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72

I have been in that situation, and not only once, it is definitely an ugly decision to make. I decided to be open with my friend, and tell him that I don't feel like recommending him as I would only recommend people that I consider to be above average, and sorry, he isn't in my eyes. It is not necessary to word it that he is generally not above average (even ...


53

I don’t want to be responsible if he gets the job in my company and fails as my manager would probably blame me and would likely jeopardise my position here. If he gets the job, it won't be down to your recommendation. Recommended people still have to go through interviewing and tests etc.. If he makes it through all of these it is likely due to the hiring ...


46

As you clarified in the comment, your company has a public portal for job applications. Mention to your friend: We have this job portal and we're encouraged to inform any potential employee to check for the openings and apply online. This way, the process is smoother and unbiased. I'll send you the link, please let me know if you need any help / ...


36

If so, how would I approach this? I have the recruiters' contact info - should I just send an email summarizing these points? What potential repercussions could there be? Yes, you could email or call the recruiter and rescind the referral, but is that really a good idea? The question I would have to ask myself at this point is "Should I potentially ...


24

Is it appropriate to approach my boss (or someone else? HR?) and express my concerns? In short, no. Unless you are in a position to approve or make recommendations for new team members, I would stay out of it, especially since Bob has not officially applied. You may be entirely correct about Bob, but it is simply too risky to complain about a peer based ...


24

After reading the question it's not clear to me if the question is about a recomendation letter or a simple CV delivery. If the latter, that's not unusual and a hiring managers should be used to this. You could take the CV and say something like: Hi [hiring manager], here is a friend’s CV for [position]. Please don't take this as an endorsement, it's ...


22

Regardless of whether you and this person get along well or not, they did refer you to the company. Your only purpose in trying to take away the referral bonus is to be vindictive to someone who has treated you poorly. By even asking about preventing the referral, you will make yourself look petty and spiteful to the interviewers. Take your job, forget ...


18

If not the whole story, at what line should I draw in this conversation? I would suggest a two-step approach: Seems that you don't want to give that reference, so first try telling the manager about this, and that you would prefer not to give such reference and if someone else can do it. Best case, the manager understands your situation and asks someone ...


17

If you want to take her out for dinner, take her out for dinner, you don't need to rationalise it as a referral bribe or anything else, she's your friend.


15

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In the past, I've forwarded the resume to HR as a candidate without referral. I usually include verbiage something like this: "I'm ...


14

As you've pointed out in the comments of other answers, your company has a public portal for job applications but word-of-mouth and recommendations go a long ways in the application process. "Word of mouth is very strong, and you don't need to the tests." This complicates things, because a recommendation from you may very well lead to a hiring decision ...


13

Not gonna happen. Companies don't go around paying for unqualified leads - not individually, anyway. The administrative cost of sorting it out just makes it not worth it. Your best bet would be to get your friend to buy you a couple of beers if he uses the library.


13

Here is how you make everyone happy, make the referral and state exactly what you said here: "He studied computer science in school, has internship experience in software, and did research." "I did not study computer science and have no software experience (I studied English). I can't vouch for his technical skills objectively". Did he apply already or ...


12

Do not say anything negative or overtly damaging. That kind of sensitive feedback should come directly from Joe's manager. You can get into a real murky area if you say things that damage his reputation and cause loss of job and he finds out. Don't rehash previous bad projects, failed deployments, or anything like that. One thing that I have found works is ...


11

The answer is simple. You never managed him, you never worked with him in professional capacity ("We occasionally chat on the company messaging program. We talk outside of work every once in a while" is not "work") and you are not in-charge of the hiring process. Thus you never get to pass comments, let alone negative, before or during the allotment ...


10

Do Not ask them for a referral. What are you expecting them to tell about you when they never worked with you under professional settings? The only thing they know is that you added them on LinkedIn with some public information that you wrote about yourself. If you approach me for a referral this way, I would raise a flag and would make me question all ...


10

My question is - should I share that bonus with him ? No. He got the job, you get the bonus. Companies provide referral bonuses so that good professionals will recommend their company to their friends and so that other good professionals can be hired. And presumably you told your friend about the job, he was interested, and ultimately hired. Your friend ...


9

I usually refer people whom I know by simply mailing their profile details, a reason why I think they would be suitable for the position/role which I am refering them for along with a resume or CV of theirs, to the company's HR or whoever is in charge of hiring. My mail would look something like this: Dear , I am forwarding you a profile of Mr/Ms ...


8

Yes, you should notify the company. Referring someone generally comes with an implicit seal of approval from you. Perhaps more importantly, as their employee, you represent the company and revealing this information to them is in their best interest. There are a few conditions, however: New information If you had this information all along, trying to ...


8

So, by referring someone you give them a little head-start and then they are off on their own. The only thing you did is put knowledge of an opportunity in someones head. You can´t undo that! What you are now suggesting is the exact opposite: You´d dissuade them to employ said person. So you should ask yourself, what would you do if you did not refer the ...


7

It is called reciprocity. She did you a favour to help you out and you can thank her for the effort. I would personally do a nice dinner if it gets you the job otherwise you can get her a thank you gift. (woman like bottles of wines too). In general when people help you out return the favour or let them know you are happy. Because you ask about legality ...


7

First, try a thought exercise. Assume for the moment that the friend in question is incompetent, and go from there. It's pretty clear that his position in your hiring funnel has nothing to do with his ability or lack thereof. So, the manager is incompetent, and, further, doesn't seem to care about his own competence. He uses political positioning to ...


7

Don't stress too much. Send an email to the HR department. This is bread and butter for them. Ask them what the process is to claim it.


7

You say in a comment that your old employer is in New Zealand. Having worked in multiple New Zealand companies, my experience is that you should phone your ex-colleagues and ask them if they are willing to be references for you. No one would regard this as an intrusion, and you'll be more likely to reach them than by trying to hunt them down on a social ...


7

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In this context (you don't want to refer her) I would not forward her profile to HR at all. Doing that is in fact a form of referral and if you ...


6

To an extent how you answer depends on whether he's looking to use you as a reference, which would be strange, or if he just wants you to get his CV or application to someone in which case he's considered a "referral". The latter doesn't typically include you vouching for him. I'm sorry but since we never really worked together in an office setting I don'...


6

It's fairly standard in business to never give a bad review. That doesn't mean you have to give a good one. I've worked with Joe for a year now, and am familiar with his work habits. I have reviewed his work on several occasions and have made corrections where necessary. In short, you can damn someone with faint praise. People get the message. ...


6

Just drop a simple reminder, The post I talked about is coming to an end soon, are you still interested? This way if he wants to apply he can still send it in and he has been reminded, if not he'll likely either ignore you or just say no.


6

In many companies, referrals are a program where a bonus is offered for a successful hire. Someone who submits a referral under this program would be extremely unhappy to learn that someone else had already submitted a candidate for the same bonus. This would be in contrast to simply having someone informally pass along your resume to a hiring manager. In ...


5

Is it appropriate for me to contact the company as an intern about this, and if so, how? Perhaps a more professional approach would be for this person to apply on it's own, and you agreeing on being included as a reference or endorse him in other ways after he applies. In a way it could be ok to directly recommend him, but it is also a gamble, as you could ...


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