New answers tagged

2

I'll dissent from the other answers. You need to practice and become better at answering them. Look at your manager or the VP of your company. I'm pretty certain that when they receive those calls, they: stay polite make it appear as if they're happy to receive the call convey a strong no end the call in less than a minute or two When you manage to do this,...


1

You said, These calls are an annoying nuisance. What do I do? Do I just tell them to stop calling and take me off their list? While that has a very straightforward answer: yes tell them to stop calling, and/or just ignore their calls - you mentioned earlier in your question that you may potentially want those recruiters to check in 6 months from now "...


12

What do I do? Do I just tell them to stop calling and take me off their list? Yes, that's exactly what you do with someone when you no longer want them to call.


4

What do I do? Do I just tell them to stop calling and take me off their list? Yes, if there is a human on the line. "Please put me on your do-not-call list. Do not call me again." [hang up] Personally, I give absolutely zero information about myself, I've stopped even listening to them, and I'm the one who has become the broken record. On a side-note,...


2

You asked, In short, is the agency friend or foe? Neither - they're more like lawful neutral. They will generally follow whatever path has the best outcome for them. Sometimes, in a perfect world, that path also has a good outcome for the employer and the candidate. But in other situations, the three parties' objectives may not perfectly align, and some ...


1

The recruitment agency takes a percentage of the salary that the client pays. In this case employee and agency share the same interest. No, the potential employee and the recruiting agency may share an interest, but it's not necessarily the same exact interest. Let's say a competing candidate (without an agency) is willing to work for $100,000 a ...


12

Whether you take the job or not makes a huge difference to the recruitement agency. They get paid, or they get not paid. The payment may be dependent on the salary, but that is a very minor amount to them. So the motivation of the recruitement agency is to do anything to make the company offer you the job and to make you accept the job. So if the ...


2

All in all, the first and foremost target for the recruitment agency is to get you a job, because then they will get their commission. If you don't get (or accept) the job, there's no incentive for them. So they will try to convince both the parties: The applicant: that the job is good, and should accept the payment offered. The organization: that the ...


4

"Oh, SMALL jobs here and there" He might have information about you, but the same goes vice versa.


5

It's quite possible that there was no right answer to this question. The question was clearly intended to discomfort you and to amuse himself at your expense, which is not something any professional ought to be aiming for in an interview. It's quite likely that once he recognised you, he was no longer prepared to take you seriously as a candidate, and no ...


1

What to do when one of the interviewers knows something about me I'm reluctant to reveal publicly because it could reflect badly upon me and is nobody's business? Politely decline to answer. If asked why you are not going to answer, you remind them that the question is inappropriate. I say remind because any competent interviewer should already know ...


1

I fail to understand why these two things are related, that of you having worked as an escort in the past and wanting to work in the IT industry now. With that said: 1) Why is it the interviewers' business how you paid for your studies? It sounds like this interviewer was trying to get a rise out of you, and they got it. That interviewer is, pardon my ...


4

(Your question reads like there was someone else in there besides you two) If you're not ashamed by your previous career, and you sound like you aren't, then just own it! Not only did he know your secret, but you also knew his. Either way it's very likely that he'd have shared your secret with his collogue so just counter his power move with an even more ...


1

First, you have learned one important lesson: "Do not do that which you would not have known." While there is nothing that can be done abou the past, remember that going forward. For the here and now Your past is your past, some people will judge you, others will not. The important thing is that you do not judge yourself. You need to be at peace with ...


-7

One of the interviewers was a former client. He certainly recognized me and I botched the interview after he asked me with a smile how I financed university. I think you are reading too much into it, and his question is also pretty standard when interviewing graduates, one you will have to face again and again when doing interviews as it goes to ...


71

In my opinion, this is a one-off case, and the chances of this incident being repeated is slim (though, it exists). However, don't start to think negatively about this. You seem to appear as a very strong-willed person - not everyone can do what you did and achieve what you're achieved - thank you. Now, coming to the question you asked: What to do when ...


0

I understand you might not be willing to share details about how you financed your studies, though I respect your determination in pursuing a legal way to achieve your goal. Since you had clients in your previous job, it's plausible you will stumble into them if you are living in the same area where you exercised your activity. In a similar situation to the ...


