139

I would suggest being forward on your first interview / CV stage and state that XXX has a personal grudge against you and you don`t want to get in to the details due to being non-confrontational person etc. State that your previous in-company move was due to him hounding you. This way you would move whatever he says about your from professional to ...


131

NO There are so many reasons why this is a bad idea, but the bottom line is it was a business decision to terminate the employment. It is very disrespectful to go around afterward and gossip about why they were let go. They have no opportunity to respond to the allegations you would be making, and it might open you up to legal trouble. To be most safe ...


110

It depends on how you got it. If it was a simple accident, embellish. Tell the heroic tale of opening the cupboard and finding a loose can falling towards your face. Make it sound like Homer's epic. If it was caused by something negative then "I don't really want to talk about it" will do. If it was some heroic event (like the time I got a black eye, fat ...


95

You're potentially being employed to work on the app with a view to improving it. Even if the app never gets above that one star, there's nothing wrong with working on the project and adding this to your portfolio. After all, with large companies, there's an awful lot of politics, red tape, processes, mis-management that can all contribute to a bad app ...


91

Another possibility is to sidestep the question with humor. For example, After I firmly wedged the bear's jaws around my arm, I threw it down on top of me and beat its paw senseless with my face. It's so unrealistic, nobody will accuse you of lying; it's humorous, so people might well get a laugh; it implies that only an insensitive clod would pry ...


72

Badmouthing you is a very risky business. You didn't say which country you are in; in many countries you could take the company to court and win a good amount if they said bad things about you unless they were true (and even then they might lose). Do they have a moral point: Your employment had a first day and will have a last day. From the first day to ...


62

A few thoughts: Last Friday a friend of mind from the company I have had an absolutely fantastic interview last week, after which I received super short rejection email, told me everyone approved me, but last week they received an email from my current boss telling them not to hire me, because "I am conflicting" and "will certainly cause problems". You ...


53

I think the real problem here is that your boss knows you are looking for employment elsewhere, and also seems to know with whom and when you are interviewing for jobs. How is he getting this information? If you can block his access to this information, he can't run interference on your job hunting. If the industry is so small that this is not feasible, you ...


41

What should I do in this dilemma? Am I allowed to ruin his reputation in this team, or should I just pray that this behavior isn't repeated again? No. Remain professional. Don't ruin anybody's reputation. Even after being fired, former employees deserve to be treated professionally and with respect. They may have not fit the job well, but they ...


38

Don't lie--it's wrong and it will probably make things worse in the long run. State firmly and politely that you don't want to talk about it. You can also say "I'm fine," which I think in this context is socially understood to mean "I'm not having a problem I want you to help me with," which is certainly your prerogative. EDIT to clarify, I mean a casual "...


36

Don’t know the Swedish law. In other countries you could sue the boss for defamation, and the new company would be asked by the court what exactly they were told (and not giving everything that was said would be a criminal offence). Contact a lawyer.


31

Can working on a mobile app with 1 star affect my career? Yes, it most certainly can. Typically, I would not install a one star rated application for all kinds of reasons. Based on my hiring experience, I would suggest you leave it off your resume unless you have no other option. If you have to leave it on your resume, do whatever you can (fix bugs, ...


29

It depends on how you tell the story. If, in your future resume, you just write that you were part of the team that worked on this terrible app, then yes, that could go poorly for you. Don't do that. If you instead write that you were brought on to help fix the terrible app (after it was already known to be terrible), then it's a lot less likely to damage ...


29

I wouldn't include it. While that's a solid amount of reputation it would strike me as irrelevant information for a resume and even then, I would put it as a side note for the reader. Only in the most extreme cases (top .01% for example) would I think it appropriate to highlight on your resume. Having a high stack overflow ranking doesn't really pertain ...


25

Now I am having a panic attack and trying to calm myself with whiskey while my wife and kids are watching a movie. I'm going to ignore the work side of things and focus on the personal - because other answers cover the work perfectly. Your question gives the strong impression that you're trying to handle the whole situation yourself, on your own. Don't. ...


