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435

In your shoes I would first speak to someone well-versed in employment law and see if their actions constitute a breach of trust. Their actions have clearly affected your working relationship to a point at which it is untenable (and I have to say I am impressed with your level of professionalism thus far - not sure I could manage that!). I think it's ...


352

Go for it. She sacrificed her job for you. Marry her while you're at it so people can't talk smack behind your back anymore. Because at that point, attacking a colleague's spouse is an HR issue.


346

Your manager is a prat1. I can't put it any more simply than that (well, I could but it would involve unprofessional language...) You've made it very clear that you've done everything possible to ensure that your car sharing doesn't affect your professional life. Frankly, how you get to work is your business and your manager should keep out of it. While ...


288

Fixing the bug is not your responsibility. should I provide the assistance for free since it is my morale responsibility No. It is not your moral or legal responsibility to provide free help. You are not their employee anymore. I made sure to leave extensive documentation on how to use the program and how to edit the source code should they need to. ...


285

What concerns me most is the attitude in the statement "he's put too much work into the company to just get fired just because I'm the boss." This is a person who has access to all the source code for your systems and as a team lead is likely to have production server access. This is a very dangerous person. With this attitude, he may very well be using the ...


249

You must separate private and professional life, and so must Josh. BTW, not that I am defending Jessica, but in splits there may be unknown quantities, things that no-one but J & J know about. Being a good friend, you are of course entitled to privately take unreservedly the side of Josh; but, being a good professional, you should keep in mind that you ...


232

Would it be inappropriate to purposely exclude this guy? It's your party. That means you get to invite whomever you like and exclude whomever you choose.


222

Take your car to a professional mechanic, don't mention it to your co-worker, and never hire a co-worker again. Eat the cost for a lesson you won't soon forget. It's not wise to do business with co-workers, relatives and friends precisely because things can go wrong. If you had hired a professional, you'd have no problem addressing these concerns.


211

At first she usually put it as a joke, but lately, she started openly insulting me in front of other colleagues with "just shave that, you look terribly" etc. Thats not okay. You need to push back against this yesterday. If this is repeating, it could be sexual harassment, or creating a hostile workplace, or both. If your uni has an administration HR or ...


211

Simple answer: You can't More complex answer: This is something your employee needs to work through like any other loss. You can give him an unofficial notice that it's affecting his work and recommend taking some time off, but that's about it. If you decide to go that route then do it in a friendly manner, quietly, one on one, and off the record. ...


208

No, it's not unprofessional. (and I echo Philip Kendalls' thoughts). Some organisations actively encourage car sharing - I used to work for a major clothing retailer in the UK and they offered a financial incentive (other than the obvious fuel saving) for people to travel into work together by way of discount vouchers that could be used in the staff ...


199

Unless Clint finds any major, “do not deploy”, bugs, I would simply thank him for his feedback and explain to him how you intend to address the points he raises (if valid) in future releases. If he has a problem with this, then you have the opportunity to explain why it would be better for him to give feedback earlier. Ultimately, it is his problem he is ...


197

I have always been an early starter, being in the office normally around 7am. There have been occasions where coworkers have made remarks as I leave at 4pm to go home to my family. I simply ask them, "what time did YOU start work this morning?" (with a smile). When I've informed them that I have been at work since 7am, it makes more sense to them. It ...


190

I don't agree with the other answers here, and coming from someone who has been in a similar situation - I'll explain. Don't ignore the problem Other answers have mentioned to skirt around the topic. My employer ignoring the issue would not have helped me recover. At the time, I didn't want anything to do with work. I felt no responsibility for my actions ...


184

If you are all peers, it is simply very, very rude. It sounds like you may not care about that, since the person who you want to exclude deserves to be excluded. If you are a manager, then it gets problematic, rather than just rude. According to Alison at AskAManager, you are opening yourself up to legitimate charges of favoritism. If you are in HR, ...


154

You may not be able to control your feelings, but you can control your actions. So the first thing, staring at your boss ( or any other employee ) is simply creepy and in some locations can be considered sexual harassment. When your co-workers talk bad about your boss, stay silent if you cannot participate without anger and aggression. Once again this ...


153

If this person is not your boss or a decision maker in the organization I would ignore him. If he is your superior however, do what he says even if it does not make any sense. You might want to run it past your boss just to assure yourself there is no problem. "Hey Boss, Coworker X thought that it would be a problem that I shared that article, but it ...


150

My answer - if the law where you are allows it - is lock the guy out of all his accounts (and the building) and fire him immediately. Let him collect his physical stuff, give him whatever severance pay is required and show him the door. My logic is that you will never be able to trust him again. He's already betrayed you personally, in spite of the ...


142

It's obvious your co-workers know your capabilities whether you "allow" your supervisor to shine or not. Just keep doing your work as impressively as you have been and treat your supervisor how you would want to be treated. The colleagues will notice the accommodating attitude


135

If he keeps behaving this way, you will have to confront him. Here's something you can try: "It's time for you to drop this. I know it's terribly amusing for you but I consider flirting with co-workers to be very unprofessional and I have no intention of doing anything. Please stop embarrassing me in public."


134

I think that in this situation, honest communication will do wonders for you. Typing up this question shows that you've thought through the problem in enough detail to express it to both your coworker and your supervisor. Tell coworkers that you have to get approval. You can say, "This looks like a great project, I'd like to devote some time to work on it; ...


130

It seems like a dreadful idea. Here's a few things that will happen, in addition to your developers and testers starting to hate each other and yourself for introducing this: Everyone will focus on low hanging fruit. This means that QA will start reporting all sorts of stuff that's actually fine but might be construed to be "buggy" in hopes of getting paid, ...


130

I dated someone from work at a similar size company who was senior to me (although I was not a direct report and she was the level below C-level). When we made our relationship public (shortly before she left that job) we found that almost everyone who had an opinion was really happy for us. We're married now, and there's no way that the opinion of anyone ...


123

No, there isn't. Brent is convinced he's being persecuted and actual reality will not sway him from that conviction. Let him go; he's on the edge. His next manager will also be a micromanager, and the next and the next. Random strangers may be micromanaging him after a while. Don't waste your effort pandering to his fantasies. It's not constructive and you ...


120

Give Unto Caesar What is Caesar's Assuming you are not the salesperson assigned to that client, your responsibility is to your employer. Your employer's responsibility is to the client. If the client is really only staying with the company because you are there, then the company had a responsibility to plan for the possibility you would leave. They should ...


120

This is not about profanity at all. It's about understanding (or accepting) that different people (and groups) have different rules. a new employee keeps saying "no profanity at work place" What is happening here? That person is trying to enforce his personal rules on the group. But he's not in position to make that rules. Simply point that out. You can ...


119

"How do I tell my boss that I need the money back that she never gave me?" You don't. As far as the law is concerned, she is in the clear: she paid you the wages she paid and you implicitly agreed to these wages by staying on the job and cashing these wages without a murmur(*). The only way you can claim any money back is if she paid you below the legal ...


119

This kind of person thrives on the idea that you are uncomfortable with his behaviour, and confronting him simply confirms to him that he is getting a response. Simply ignore it - if in the middle of the conversation or meeting, just continue as if the guy has not said anything at all. Otherwise, steer to a professional conversation. This person will stop ...


118

TL;DR - There is nothing, absolutely nothing you need / should do to react in a professional capacity. Just carry on, business as usual. I also act normal since I don’t merge my professional and personal spheres of life. I don't think you're very good at it. You are letting your personal issues (out of the office relationship) cloud your professional ...


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