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90

Not sure if my suggestion makes sense in an Indian context but here goes: You could Withdraw your complaint Get the verification Secure a new job Re-submit your complaint, or make a new one


83

What is a relieving letter? In India it is illegal for a person to have more than one job at a time. A relieving letter is issued by a company to an employee who has duly resigned from his said post, to be used as proof for future employers. When do you get a relieving letter? The relieving letter should be issued the same day you are going to leave ...


78

I think you should tell your boss that lack of promotion and pay increases contributed to your decision to leave. Your boss would be able to say to upper management "I told you we needed to pay Big Red more, you refused, and so Big Red left.", perhaps expressed more diplomatically. That would be useful ammunition the next time the boss is recommending a ...


31

This is an unpleasant situation - it's certainly not fair or right that the director is holding your verification to ransom in this manner. That said however - if there is no-one else in the company who can provide you with the verification (Company owner maybe?) then ultimately you're going to have to choose whether this is a stand you are willing to risk ...


20

There is nothing to gain from unfiltered honesty in an exit interview. If the company could not address your concerns while you were employed with them, chances are slim that they will change anything based on a short talk upon your departure. On the other hand, what you do say in an exit interview can hurt you. People can be offended when a co-worker ...


16

You can just say that you found an opportunity that better aligns with your career goals and leave it at that. You can mention the pay as another reason if you want to but your boss probably suspects it anyway.


15

I doubt that it is legal for someone to blackmail you like this, but it depends on the laws in your country and your contract. You need to go to a lawyer to get the correct advice in this case - that kind of behaviour is entirely unacceptable. As an aside, the boss is a fool, if he thinks you will produce good quality work whilst being blackmailed to stay....


12

Ripe for abuse? It is being abused even by what were some of the most reputed and respected brand names in India. Yes; what these employers do fits into the legal definition of "extortion". If an employee does not comply with the demands of the company, (s)he stands to lose the job offer from the new company. This tactic is especially prevalent in ...


11

The only situation where a manager can 'create issues' by adding some new tasks, is when you already had a list and projected dates of when you will be able to complete the tasks on hand, on the day you sent your resignation letter. If this is the case, you have to make sure you are managing expectations appropriately and keeping an electronic trail of all ...


11

In general, no. A notice period is a notice period and, unless explicitly specified, your friend needs to honour their notice period. They should not have accepted another job, government or otherwise, which had a start date before the end of their notice period.


10

I have no proof of employment to show my next company Actually, you are currently not employed. You have not been getting paid for your work and there is no documentation that proves that you have been doing any work for the past 7 months. When applying to new companies, use the experience and documentation from your previous legitimate employers and ...


9

One word of caution: it's very risky to be not fully honest during an interview. If you claim to have "pursued a personal interest" and then I would find out later that you were actually employed, I would fire you right away and also put you on the "do not hire" list. Mistakes and problems are negotiable, lying and dishonesty are not. I think it's okay to ...


9

It seems that But, my academic originals are in the present working company. and they won't give my certificates back. is your problem. You did not say what kind of academic originals it is. I assume it's degree diploma (certificate). I think the solution is easy. Go back to the institution where you received the academic degree/certificate from and ...


8

I'm not sure how it works in your country, but I would be very surprised if your current employer can tell a future employer not to hire you. I would be very, very surprised if they could prevent you from resigning as that effectively becomes slavery. As far as what to do, we tell you which you should choose, but a good rule of thumb is that once you have ...


8

Bullies enjoy power and hate it when that power is worked around or removed. Best way for that to happen for you to get alternative proof of employment and any proof you can of the situation you are in. Get copies of any e-mails relating to the complaint. Anything that goes back and forth to show that it is an on-going complaint. Send an email to the ...


7

I have worked in India for > 15 years, though I have worked predominantly in M.N.C's. Frankly it is Indian companies that ask for all sorts of 'paper work', 'original' marksheets etc. In MNCs I worked for, no paper was ever asked, even though offer letters did state that I had to submit the same on the date of joining. I joined my first company - first ...


7

If an extension is what you're effectively talking about, I think that you need to carefully balance the need of leaving on good terms with the risk of putting in danger your new opportunity. If I were in your new employer's shoes I'd personally struggle to understand the point of a prospect employee asking for more time to leave his current company (and why ...


7

You have two possibilities here: Either you take the offer from your new employer, and you hand your resignation to your current employer. Check your local laws on how to write & post such a resignation, and what elements have to be defined (date of your last workday – look up how long they can legally force you to keep working there) Or, you decide to ...


7

As the old saying goes, fool me once shame on you, fool me twice... I do know India has horrible employment laws and you need to be "relieved" by your current employer before going elsewhere. As such, I would go ask a lawyer.


6

What shall I do next! Can any one provide me some suggestion. It sounds like your contract requires you to stay for another 8 months. Unless there is something written into your contract that guarantees you a raise, there's nothing left to be done. Do the best you can until then. Be the best employee you can be. At the end of the 8 months, discuss your ...


6

Talk to a labour lawyer immediately. What they are trying to do is likely illegal however local law and the specifics of your contract will come into play. Don't talk to your new employer until your labour lawyer advises you that it is ok. Trouble with your start date could make the new employer decide against hiring you, so be 100% sure about your ...


6

For dealing with hr, it may affect any future applications. I would consider if it would be worthy mentioning the experience on your CV. However, if you are dealing with an experienced professional that knows an employee only starts adding value around 1 year, he may see through it that it was written in spite and your former bosses were unprofessional ...


6

Now I am planning to quit the job in this company. Good better late than never. If I get the job in the other company what should I answer if they ask Why are you quitting the previous company and they asked for the documents like offer letter and relieving letter and pay slips. You can tell them the truth. Most probably what they will be more concerned ...


6

Now, I don't want to learn that new framework and work on it and I want to leave early from my current role. That's your problem. You "assumed" things here, which you were not supposed to. Company has all the rights to ensure you are not relieved before the completion of the entire notice period, as mentioned in the contract. Till the time company is ...


5

Until you leave your current job, you are still working at that job. This applies whether you are on a "i'm leaving" notice period or not. This means you and your employer are bound by whatever agreements may be in place. You may have a contract, or your union may have a contract, that determines what is allowed to occur during a notice period. If you're ...


5

Just say NO. You owe no obligation to your current employer. In my opinion he is clearly trying to sabotage your new offer. 2 months is a huge notice period anyway. This may be common in some parts of the world, but in the US 2 weeks is normal and almost always enough. I have given notice about 8 times over a 20 year work history. Only once was 2 weeks ...


5

I resigned at this company at the first week of February, my present company notice period is 2 months. My date of joining at the new company is March 25. Obviously, that was a mistake. You should have agreed to a starting date that was 2 months or more after your resignation date. My reporting manager says once he finds my replacement and if i have ...


5

It sounds like you're still in the process of getting a job. Be sure you have a job and offer in hand before turning in your notice. Let me first say that don't be surprised or offended if you turn in your 2 weeks and nobody seems to care. Chances are they'll just say goodbye, good luck and do the standard 2 weeks and find a new employee. With that said, ...


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