24

Is this slander or defamation? Well, surely this is speaking bad of you, and perhaps seeking to hurt your professional reputation. This could well be because this woman is jealous of you or your professional success. Should I go to HR and explain the situation to them? Absolutely not. This woman does not work in your company (nor is she telling ...


24

I felt like giving the risky advice here. First, I find it weird that the lawyer said this was his right of speech. I'm not aware of Sweden legislation, but it's hard to believe he can prevent you from getting a job that effectively without lying and actively seeking your potential employers, and this should be diffamation anywhere in the world. Was this a ...


23

She doesn't know where I work or what I do. She doesn't have any evidence to back up her opinion. I think that right there is all that really matters. It is a non-issue. Don't go to HR or even bother mentioning this to anyone at your workplace. All that matters is your comment: I'm known around the office as a competent and trust worthy employee Have ...


21

No organization should expect an employee to remain until all projects they are involve in have completed and in my professional experience, none has. If you leave abruptly without customary notice, you may leave hard feelings behind or damage your reputation. And there is a bit of humor around how everything that goes wrong for the next six months is the ...


18

How about just doing what you agreed on to do (in your contract, in verbal agreements up to now, in written procedures etc), instead of letting it depend on how you feel? They pay your salary during the notice period, don't they? Would you want your boss to have the same attitude towards you during your notice period, i.e. Well I don't feel like paying him ...


18

As Snow mentions in his answer it's likely that you (if you take the job) would be being hired to improve the app - and hopefully raise it's rating in the process. If you manged to pull such a thing off then it could be a very beneficial thing to have on your resume, and one you could justifiably use to blow your own trumpet. So can you do this? In my mind ...


18

Talk to your boss, don't rant about "sexiest projects and reputation" but highlight facts and business values: The company will spread this knowledge between two, instead of just one, employees. Even if your colleague won't ever leave the company, the bus factor is currently a significant businesses risk. You need those kind of projects to diversify your ...


16

Find a co-worker or another manager (or several) who was impressed with you, and cite them instead. The reference doesn't have to be your first-line manager. . If the interviewers ask (which they may not), give the briefest and least emotional version possible of what you told us: "X couldn't find a replacement for me at that salary, and from what I've ...


16

YES. The previous answers did not address the question as asked, namely: If I disclose the reason behind termination, everybody agrees with me that it was right, but this behavior in particular wasn't in front of other ones eyes, so they didn't notice it. What I'm most afraid is that they may think that termination had some other reasons, ...


16

Context is very important for this question. Large companies generally handle it differently from small ones. The largest we ever got was 11 people. If someone left, there were lots of questions in the minds of those remaining. Along with "who is going to finish that work?" and "what are we telling clients if they ask?" there was often also "is this ...


14

will my company have the right to badmouth me/not recommend my services because I am leaving according to my own needs? Everyone has the right to badmouth anyone they choose. And nobody is obligated to recommend your services, should they choose not to do so. Unless slanderous or libelous, what someone says about you isn't under your control. That said, ...


14

You've got your foot in the door, that's the hard part. From here I would make sure the work you are given is impeccable. You've got to build a stable of good references to offset the bad ones. As an aside, a lot of this reads as my problems are everyone else's fault. Most of the time, when it comes to conflicts like the ones you describe, the truth is ...


14

Here's something from a different perspective. I have made a career of cleaning up messes. If you are confident that you can turn the app around, this is a wonderful opportunity. Me personal best was taking a process that was 10+ hours to run and bringing it down to 6 minutes. "improved XYZ app, brought it's rating up from 1 star to 3 stars". Now, if ...


14

Games are serious stuff. Unless they've been badly received, then it makes sense to highlight these in your resume. Be prepared, however, to discuss any coding techniques, frameworks, integrations and issues you overcame in designing and building these apps. Don't shove these to the back of your resume and attempt to play them down, there's valuable code ...


12

There's nothing wrong with admitting you don't know something. I'm a Sysadmin but there was a time where I didn't know what a SAN was. Not knowing is ok. Not willing to change that? That's where your issue can come about. Instead of saying "I don't know", say something like "I don't know how to do that but I'm happy to figure it out." As for saying you can'...


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