34

You should discuss your concerns with your direct manager asap. Only they can help to clarify your obligations to the project and also help you fill the gaps you need to complete the project. Be sure to do it as soon as possible because this leaves more room to make changes for everyone. And try not to stress too much. Project delays happen all the time due ...


15

You leave when your contract ends. If the publication is not finished, then the company can offer to employ you for another month, but they can't force you. If you don't agree, or they don't offer an extension of the contract, someone else will have to finish the publication. In many places working for free is illegal. Which means even if you offered working ...


15

I'd like to ask here if there are any general rules The general rule is to just delete your personal data and don't touch what belongs to the company. Depending on what is on the device a factory reset can cause extra work for the IT. Things like apps, update and licences may need to be rebuilt. The other general rule is that if you're going to modify ...


13

If you want to get advice specific to your situation, the Citizen's Advice Bureau would be the place to go in the UK. Broadly speaking, the fact that an employment contract refers to a non-existent employee handbook in one section has no impact on other sections. If there is a section in the employment contract that talks about the dress code and refers to ...


12

Notice is a concept which applies only to indefinite contracts (or potentially if you want to end a fixed term contract before its defined expiration date). Everybody should be aware of the end date and, barring any extension to the contract, knows you're going to leave then. That said, sometimes things get forgotten. You wouldn't do yourself any harm to say ...


10

It really depends on everything. The actual meme, the person that's leaving, and the remaining colleagues. In the first meme, if the person was actually reprimanded for theft, that's just the dumbest thing to say on the last day. However, if the guy is known to be a real stickler for not stealing supplies, then it might work, depending on their colleagues. ...


10

In the UK, by law you have to give one week notice if you worked with the employer for up to two years, after two years it increases by one week for every year. If you have a contract, the notice period for both sides is usually longer. If you haven't been given a contract yet, the notice period by law would apply, so one week. If you want to leave and they ...


8

Another way to phrase this question would be: can I delete all the company data on the company-owned devices that I've been using? Unless you get written confirmation that it is OK to do this, I would strongly advise against it, because you could potentially be destroying company records and data. You wouldn't just decide to shred all of the documents and ...


7

Have you considered thanking the CEO for his consideration and informing him that you would love to work with him again in the future? If you stay in touch, you can always return a few years after the reorganization. If you are remembered well, you'll have a much better bargaining position. I suspect that you feel conflicted about leaving, because you had ...


6

If they don't want to secure your services with a new contract, that's on them. Personally, I would remind them that the contract is ending, but that's just me. If they do offer you a new contract, talk about ending the Work From Home policy, negotiating some vacation time, and increasing your rates. Since you don't really want the job, it will be easy for ...


5

Yes you can stay. If your current employer agrees, you can withdraw your notice and continue your employment. Your new company will be disappointed when you inform them you will not be starting with them after all. They'll only be disappointed though, not angry; candidates sometimes accept counter-offers so they'll understand your position. You should be ...


4

Absent further information, it sounds like your contract is for "time", rather than "work product", i.e. you are available for a fixed amount of time. In which case, yes it's fine to leave when the contract is finished and without giving notice. You're right to be concerned about them being angry the project is unfinished, but the worst ...


4

Not using Company machines for personal data is by far the best option. However you did, so now you have to check with IT before you do a reset. If you reset then they may, or may not bother, be able to recover costs from you to rebuild the device. If they completely reset devices as part of their standard policy when re-issuing devices then it won't be an ...


4

While career advice is not encouraged on this site, I can give my perspective. If they valued you, they should value you when you were staying. Now they are only trying to reduce attrition which will look bad on them. Even if you stay, there will be unspoken tension that you got your promotion as an attempt to hold you back and they may try to compensate at ...


4

Read the room Personally, I'd never send an email containing a meme. I expect my son wouldn't see a problem with it. I'd say it's "advisable" to share a meme if you know it will be received in the way you intended, and for no other reason. You never know when you will encounter someone in the future who worked at an old company you also worked for, ...


3

The fact that you've technically signed CompanyY and worked there one week is of imperceptibly small importance. Really this situation should be framed as a "Which job offer do I choose between X and Y?" question. CompanyX - Offers mentorship, good rapport, a project you can feel ownership in (considering you already do), more choice/control over ...


3

Depending on the exact contents of what you send, you could be opening yourself up to a world of hurt doing something like this. Take your third image for example. What exactly are you trying to imply with it? Because it would be very easy to read that as saying that you've sabotaged something, or failed to do proper handover, and you're expecting the place ...


3

Generally speaking: If you would include such a thing in a regular email if this was not your last day, go ahead. Your last day doesn't make it special. But if you wouldn't and you just consider it because it's you last day? Don't. Your last day doesn't make it special. It's the last day. So it's still a day at work. Be professional to the normal standards ...


3

No Unless for some reason you happen to be fourteen and the company you're leaving happens to be exclusively staffed by other fourteen year-olds. Rubbish like this from fourteen year olds is not any better of course - it's just people will accept that they perhaps don't know any better and will cut them some slack. The content of all the given examples ...


2

In the absence of an electronic media usage policy, and as your contract does not state otherwise, I would say you did nothing prohibited, provided you took steps to save company data. If there is one, you should follow it, since it is supposed to regulate these matters. I would still explain the situation to the manager/IT department. A factory reset to ...


2

You're asking a couple of questions at the same time. Should you stick with this company? Should I start working for a startup? As for quitting: you can just go, your manager/recruiter won't be happy but they haven't invested much in you. I don't think I would mention working somewhere less than a month on my resume so there's no risk for your future job ...


1

You're approaching your risk profile backwards. At the start of your career, it's much easier to go out on a limb and try new things. If it backfires, you haven't shot yourself in the foot too much. If it doesn't, you've gotten an opportunity to learn new technologies in a startup environment which will teach you way more than working for a bloated company. ...


1

I do notice a slight culture shift in how workplace conduct generally occur. At my current employer, using meme seems to be common practice since in MS teams you can post the meme. However, I would be careful about what sort of meme you use. In the sample you gave the first one about stealing office supplies and the last one about burning the place down ...


1

The key principle here is to BE PROFESSIONAL as you leave. That means you don't send such memes or ranting emails or anything of that nature. Don't even send a blast email because most people at the company don't care that you're leaving and probably don't even know you. If you have had a close working relationship with a few coworkers, you might send a ...


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