldn't be applying for entry positions. An entry position is something for total beginners, who can't contribute much. If you worked ...


0

Why not ask for a salary package review after 6 months and show them how good you are in that time... That way you, and they, have real evidence of your capabilities. This has the advantage that it is direct evidence that they have so they know all the parameters...


5

I've been in your position before. Even though it all depends on the company itself, I'll try to answer from my experience. I've been taught that it's all about taking risks. i.e. do you really need this job? In my case, I've persuaded myself to not take the original salary if they refuse. Hence, I took a strong stance on the salary range that I want to ...


-2

There are two possibilities here. First, the recruiter got your information in a normal and above-board way. (Maybe recruiter A, leaving company B, gave it to a replacement C, who took it to company D when changing jobs, and later shared it with recruiter E who you don't know and who works at a company you've never heard of. Maybe this recruiter recently ...


4

You are not wrong to be concerned; and I agree with DarkCygnus that the simplest solution is to quickly decline the offers and move on. On the other hand I think it's important and valid to try and keep control of your personal data. If you are in the EU, you should be able to request all the data they have about you under GDPR; this would include how they ...


15

Now my question is, is it wrong to ask about the source of data where the recruiter found my personal Info? No, there is nothing wrong in asking that. Some people may take it nicely and others not. Seems this recruiter was the latter. What if its case of stolen data, should it be reported to concerned authorities? I think saying it's "stolen" is going ...


8

Do not trust this recruiter. They do not have your best interest in mind. Ghost them. As a recruiter myself that should have never taken place. They are invested in their own self interest at this point.


0

Other answers have covered why the job description should be available. But your "job description" includes something else too, which is the name of the company. You will not get the company name from a recruiter until you've agreed that they put you in contact with the company. When you agree to be put in contact with the company, you've started their ...


0

I do not work to persuade a recruiter: they're applying to me to be my agent. They need to fulfill my job requirements for that role. I have one good one and two sufficient ones whom I contact when needed, but I'm always interested in getting another good one. There are enough avenues to apply for jobs, that I don't need to coddle any one petitioner to ...


0

It's a frustration I recognize all too well. I have tried putting in my profile: "Only concrete information and/or offers please". I have tried responding with: "Could you send me more concrete information about the offer?". I have tried going along with them. It just doesn't work. I have found out after years of recruiter harassment and spam that getting a ...


4

I know this will likely hurt my chances and I am willing to live with that. I would like to enforce a personal policy: I will not engage a recruiter if I do not see the job description (JD). I honestly do not understand this. This is exactly how one should work with recruiters. I mean, you cannot apply for a job (nor have your resume sent without your ...


1

The note you got from the recruiter doesn't seem unusual. Offer a brief reply that both acknowledges the question and the update. Perhaps something like: Thank you for the update. I very much enjoyed connecting with X, Y, and Z during the interviews and am excited about the position. I'll look for your update next week and be sure to reach out to you if ...


7

Are they trying to probe for my interest in the position or are they just starting a conversation? This is simply an attempt on the recruiters part to see if you caught any red flags from the folks you interviewed with or about the company itself. how should I reply to them to increase my chance of getting the offer? I might say something along the ...


1

I'm honestly shocked that recruiters are recommending you a job without one. How on earth do they expect you to make a decision without the relevant information. My advice is to simply make your requirement clear. Something like: Dear Rec Ruiter, I'd like some more information before engaging this company. Could you send through a job description ...


3

In General You are the product. The recruiter is the salesperson. They get a commission when they connect you to a job. They need to provide enough information to get you interested in a position. Whatever you need for that to happen is what you need for that to happen. If you politely let the recruiter know what you need to proceed, any recruiter ...


1

A key question for you to ask in your interview is "how will you and I know I am succeeding in this job?" Then the question about your work in the first few months will have some context in your conversation.


-1

As a Recruiter, I can share the reason even a very good recruiter is unlikely to send a job description- this is the equivalent of intellectual property to us! This information is what we use to feed our families, and many people will Google phrases from it and apply directly. This makes us unpaid search engines. If you want to know if a Recruiter is ...


2

Recruiters need to earn their money and our trust. There's plenty of other recruiters that will do you the minimum courtesy of sending a JD right away, which should include a pay range as well as a job location. The same goes if the JD doesn't even come close to what's in my resume, as they obviously haven't bothered to read it. If it's an email, I ...


17

Personally my approach would be to respond something like this: Thank you for your query. I am already in the process of interviewing with several potential employers, one of which sounds similar to the role you've described. Are you able to provide the company name and role? I do not wish to apply for the same role multiple times. If you ...


0

You don't have to justify asking for a job description. I never have and in all but one case the recruiter sent me the JD I asked for. If they cold call me, I sometimes will talk to them for a minute or so before asking for it. You say you tell the recruiter, "I won't go behind your back". Okay, but that's really not necessary. If a recruiter is afraid of ...


2

Many times the recruiter doesn't have a JD to give you. Possibilities are.. There is no job. The recruiter is really building up their list of candidates for expected future jobs. This is based on a client chat and not an actual position that's open, and the recruiter is trying to impress the client by presenting a list of candidates that match that chat....


38

I do the same thing. It helps to remember that for recruiters, it's a numbers game, and their incentive to hide the job description from you (assuming one exists) is to prevent you looking up the description and cutting them out. What this translates to is, if you play hardball, they usually budge. So make it clear to them that you don't want your CV going ...


18

I don't think it would be unreasonable at all to respond that you won't know if you are interested unless you can review the "opportunity" by reading the job description. Job titles are hardly enough information to make a decision on. If they can't respect the fact that you need information to make a decision, then you likely don't want to work with them.


1

If I were the one asking this question in a preliminary phone screening, I think what I'd be trying to get at is, "How familiar is this person with the company's mission and the work that we do?" In other words, how serious is this person about working with us? Did he take the time to learn about how we operate, our goals, and the challenges we face? What ...


6

I am still not sure how to answer Well, what will you try to accomplish in your first few months? Do you expect to be using that time learning the existing systems? Do you intend to spend the time building relationships? Will you try and ensure that the team is following modern best-practises? Will you keep your head down and get the lay of the land? What ...


0

If the recruiter has already sent the resume to the company AND they have read that email, there is likely a clause in their services contract that will obligate the company to pay the recruiter if they hire within a year. That, of course, depends on the agreement that they have negotiated. However, if they haven't sent the resume out, or the company hasn't ...


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