The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

New answers tagged

8

I have a few golden rules for the workplace: Do good work. Ask questions when things aren't clear. Make sure you're getting clarification from the right person (usually, your boss). Respect others. I find that when I do these things, problems like favoritism have a way of taking care of themselves. Or, at least, you have a safety net to fall back on when ...


1

If the project manager is favoring you and relying on you more than your colleagues, this is usually an indication that you are doing good work and are considered more reliable than them. Continue to do the good work that you have been doing and don't worry about what your colleagues may think. If any conflict arises due to your doing your job well, it ...


1

Practically speaking, an HR department is usually constrained to considering candidates in comparison to a job description one or two levels of interpretation and rewriting removed from actual needs, or even more so in a large company. (In fairness, it sounds like the manager you have been speaking to is also not comparing you to specific openings, but ...


2

His last answer: "would it help to perhaps speak with the hiring manager to learn more?" I'm really not willing to take the role and don't want to loose the chance to speak to the regional manager (still not in the loop) I think you are taking this conversation with the hiring manager as an interview and not a call for seeking information. Depending on the ...


3

It sounds like the original job you're interested in is no longer available. Either that, or HR is incompetent at matching candidates to jobs. There are many reasons for this. For example project priorities may have shifted, they may have found a candidate already etc. Since you're already in contact with HR, they're trying to see if other areas may suit ...


10

Do nothing unless the situation affects the project and your team's part of the project in a significant way, and in a way that you can prove (so that it's not just your word vs theirs). Even in a real job, doing something about it would be iffy at best, and it would depend on the type of the job, on the environment and other people etc. On some jobs, yes. ...


54

Do nothing. Only do something if the relationship actually causes a problem within the team or their work they're doing. If all is fine within the team, leave them alone. If they want to disclose their status to the rest of the team (or individuals), let them make their choice on their own terms. Don't get involved.


Top 50 recent answers are included