192

Why do remote companies require working in the US? Those companies are likely based in the US and don't want to deal with the legal and tax complexities of having employees who live in multiple countries. It is complicated enough for some companies to deal with employees from various states within the US. Also having employees from around the world will ...


88

There are many potential reasons for a company to discriminate based upon your country. Tax Reasons Taxes can get very complex, very quickly. Even if your country allows you to take on all of the tax responsibilities, which is relatively uncommon, the company will have to spend money even getting an expert on your country's laws to confirm this. Otherwise, ...


86

Alice openly expresses her dislike for Bob (to me, the rest of the team, and sometimes customers) Expressing dislike of a teammate to a customer is such an egregious violation of the norms of professional behavior that I'd warn her never to do that again, and fire her if she did so.


46

There is nothing wrong with two employees not liking each other, provided they conduct themselves in a professional manner. For instance, it is very bad that Alice tells others that she does not like Bob. That is unprofessional and unacceptable. Regardless of how they feel about each other, as a manager you need to have an expectation that they communicate ...


19

Go over there, don't try to fix it by calls. Get the three of you in a room. Explain the situation as you experience it. Explain the consequences of their behavior towards customers, team performance and their professional advance. Listen to their side of the story, do not judge them. Ask them how they think the situation can improve and what they think is ...


14

It is perfectly fine to ask this during an interview, and working from home is becoming more common now, especially for workers with kids at home or other responsibilities. At some point during the interview they will usually ask you if you have any questions. This is a good time to ask some questions, such as "will I usually be working from this office", "...


12

I think the only mistake you made was referring to it as a "sad demo." You shouldn't criticize your own work, especially when you aren't the sole contributor. In doing so, you kind of dragged your coworker down with you. What you could have done was to proudly demo the work that you had and if someone asked about the missing feature, said something along ...


10

As a permanent employee, your employer will have tax and social security costs related to you, which would be complicated by your being in a different country. Your employer would not necessarily know what these implications are, and there is no incentive for them to find out; they can generally get an equivalently qualified employee in the USA. The easy ...


10

The raise was reflected on my salary on the next pay but the remote work wasn't. How do you know it has not been reflected? The perk entitles you to have the facility, but does not impose that on you. In other words, no one is going to come to you and ask which day you want to avail WFH facility. Just like no one asks you to use the coffee machine next to ...


10

Another thing that might be important to note is that the three of us are long-time friends outside of work. This is probably the most important part to take into account since this issue is likely to affect your friendship or even end it forever. I wouldn’t talk to your manager behind his back, you owe him at least a warning before it comes to that. ...


6

If your contract don't state place (or method) of where work should be performed then adding such requirment would require appendix to your contract. And that leave you open for negotiation. Requiring you to commute to workplace means your income will be lower. You agreed on X pay based on the fact that you will work from home. Commute will change that pay ...


6

Does this counts as a remote work experience? No, because you're not working remotely, separate from everyone else. Your team is just working in a separate office, that's all. But in any case: Should I list it in my resume? I don't see how this is a particularly valuable thing to list on a resume. I'd just glance past that as "fluff". It may have some ...


6

It's more complicated. You can work as an independent contractor from outside the country without a visa. However some companies will not want to employ overseas contractors for reasons including (but not limited to): Timezone differences Employment law differences Payroll difficulties If you see a requirement for a visa you can assume you need to be ...


5

How can I find this out during the interview process, without sounding like I won't show up to the office every day? "Is there a remote work option?" "Does the company have a work from home policy?" Either of these will do the trick. Neither of those make you sound like you won't show up in the office.


4

It should be fine, especially if it’s remote work ie you’re connecting via Remote Desktop or something. Even working “for” the company but offline on your laptop is fine. It won’t affect your tax status for either country; you’re not there long enough. Up until Dec 2016, I spent nearly 5 years doing this between UK and Spain. The only issues the company ...


3

I joined this company around 1.5 months ago They've just hired one more person ... and now the lead person in the UK Your company has hired 2 people in less than 2 months, can it be on an expansion mode? Since the newest member is a lead, maybe he knows about these plans more than you would? Now the lead person in the UK (London) says we will get an ...


3

How should i approach my employer in a professional manner to ask about it? Approach your boss with something similar to: Hey boss, thanks for the raise! I notice that it comes with the offer of working one day a week remotely; that's something I'd be interested in exploring. How would you suggest moving forward?


3

I think you probably did make a couple of missteps in the handling of this situation, namely: Calling out the missing feature in the meeting in the manner you did. It's fine to point out that there is additional work to do, but you shouldn't undersell the work already done and you certainly shouldn't put yourself in a position where you have to lay the ...


3

Do the same thing you would do if you, when under pressure, said "This place is a huge mess" to your partner or roommate about your apartment. Apologize. Tell the person the pressure got the better of you. Remind the person they did good work for you and your team. Don't overthink it.


3

Is it possible to apply and get job at some phone company or telemarketing companies without fluent english? It's possible, but unlikely. Most English-language-based telemarketing companies or companies requiring English language phone work will require pretty good English skills. A few might train you. But the only way you'll know for sure is to read ...


3

My first step would be trying to establish a baseline for productivity. This may be quite difficult given your work, but if you do somehow convince management to give it a shot they will probably be watching you like a hawk, so you do want some hard data to support you. You basically have to get your foot in the door with this. Suggest a trial day, once a ...


3

I can only assume, that companies that hiring people to work remotely doesn't care where did you work before, but what you actually can do. I think they don't want to waste time and call each company you've worked with, and ask how were you performing - checking out your apps is easier/faster in my opinion. I'm a remote worker (front-end web) - during my ...


2

We all have to admit it: No one wants to buy an idea which only have the positive side, because it "sounds" too good to be true. You advocated for the remote work, which will help increasing the productivity, sure, but did you also mentioned the downsides that comes with it and how do you plan to overcome the problems? Most likely not and that is why you ...


2

This is hard to answer without knowing the culture of the company and what your relationship with them is like, and I think that goes to why people are conflicted about when you should talk to them. How good your relationship is there will probably need to govern how much you tell them. If you're not sure, I would suggest that you tell them you are thinking ...


2

The most defining parts of remote work (in my experience working remotely) are You don't work in an office. You're responsible for finding an area (and/or mindset) that allows you to focus and be productive, and shield yourself from distractions. Don't underestimate the difficulty of this. Sitting at your kitchen table is a lot different from sitting at an ...


2

Google gives many results for "Completing I-9 for Remote Employees:" https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/how-to-comply-i9-requirements-remote-workers.aspx https://www.ebiinc.com/resources/blog/i-9-verification-for-remote-employees https://www.lawlogix.com/top-5-best-practices-for-remote-i-9-compliance/ https://www....


2

How do I politely tell them I'd like to keep my current working setup if/when they move the rest of the UK people into that small open office? You just talk. You explain, as you have here, that you would prefer to continue working from home, and you explain why. I do not have any worry about them saying "no" as I can find another contract within a ...


2

Is it time to raise the issue to our manager? Yes If so, how? Tell them what you told us. If possible, have it documented.


1

I understand your concerns and seems like you are reasonable right about doing something about the situation. As others mentioned before, you as a manager really can't make two people like each other, but it is your job to make them both work as a team and also don't badmouth each other to other people. The idea is straight-forward, but the execution ...


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