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2

In an interview, I'm looking for people who can take advantage of any available resources to achieve their goal more efficiently/effectively. If you were to say to me "When I get an exception, I sometimes post it on stack overflow to see what the problem is", I'm going to take that as a negative without additional context. It implies you don't know how to ...


0

Jobs are found in various ways, but are offered based on relationships (existing or developing a new one). If you liked the recruiter and genuinely feel the previous job was a "near miss" but this one is a much better fit, reach out to the recruiter. Having a human advocate is far better than getting lost in an automated processing bin. Also, a good ...


3

Generally, when applying for jobs, regardless of any prior knowledge or existing relationships, the first step should be to respect the employer's process. If an employer has a jobs portal, or all their positions are posted through some specific jobs website (i.e. linkedin or whatever), or the employer uses a specific third party recruiter for their hiring, ...


6

In my experience, when interviewing potential candidates I always watch out for people who DON'T mention Stackoverflow (or similar). I have a tendency to hire those that put SO at the end of the list of solutions to a problem, not those who put it first. As noted by others, SO is one tool in a developers toolbox. It shouldn't BE the toolbox. But it should ...


5

There's no right or wrong here, but usually we follow the same route thought which we received the information. If the open position was informed by a recruiter, go through them. If it's a direct communication from company, or you noticed the job post on company website while following up, apply in their portal.


3

I would ask to see some of the questions you asked, since they are public record. In your particular case, your questions seem well-structured and focused, and are not the sort of thing that's easily googled or that a colleague would necessarily know. I would consider questions like that to be a positive on your job application (although I might have some ...


0

Ask them to call you outside office hours. They expect you to have a job, and it's normal to be unable to make personal calls at work. Otherwise, you call them, and try again later if they're busy. Recruiting agents are optimists, they'll hope you have a private office and can take calls at any time, but they do know that doesn't apply to everyone.


6

If the qualities they are interviewing for include honesty and pragmatism, then telling them this will reflect favourably on you. You obviously have to gauge if this is a "what's your actual workflow on the job" or "demonstrate your skills and knowledge in a somewhat artificial way for the purposes of the interview" type question. But if it's the former, ...


5

You're not "not interested", you have a job with responsibilities Just because you hit some difficulties doesn't mean you're not interested. You want to be taken seriously as a good catch by a recruiter. Professional candidates are already hard-working people, so it doesn't look bad that you're too busy to wait all day for them. As long as you propose ...


12

Make it clear to them what you can and cannot do. So if they say to you "Can I call you Tuesday afternoon?" you say I'm sorry I'm going to be at work that time and I can't take outside calls. If you give me an exact time in advance I can arrange to be free then. Alternatively you can call me after work or at lunchtime. If they say "I don't know when I'...


7

This is what I've done in the past: Remove your phone number from your CV and job sites. Sign up for a service like Calendly or Google Calendar Appointments. Add your Calendly or GCA link to the Contact section of your CV Have recruiters pick a slot that suits them and have them leave you their number. Call them yourself. I had the exact problem and used ...


33

It depends. If you were interviewing with someone like me, it could be a mark against you, but I go all the way back to when the internet was text-based and you had to telnet into a BBS if you wanted to do anything. If I were interviewing you, I might ask some follow up questions like: Why wouldn't you ask a coworker? How would you ask a question without ...


9

It’s a good idea to write a question for stackoverflow where you precisely describe your problem. That’s because precisely describing your problem very often leads you directly to the solution. Obviously you are not going to post that question. It’s a good idea when there is third party code involved that you don’t understand and that is badly documented ...


166

What they are looking for is that you have a reasonably systematic approach to locating and solving a problem, over and above simply staring at the code, and a range of techniques and resources that you are familiar with that you can turn to. That could include any of: writing tests that characterise the problem adding logging / telemetry that will give you ...


14

There is no right or wrong in this case, it's a matter of perspective. I don't see mentioning about known online communities to be a problem, however, you may want to keep it a bit more generic (not to paint yourself as someone with no individual knowledge and fully dependent on Stack Overflow or other communities for coding, testing, debugging or ...


15

If you are not comfortable with being straightforward and want to play diplomatic, you can answer something like: "I'm not actively looking for a change right now, but I'm open to discussions". Then, if the discussion starts, you can actually show interest. There's nothing wrong in that.


0

I'm an American expat working in Belgium. I connected with an internationally known recruiting firm that landed me the current position I have. They got me interviews in the UK and in Belgium; my two top choices to relocate to. My email is in my profile if you'd like the name of the company I used.


1

I find that putting my CV on recruitment sites in the targetted country works; e.g Monster.com (I have never used LinkedIn for job hunting, and never felt the need to; YkMMV) . Of course, as you need a visa, you may not be as attractive as a local hire, but it can be done. I have worked, as software developer, on two continents and over a dozen countries ...


4

Given you have said they haven't yet made you an offer, in my mind there are two scenarios, depending on how you are feeling about the position: If you know that you no longer want the position, based on what you have seen so far, then you may as well withdraw your application, as there is no point in wasting further time on it. However, I don't think you ...


