388

Tell them that you are relocating, there is no shame in this. No reasonable employer will form a negative opinion of you due to the fact that you are relocating to be with your husband. Any employer that has a problem with you prioritizing your family over your career is not a employer worth working for.


186

If your primary goal here is to avoid burning bridges, then I think this is one of the rare situations where you should probably admit you're planning to leave. Yes, you might get burned for it (ie: let go before you wanted to leave) but at least in that case, it's not you who's burning bridges. Lying when your boss already has solid reason to suspect you'...


170

Is it wrong to expect that they continue my current pay scale if they want me to continue to work for them from a different location due to an administrative mistake ? Nope, and you should tell them such. If I were you, I would rather leave to work for another company in my home country versus taking such an insulting low ball offer. They may be ...


169

There's no harm in asking, but you probably shouldn't be expecting them to allow you to take a cash alternative. The chances are that they're paying for business class flights because they want you to be able to get off the plane at the other end in a fit state to start working and not because it's a luxury perk. My suggestion is to make the most of it, ...


159

The general rule I follow for applying for jobs is that if I want it, I apply without worrying about minor things that might not work out. I would recommend you follow that here as well. Specifically, it seems really unlikely that they'll care that you're remote if you are willing to pay the relocation expenses. The only sticking point I can think of is ...


140

I have a friend who is a successful telesales manager and he told me he likes clear yes and clear no because clear answers don't waste anybody's time. For that reason I suggest you tell him in the first minute that you appreciate his call but don't want to waste his time. Is the job he offers in xyz? If yes, fine. If no, thanks, maybe next time. The ...


124

I am pretty sure that those 4 round trip flights would be considered a business expense. However, if your company paid off your student loans this would not be considered a business expense. There are tax implications.


109

Talk to your manager, not HR. I've seen this happen before, including with an employee I managed. Not everyone wins the H1-B lottery and the best the company can do is to have you work remote in another country such as Canada for 12-18 months. After that period, you can be eligible for an L1 visa or similar, then come back to the United States. The pay ...


94

Your specific question was, My question is whether this is an appropriate thing to ask of my prospective employer in the first place, and if so, how I would go about phrasing this question. Given how eager the employer is to support your decision making process, it seems perfectly reasonable that you would want to bring your significant other along - ...


89

I would simply tell them that I have decided to move to their city. Whether it is to be with a fiance, to care for an aging parent, or simply because you prefer the weather, scenery, and nightlife is not relevant. It is worth mentioning that your job search is not related to not liking your current job. But I would caution against over-revealing your ...


89

You need to remember that recruiters get paid a high percentage of their wages through commission. The recruiters job is to get you from just a CV, to interviewing and hopefully joining a company. 90% of the time, they are only there to try and fill a role that the prospective employer has open. If the recruiter is still in contact with you it is highly ...


81

Some of the reasons why conventional wisdom says, 'No, don't quit your job until you have another one lined up': Job searches can take a LONG time, often many months or even years. That's a long time to be out of work with no income and no active experience. (And a side project might or might not convince them it is continuing experience.) People who are ...


75

Be upfront about it. Offering a slightly different angle: I wouldn't worry about getting fired early if you are are upfront about it. I hear this argument a lot, but personally I haven't seen a single case where that has actually happened (in a decent work relationship). In contrast, I have seen multiple cases, where the departure was announced early, ...


73

My question is, what is the next step in this negotiation or is this where I decline the offer and walk away? If you are firm on what you require, and you believe they are firm on what they offering that doesn't meet your requirements, then it's time to walk away. If you think they still have room to improve, then state your requirements one more time, ...


68

There's a conflict here between two different things: What's a reasonable salary for a remote worker in your location doing your job? Assuming they really are adjusting correctly for the local market, the lower figure is a reasonable salary for the role. If the cut is too much then you could get a higher-paying job from someone else in your new location. ...


