43

After notifying my manager, I was then asked to write a letter of resignation with my final date as contract end to finish off the process. Ignore that strange request. You can not "resign" from that company any more than I can: you're not an employee. Send a polite email simply reminding everyone that the contract is finished. Dear Steve and ...


19

If your manager really just asked, as in "Hey CookieExchange, would you mind putting together an email that covers what you just told me verbally?" that seems eminently reasonable. Your manager, presumably, needs to let HR and his manager know that they need to start looking to replace you after your contract ends. Having an email from you ...


12

Of course you tell your manager. Your manager needs to know about this. Remember that hiring you didn’t come for free, it cost your company significant money, which they will lose if you leave. Don’t worry about how money is moving, that’s something your managers manager and her manager will be worrying about. If the whole project is found at risk, you want ...


10

"Written" includes emails, so that should be perfectly valid. What you can't do is call him say "I quit" and then leave. There needs to be a paper trail (although these days this is digital mainly) that the resignation came from you and not hearsay. However, it's probably worth calling your boss first and talking things over before the ...


8

Talk to your manager before writing a formal letter. There's a pretty good chance they'll agree to an immediate exit since they won't want to waste two weeks' salary for you to twiddle your thumbs, especially since you've only been there a week. If you have started some work/task, be prepared to be asked to stay a short time to complete it. I once had a ...


6

It sounds like you are working with a consulting company and the project leader had expected a domain expert in the topic to be assigned for the role which you are filling. Many clients have unrealistic expectations from consulting companies. That's not necessarily an intractable problem and it definitely is not your fault. It's worth an effort to try to ...


6

You won't lose your vacation days. You must take your required minimal number of yearly vacation days within 6 months (so, before July 1), which, for a 40 hour/week contract is 20 vacation days. (For vacation days above legal, it depends on the company; for the company I work for, that's 5 years). But that's irrelevant for your case, as you're leaving before ...


6

I can't see any harm in doing both. Send the email and then drop in a hard copy "for filing purposes", or something along those lines.


5

Disclaimer: I am not a resident of California, nor am I a lawyer, but I have read some contracts from California-based companies, so I have a reasonable understanding of the standard "at-will" employment system. My understanding is that California is an "at-will employment" state. What this means is that the employer is allowed to fire ...


4

Please suggest me how I can leave gracefully. If you want to leave on as good terms as possible, then just quietly leave when you have found a new position and thank everyone for the learning experience. There is no upside to taking a swing at anyone on your way out. And it's a small World, making enemies is not worth it. Your background is unsuited for the ...


4

It shouldn't, sometimes jobs just don't work out. In your case your previous two jobs spanned years rather than months. It won't be thought of as job hopping because it's not a trend, it's just a single instance. If it's affecting you mentally, then it's best to move on if you cannot resolve the issues in situ. The one place where you may have an issue is ...


3

He hates paper, so what? You're leaving soon anyway. But I would make sure my boss does not have to learn by email or written note that I was leaving. Before sending any formal notification, tell your boss face-to-face you are leaving. Inform at HR what the formal procedure is when resigning, and follow that. If they're ok with an email, send an email. If ...


3

Is the company allowed to deny my use of those holidays during the leaving period? No. See for example: https://www.legalexpatdesk.nl/holidays/ However that doesn't mean they won't try anyway and the key question for you is "What to do if they deny it ". Read through your employee handbook and your corporate policies. Make sure you understand all ...


3

First off, do not react too quickly. Think things through. In many jurisdictions, you don't get unemployment benefits when you resign. I don't know if this is a factor for you, and it may not be, but I'm calling attention to that detail in case you had not considered it. Second, tell your manager what happened. Your manager sounds pretty good. And you're a ...


1

Look over your original contract very carefully. Consider ways that they may try to screw you over. Then consider whether or not you should send them a reminder letter. Or, ask them to give you a reminder letter that your contract is ending (which would make much more sense under the circumstances).


1

You can send him a pdf file via email. You can both sign it digitally and he'll be able to print it if he needs a paper version.


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