5

What to do when the interviewer knows my little secret? should actually be: What to do when the interviewer knows our little secret? or maybe closer to the reality: What to do when I share a "little" secret with the interviewer? Joke aside, keep reading... Do what I do: do not answer for a few seconds, take a deep breath, allow your brain to think. ...


1

Rhetorical question (something to consider and maybe try): What happens if your brother says to the recruiter that he has withdrawn from all other job searches, but then doesn't actually do that? The same way as the company can say "we will give you an offer if you do this" and then they can choose to not field an offer, or field a bad offer that would be ...


6

Is it normal for headhunters to ask for written confirmation that candidate is pulling out of other interview processes before giving offer letter? Not at all, ant it might even be illegal. It goes against the concept of a free-market (the jobs market, that is). You might want to beat them with their own weapons: As per your request, I hereby guarantee ...


0

How to ensure privacy of job change? If you are applying to a halfway decent company, there is really nothing you need to do. Most companies are very concerned about the privacy of their candidates and manage this well. It's in their own best interest: if they leak an application, the candidate will most likely be mad and withdraw. If word gets out no one ...


1

So I am no expert on GDPR so I am not sure whether this is really not allowed. This means that you cannot ensure that it does not happen. However you can always politely ask. I have witnessed several times for instance that the name of a new (already hired employee) was still not shared with the rest of that future employee's team because that person had ...


25

This is known as an exploding offer. So what should you do if you receive an exploding offer? Exploding offers are anathema to your ability to effectively navigate the labor market. Thus, there is only one thing to do. Treat the offer as a non-offer unless the expiration window is widened. In no uncertain terms, convey that if the offer is ...


6

Since this is very fishy, I would be wondering where this requirement comes from: From the company, or from the recruiter? For a company, it doesn't make any sense. If I'm having interviews with four companies, I'm going to accept the best offers. If company A tells me I have to stop negotiating with B, C and D to even see A's offer, I then have the choice ...


47

Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? No, and yes. He was given the offer Tuesday noon and asked to respond Friday morning This is known as an 'exploding offer' and is almost always a red flag if the deadline provided doesn't have a clear rationale*. In most cases, job negotiations don't have real deadlines, and the only purpose ...


13

It is not acceptable. Just say "No, I'm sorry I won't be able to provide such documents". You can then add "I'm looking forward to reviewing the offer details and expect to accept it". And even some factual bit " I'm really excited about project X and technology Y." But if they won't extent an offer, you don't want to turn down other opportunities.


84

You asked, Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? That's an easy question: You should see something fishy here. The recruiter is clearly trying to trap your brother. If he actually does back out of all other hiring processes, he will have zero options. The recruiter's offer will be his only choice. He will be more likely to ...


120

Have him send a letter saying that, upon acceptance of any offer proffered, he is officially out of any other processes. Turn the tables on them and see what happens. They're trying to put themselves in the position that your brother has to take what they offer. Put it right back on them.


3

TL;DR Don't worry about it. I started interviewing new employers after 1.5 years on my first job. My notice period was one month, increasing to three months on the second year. During the course of interviewing my current employer, I crossed that threshold, and so I told the new employer my notice period is now three months. I was just as worried as you ...


10

A company will pick the most fitting candidate for a position among the many who apply. A candidate will pick the best offer among the set of received offers. It would be unreasonable for a company to expect a candidate to not do the above, and to sanction/blacklist any candidate who should opt for a better option. There are companies which would take a ...


4

More than likely if it is a company with reasonable hiring managers/policies, you will not be blacklisted for doing so. If you apply again in the near future, you may even have a chance to speed up the interview process as you have already passed it once. If you were to accept and then decline before starting, however, you would be more likely to be ...


2

This means that I have to give a one month notice period to company B, in case of leaving. After a two years, I’m required to give a two month notice. I fear that If I go over two years, recruiters won’t be see me as a good candidate, since I have to give a two month notice period. Some companies may hesitate at offering the job to someone who they'd ...


10

Remaining longer than X at a company typically does not hurt your future chances at other jobs. It's job hoppers (staying regularly for short stints only, less than say 2 or even 1 year) that can get problems from their job history. That's not a total given either, in some specific roles/CVs that's also generally okay (e.g., very project driven roles). If ...


1

These guys are checkbox tickers. They have a list and what it completed. I recently got offered a job, and HR insisted on my A levels as well as my masters degree, PhD and work recommandation letters after being in the workforce for more than a decade. This document was almost 25 years old. They didnt look at it, but could check the box. Just submit the ...