51

My husband recently got a new job that he really wanted, but the office is in a different city Nothing wrong in supporting a spouse/partner in a great opportunity. some of them said that potential employers might think that I value family way more than my career Good, your family and partner matter more than a job, you can make your career just as well ...


47

There are reasons why your company might want their employees to fly business class instead economy class: They see a business value in ensuring that their employees are relaxed when they arrive at their destination, because they believe that it will help them to work better. It's a prestige thing. They want to show everyone that they care about their ...


47

It means no visa sponsorship and no relocation fees. If you're willing to relocate on your own dime, they don't have a problem with it. You can even mention to them that you'd be willing to have written into your contract, as a condition of employment, to relocate on your own within X miles of their location. But no, it's never inappropriate to apply for ...


45

Literally, just ask them. This is not rocket science. Them: Hi Cameron! Do you have a few minutes to talk about a potential opportunity? You: Sure, why not. Just to check, though, is it roughly within <area>? As I'm not looking for work outside of that. Them: No it isn't. It's in <place>. You: Hmm, in that case, it's probably ...


42

Ask for time to consider the offer. Go away, think about what he's said and along with the views you expressed here (as long as none of them change) you use what he said to show that you've thought long and hard about it and reject the offer in a polite but respectful way, i.e. as you have described it here, describe it to him. I'm sure he'll understand ...


41

Offering relocation assistance and hiring people who don't live in the area are two different concerns. Typically, job postings that offer relocation are offering relocation assistance. Often, this is some kind of compensation to cover moving expenses, finding a place to live in the new job location, and other things associated with getting from your ...


41

It is appropriate to ask, as spending time with family is a valid reason. However, as mikeazo has pointed out, they might not say "yes" due to tax issues, and also as they are mid-way through the process and wouldn't prefer stalling the process. Having said that, it is completely appropriate to ask. So, go ahead and make a request. The worst thing that can ...


40

Whenever I tell a local colleague about this decision I am met with something like, "Why would you want to leave here?" or "Whats wrong with this region?". It seems like people are offended that I don't want to settle down and live where they do. How can I handle this in a professional manner? I get this question almost every day and simply ...


38

It is too easy to look at salary amount and make a blanket value statement as to whether a compensation package is better or worse. But to truly compare compensation packages, you need to take a lot of other factors into account. These can include other additional compensation elements such as : Incentive Pay (Bonuses) Annual Vacation/Sick Time Corporate ...


37

Would it be okay to just honestly answer that I like my job, but I have to relocate because of my husband's new job? Answering honestly is virtually always the correct course of action. Even more so in this case - the reason is perfectly reasonable. Many (including me) would say that relocating due to family is the best reason of all for finding a new ...


36

First of all, and maybe a little unrelated but definitely important: do not tell a potential employer your current salary. Why are you telling them your current salary? If for some reason you're determined to tell them your current salary, then the key word you want to focus on is "lifestyle". You need to explain to them the following: To continue living ...


34

Be honest with them. Explain your situation. Make sure you tell them that you are sorry and that this was an unexpected move. Maybe they'll let you work for a few weeks, maybe not. Either way, you'll get to be an honest person and keep your dignity. You'll feel better for it.


33

Unfortunately, HR did not file paperwork on time, and my visa will expire in a month. Lesson learned here: NEVER let HR handle an immigration issue for you. I've seen departments even in otherwise well run companies that were impressively incompetent. You need to stay in the drivers seat and check and nag at least once a week. Is it wrong to expect that ...


28

No do not put that in your resume. In the first place, you may change your mind. In the second place, a resume is to sell yourself. You indicate you want to relocate by the jobs you submit the resume for. It isn't there to make recruiters jobs easier. adding @MattRidge's comment: Although this has already been answered, I'd like to add a caveat to it. ...


27

You can always ask for anything. There's a possibility that someone in the company thought it would be nicer for you to relocate before Christmas and was suggesting it for that reason - to keep you happy. If it turns out that relocating after Christmas is better for you, that person will be only to happy to change the date, and would actually be upset if ...


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