196

Do not sign anything more from your current employer for any reason. You’re doing well there. Block them all on LinkedIn and social media. Do not share any further information about your future plans, even “not the same industry”, with them. “That’s none of your business” is answer enough, and they have been unprofessional enough you’d be justified in not ...


75

I suggest you contact a lawyer and lay out what your former employer is doing. What's going on here would seem to be a type of harassment. They may be able to write up a letter which can be forceful enough to cause the company to cease their negative behaviour towards you.


54

Show up, but assume you will be fired and put your main effort into getting the next job. You show up so you continue to make a salary, and so that you can say you're still employed while searching for a job (which will make you both look more attractive as an employee and give you negotiating leverage if an offer is made). Although taking one sick day to ...


29

Aside from what you’ve already been doing, I recommend not updating your LinkedIn with your new employer until after you pass your probation there. You should also block new connection notifications on your linkedin and try to avoid connecting with new colleagues for a while, if possible.


23

Should I even show up tomorrow? Yes, you should show up at work tomorrow if you have not got a new job offer yet, and if you still need the paychecks to pay the bills. Even if you no longer love this current job, it still is a source of income. While you are working for this company on PIP, please make sure to look for a new job outside work hours. If you ...


18

Yes, they can. There is nothing illegal about an employer asking an employee not to spread certain information to other employees. It's their company, not yours, so they can run it how they see fit within the bounds of the law. As long as you are an employee, and you still are until your last day, disobeying them is tantamount to insubordination and carries ...


17

Do you have a non-compete signed already? If no, and you don't sign this new one; then tell them to go pound sand. Do not sign anything, you have no obligation to sign paperwork from them and doing so can only hurt you. You owe them absolutely nothing and they way they're acting is honestly insane. If you've signed an offer letter with the next company and ...


12

Call them one final time. If you can, record the conversation. Keep and print your email communication with them regarding this. Pack the equipment up in an appropriate box or storage container with the printed communication. Store the box or storage container in an appropriate place. Take no further action or attempt any further communication.


11

In many cases, a PIP is a thinly veiled information gathering to build a file to fire you for cause. Unless your company is has a history of people surviving PIPs, your chances are slightly better chance than computing the last digit of Pi in your head. That said, go to work, do your job, and follow the PIP to the LETTER and give them no excuse to fire you. ...


11

Besides pulling my manager apart and breaking the news is there anything I can do or say to not burn any bridge (might not be possible) or to just handle things as best as possible? Just be honest and explain the lack of fit. That's what probation periods are for.


10

There is a MASSIVE difference in the potential productive output between someone who is 4-7 years experienced on a platform and proficient in the task they're working on, and someone else with less experience or who's still being on boarded. This is normal and it's no reason to quit. You will be slower, for a while. This doesn't matter. All you need to do is ...


9

Use their unprofessional LinkedIn activity against them Since they are currently (and improperly) surveilling your LinkedIn profile for the answer to a particular question, use that against them. Create a flurry of LinkedIn activity that seems to answer their question. For instance, add 5 new friends all from the same company (that isn't the company you are ...


8

My interpretation of your employer's actions is not so much that they will be taking legal action against you (despite what they claim), but that they will be threatening your new employer, either legally, or business-wise. If the threats against your new employer are strong enough, your new employer may rescind your employment offer. They are either ...


8

The important thing is to understand why that group of employees left. Are there systemic issues in your company that you haven’t seen yet? Did they suffer some injustice from the company? Did they get picked off to join another company? Did they all have new jobs lined up? If you uncover problems at your company while thinking about these questions, ...


7

Canada Specific Answer If you want to be eligible for EI benefits while looking for your next job, you must meet these criteria (emphasis mine): were employed in insurable employment lost your job through no fault of your own are affected by flooding or wildfires have been without work and without pay for at least seven consecutive days in the last 52 weeks ...


6

What do you recommend I should do/say? Do nothing for now. If/when HR asks you to pay back some or all of the cost of your benefits due to breaking your contract, you can either just pay it or talk to your lawyer and see if there is an alternative. Then, if you haven't saved the money required, ask about a repayment plan. In my experience, these contract ...


6

If they insist so much to find out who is the new employer probably they want to contact one of their managers and start a discussion on the style don't dare to hire one of my employees any more. This things often end up amicably, but they could also get nasty, nobody will ever tell anything to you about it, but the mood around you might change, so you ...


6

May my boss legally forbid me from telling anyone goodbye before I leave the company? No. You have already resigned. The worst that they could do should you disobey their request is to terminate you before your notice period is up. She repeated firmly that the company lets people know if I am leaving and I do not. That's what they would like, but in ...


6

It's been 2 months. Time to finalize it with a certified mail and outline the conditions: 1: Please send the return box or confirmation thereof (receipt or tracking number) within 2 weeks. (Or whatever time you want to wait, could be less.) 2: Failure to do so within the timeframe will deem the equipment as forfeit. The hard drive will be removed and ...


5

Do as they say. Once you have left and they have paid your final salary, then update linkedin and email all your friends / colleagues as you wish.


5

On a practical level, you could tell close colleagues on the understanding that they keep it to themselves. It sounds like they are worried about you emailing everyone and letting the whole office know. So don't. Keep it discreet until you leave. It's very hard to keep this kind of thing totally secret. If you're friends with any colleagues outside work, it'...


5

Linked-In is good for people that look for new jobs and side opportunities There is no real reason to update it otherwise. As for your current situation, you are doing everything right, do not sign anything and do not disclose ANY extraneous information. I assume, if you being bashed in to a non compete signing , you have none or not-enforceable in your ...


5

Once you start the new job you won't be able to keep it a secret for ever! The question isn't whether you can keep the old company in ignorance, it's whether their non-compete argument has any validity. From what you tell us, they seem to be acting quite unreasonably. But, with respect, that's quite normal when we only hear YOUR side of the argument! You ...


4

We can't answer "what should you do" because it depends on factors you know that we don't, such as your career goals, your income aspirations and job satisfaction, etc. (As a side note, this makes these kinds of questions off-topic here, hence the downvotes you've gotten already.) However, in making this decision I'd advise you to consider the ...


4

You don't need to worry about this. Many companies will not even seek references. Of those that do, most will have already made the decision to hire you and will collect references as a final check. Your experience and competence as a team leader will be determined at interview, not by asking a previous employer. If / when they are asked for a reference, ...


4

So to be honest I'm not really going to respond directly to your question "How to decline the Tech Lead position" but instead talk about why you don't want the position. First part is, do you want to be a Tech Lead or not? That is the first question that you need to ask yourself, because for me it's not the type of project that decides that, it's ...


3

Unless this employer is very unreasonable, this shouldn't burn a bridge. You're still in your probation period so no promises have been made on either side. Also feel pretty bad about having a gap on my resume now. You don't have to leave this job off of your resume unless you believe that this employer will give you a negative reference during background ...


3

Depending on your location, I would suggest sending the email stating that due to box hasn`t arrived yet, equipment will be sent COD to the office address on the date (in a week) And actually do so Keep all the communication`s promises and tracking number to the shipment


3

Why not just post it back to them with registered delivery? Or, Pop around the office and hand it in


2

There are people who work slowly, and their code works. There are others who are a lot faster, and then when QA tests their code it fails, a bug report is produced, someone wastes their time by finding and fixing the bug, then more problems are found, and in the end twice as much time is spent because of the "fast" software developer. Guess who I ...


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