113

Should I tell him I'll quit or just do it without giving an explanation? Don't bother. Threatening to quit is extremely unlikely to cause the company to abandon the fingerprint scanner. And you were thinking of quitting anyway. Finally, you indicated that you don't want to get into a discussion about the issue anyway. Just find a new job, give your notice, ...


99

For your case, don't bother. Better to leave on good terms and get a reference. It sounds like it's not a good place to work, and you're better off finding a better job. As an aside: Nighfillers at a retail store I worked took exception to a finger print scanner. They tried all sorts of ways to get it removed, including complaining that it was sticky and ...


81

The blow will be bad, no matter what you do, but there are some things you can do to minimise it: Do it sooner rather than later Management is working hard on a plan for the future. Right now, that plan includes you. They might be thinking up new structures, where you play a specific role. Knowing as soon as possible that you won’t be around will save them ...


75

I'm legally obligated to provide 3 weeks of severance. Then it seems to me that the answer is clear: give your 3 week notice, serve it, get paid and leave, take good use of that time to recover from burnout and then start your new job with a fresh mindset and energy. To my point of view, framing this situation so they fire you in order to get more money ...


27

I'd say this solution is a hybrid of my interpretation of the advice from @DarkCyprus and a kind redditor. So, today was rough, but more-or-less rewarding. I received yet another demand to sign the paperwork that would put more responsibility on me (and the vaguely-worded promise of the "opportunity/ability" to earn more money), and increase the ...


21

I very much disagree with the general tone of the top answers here which essentially amount to "give up and look for a new job". While I agree with this being the right approach if the company is adamant about its position and so are you about yours; I would still suggest first talking to them. Not to threaten resigning over this, or to coerce them ...


15

No, just give your notice once you have a job. I think organizations would gain enormously if they welcomed people telling them that they were planning to leave. The knowledge losses are enormous from it. But you have to protect yourself. Your boss might fire you if he thinks you are disloyal. And you probably could use the income and it is much easier to ...


14

Is there any possibility that your manager might make accommodation for you? Just say that you're not comfortable using the machine and you would prefer to track your hours in a different fashion. He might agree. I understand that some areas are more hostile to employees than other areas, but I've personally never worked with an employer who would not ...


12

I'm seeing a very similar situation whereby employees are switching employer to those that have coped better, and more professionally, with the current economic situation. If your employer had better understood business needs, who were the competent employees, and more importantly how they were feeling they'd have made a better job of it. Besides, with a '...


11

For starters, you are always better being dismissed/let go/fired by your employer in terms of the amount of compensation you will be paid in Ontario. As an employee in Ontario, you are not required to give any notice to your employer, unless you have it as part of your contract. You stated your contract requires 3 weeks notice. When an employer in Ontario ...


8

What to do? Mum should be working with a mental health professional. They would help her overcome her mental fatigue, psychological stress, and overly emotional reaction. They would also teach her some more effective coping strategies and how to better deal with negative feedback. She should not seek a demotion. She should learn whatever legal remedies ...


8

Should I tell my boss or colleagues that I will leave the company? No. Do your job search interview and wait until you have an offer in hand that you are ready to sign. Make sure that factor in your legally required notice time into negotiating the start date of your new job. Maybe you also want to do a few weeks of in-between down time, if you can afford ...


6

You should check the legal position. If it's not legal then you can simply refuse to use it and they can't fire you for it. There is also the Health and Safety aspect to consider, if it's not safe (especially with coronavirus) there could be an issue there. If it is legal then it is probably best to just look for another job. It's rarely worth trying to &...


5

Since I already know that I will leave as soon as I find a suitable job, this might become a problem. It would make more sense to transfer this project to someone who stays in the company. Frankly, I think you are overestimating how crucial you are to this project. Your managers never took it for granted that you are always available and if they thought it ...


4

This very much depends on how company A sees you. As a consultant developer myself, there are vast differences in how a client treats me. Either they treat me like one of their employees, or they treat me as a faceless "company B developer" consultant. How they will respond to your leaving depends massively on both their general attitude towards ...


4

When I give 2-weeks notice to my manager, and when I'm talking to my coworkers who will be very upset that I'm leaving, is there anything I can do to cushion the blow? You can offer some of your colleagues to ask at your new place if they are looking for more people, though you will want to do that off current employers property, time and comms. Besides ...


4

I can't think why thay would ever give you 8 months pay if you have already given 2 months notice. If they decide that you are becoming a niusance, they could send you on "gardening leave" for whatever remains of the two months - effectively keeping you on the payroll but telling you that you that don't have to do any work for them. Alternatively, ...


4

I assume you are not essential for the company in one way or another. The better strategy is to involve your coleagues. A lot of them. Failing that, you can get nothing by opposing a management decision some levels up.


3

Putting a bit of a different spin, but probably pulling multiple answers together. You're not crazy for not wanting to go through this added measure. Your approach to your information privacy (as as sanitation concerns) is your personal decision. The world of digital scans and data retention is too new and too fast-evolving for most of the big ...


3

You can quit, but it might become a "stain" on your resume depending on what happens afterwards, and what investigations are done. As seen in this article it's legal provided they install a system with appropriate measures. They may have to provide that other methods have been ineffective, but for most employers, it will be trivial to make up an ...


3

Don't needlessly limit yourself. Three reasons I say this: "job offer which is so good that I can't turn it down" "I'm aware that my manager, the leadership team, and my coworkers all consider me a top performing employee." Over the last 2 months, many of the top performing employees have left my current company. In other words, your ...


3

I'm taking Glorfindel's advice and requesting the accounts be merged. To provide a rough summary: My new job starts in 8 weeks from now. I was burned out, and asked my new employer to give me 8 weeks before I start. My original plan was to wait 4 weeks and continue working at my current employer, and then provide 3 weeks of notice to my current employer, ...


2

According to your description, it seems that there is a conflict between your mum's expectations regarding doing things, and the new employee's way of doing things. I know this kind of conflict from my own experience, both in the professional life, and in the private life. In time, at the cost of pretty much destroying my health, I learned that as long as ...


2

You can't decide what will be the Company A's reaction. If they decide to blame you, so be it, there is nothing you can do. However, what you can do is respect the strict rules of the procedure. Usually, the first person to talk to is your direct superior from Company B. Do it as soon as possible so both companies have time to work it out. He will then talk ...


2

Don't sign anything and just leave after your initial notice period. This whole situation sounds dangerous and toxic, just get out and forget about the whole thing. You're burned out and underpaid, and you have a new job ready to go. Just try to wrap things up and move on with your life. Don't try any complex maneuvers that could get you further enmeshed ...


2

Gnat already linked you to a very relevant question you should read and consider (How can I push back against my manager and HR trying to extend my relieving date?). My two cents on your situation, given that you need the relieving letter to start a new job: (from your comments): But I am getting no official response. This has become a deadlock. Since I ...


1

Don't worry about it. Business is business. If the company was going underwater, do you think they would give a second thought to terminating you? If you do, you're naive and you need to snap out of it, because the answer is a thorough and resounding NO. And thus, you should treat them with the exact same amount of respect they treat you, which is none. ...


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