5

How do I deal with this in line with my principles, whilst maintaining professionalism? Should I just state that I am withdrawing from the process with no further explanation needed? When you are asked a question in an application/interview process, the best thing to do is to provide the answer to the question. If the question goes against your ...


15

You said, I think it is actually quite rude, implying I have a Mickey Mouse education. As much as you're entitled to your opinion, that strikes me as reading far too much in to what they've asked. Some employers ask the same things of all candidates, no matter the position, and they may not even consider the information important in every case. In other ...


4

My personal opinion of this is very very low I don't think this is necessarily insulting to you or your education. It could be that they are interested in your profile, and want a more detailed understanding of your education and professional career. It could also be that they are using this as a tie-breaker between you and other candidate(s)... I am ...


7

You don't have any bridges to burn! Going back to company A and C and say you have accepted another job. You don't need to explain more than that. You have never had any commitment to those companies, you never built any bridges with them to burn. Burning bridges is something you can do between yourself and your current employer / Client, not every random ...


9

Tell them the truth. It won't burn anything down. It will just show that you're a sought-after employee. They'll probably ask to connect to you on LinkedIn. They may even make you a counter-offer. And if you're paranoid, like I am. If they ask the name of the company who won you over, just give out a very generic description of what the company does ...


0

In my opinion, simply ask A and C that you've got offer from B that gives you more than what A and C are offering - if they can offer something better then you may finalize with them else you can reply on these lines: "all the best to them, you would definitely consider working with them in future." P.S. Companies know and accept that potential ...


3

Unless you signed a contract from company B I wouldn't reject the other offers just yet. Instead I would consider asking some more questions at companies A C to learn more about the role, but ultimately, to give you some extra time until you secure company B. You can only keep this up for so long, so if you still haven't signed with B then you need to make ...


-1

First off Stay away from discrimination against someone because of their "illnesses, disabilities, convictions, etc.". Knowing what not to do can be as (or more) important than knowing what to do. Don't ask anything too personal or anything related to topics people (in general) believe would be discriminatory. Under the laws enforced by EEOC, it is ...


7

(ASSUUMING USA) SOURCE: PERSONAL EXPERIENCE I would reach out to your local Vocational Rehabilitation office for some insights, and any charities for specific groups, such as the deaf, the blind, autistic, et cetera. These people specifically can help you craft questions, as well as give you a steady stream of potential candidates, and what ...


5

You asked, what approaches should I adopt in addition to, or differently from, what's typically used so that I can maximize both fairness as well as my company's interests I think the answer to that is basically "nothing." Do nothing differently from what's typically done. In other words, follow the typical process: determine what skills you need, and ...


1

Since you mentioned that this is a recruiter call, and not a direct interview for the company, I'd say, go ahead and ask about the other role you're more interested in. However, don't start with that discussion, have the scheduled discussion first, and then, additionally ask for more information on the other open positions for that organization. For the ...


2

When on the call tomorrow, how do I ask about whether that role will be opening soon? If this is something you want to find out, I would try not to mention it during your call tomorrow (which is for a different position). The interviewer may not know the answer to that. The exception would be if you see a proper moment or opening during the interview ...


1

You might consider contacting the recruiting team on the phone instead of via email. If you have a direct phone number, (or a name that you can ask for if you reach the switchboard) you should try to have the conversation live over the phone. A conversation that may take several back-and-forth exchanges could take several days to resolve via email, but only ...


2

I wouldn't overthink this. It's likely the recruiter has matched you via search tools, and may not have given too much of a look over your resume (may use tools similar to the clients ATS which score a match to the job description as they have no background to evaluate similar skills). It's also possible given they've given you info on the job that you ...


2

Your resume may be up to date, but most people's aren't. It's easy to upload your resume to one of those sites and then forget about it for a while. For myself, I haven't updated my resume in about a year, and it was about 2 years since I had updated it before that. I've done a lot of stuff in since that time and would definitely have quite a bit to add if a ...


0

It's usually 1 of 3 options: You are missing information. This is usually a time gap, including where you are currently employed. If you are unemployed, they are looking to see that time referenced on your resume. It can also be contact info, residential city, or even job duties that appear to be missing in your work experience. They are using a template (...


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