1

At the end of the day, if you have a list of questions to ask in order to make a decision about the job, you need to ask them! No point in joining and then realising you've made a huge mistake. I'd suggest something along these lines: Dear Mr Manger-Man, It was lovely to meet you the other day, and thank you for taking the time to interview me. I ...


2

Short Answer Use a different disposable email address for your job-hunt. And use a different phone number as well, preferably a Google Voice number (assuming Google Voice is available where you are located). Longer Answer Don't try to build a relationship with a spammer. The barrier to entry to become a recruiter is so low, anyone with a computer can be ...


0

But my question is, what is the best method for reacting to this sort of email from a recruiter who has not reviewed my profile or resume? For what it is worth, maybe they aren't lazy, it could be this: I briefly held a 6-month contract Business Analyst position as a trainee That's really all it takes to earn $500... giving them a name they can use. ...


2

Instead of ignoring the messages, mark them as "spam." This trains ESPs to put the messages in the spam folder instead of the inbox, blocking future messages to you and others getting these messages. When their "cold calls" stop getting delivered, it may encourage them to change their practices. Regardless, you'll stop getting those messages from this and ...


1

I always look at it as a pre-screening mechanism. If the company is sending me terribly matched jobs then they are a terrible recruiter and I don't want to do business with them. I delete the emails and move on. If a recruiter wants my interest then they need to do their jobs - step 1 being having and offering a job appropriate to my CV.


8

If you're based in Europe, a GDPR request on what data they hold on you, and then a second request asking them to delete your data costs them human time. If they don't have a fully automated system to handle this, and their data is in a bit of a mess, it can cost them £50-100 in person time. If they fail to respond within 1 month, you can escalate to a ...


2

I used to get emails like this from this one London agency. There wasn't a 'unsub' button in their emails and they clearly never even looked at my resume pass my email. SO every time I get an email I'd post a review about it on Google. I'd disclose all the details "No unsub button, didn't look at my resume" Eventually after 7 or 8 reviews they did add the '...


5

I've found that a polite email simply pointing out that you're not a good fit and then stressing your actual skills/experience is the response that's most likely to result in you actually getting a job out of the interaction. Something like; Hi [Insert-name], and thanks for emailing me. I'm not sure why you think I'd be a fit for foo when my skills are ...


17

If you can automate it or make it really quick, send back a reply that is polite and isn't likely to burn bridges but causes them to waste their time like they chose to waste yours. Our time is valuable - arguably the most valuable resource we will ever have. Our time wasted by reading their email is just as valuable as their time saved by not reading our ...


2

I'd like to re-frame the question for you: A recent graduate with only 3 months experience was hired for [insert_role]. Is this reasonable? Should internal applicants have been given preferential treatment, assuming they had appropriate credentials? This is a tricky question and somewhat subjective. My point is that, rightly or wrongly, companies ...


2

The OP stated I feel with internal promotions seniority and investing in loyal workers should have some significance. The managers of a company need to assemble the team most likely to succeed, given the constraints at hand. There are many factors, some of which are competitive, which must be considered. For example, there might be a superstar candidate ...


1

If you find a rare talent, you pay him a rare salary, or his next employer will. If this guy got that big of a raise, push for one yourself. In my own case, I took a process that was taking more than an entire workday to run, and got it down to a matter of minutes. Who's worth more, the people in the company who were there for years, or the new hire that ...


145

Ignore them... These emails aren't actually being sent out by humans, but automated systems that crunch your resume looking for keywords. The recruiters don't expect to hear back from you unless you are a match. The emails are generated by stringing the keywords on your resume, and inserting them on a form email. Then, the recruiter sits back and waits. ...


6

Ignore it. If you get too many emails from a given recruiter about irrelevant positions then mark them as spam. Most recruiters are just quasi-sentient spam bots anyways. You only need to worry about keeping in touch with the few good ones.


11

But my question is, what is the best method for reacting to this sort of email? Ignore it, optionally hitting 'Delete'. Ideally, set up a specific email account for all recruiter activity. If you're not actively looking, it won't keep pinging you and you can just clean it up once a week. If you reply with "thanks, not interested" to auto generated stuff,...


19

Ignore it, unfortunately it's par for the course when looking for jobs or signing up to recruitment websites. If you respond to them negatively then you run the risk of them not contacting you in the future even for relevant positions.


2

In general, men are taller than women. There's no scientific controversy over this, as there may be over statements like "fat people have an addiction" or "fat people have health problems." Yet plenty of women are taller than plenty of men. If you were to say "we need tall employees so we don't hire women" you would be wrong. Not just morally wrong, but ...


5

For work that don't require any physical strain, my personal experience with overweight people is that their alleged poor performance at work is entirely a prejudice. One can be eager to portrait overweight people as lazy, and may have a hard time going over preconceptions to focus on the actual value of the employee. some items such as general health are ...


-12

Fat people not really. But obese people often are addicted and like anyone with an addictive personality there are numerous dangers to employing them. They do not have the self control that others have. On top of that they can have serious health issues. Thats just general though, many people are not like that.


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