170

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


95

If he didn't offer you compensation, you do not have a normal professional relationship. You have been cheated of three days of pay. Your company evidently is not careful about making accusations if they can badly pull a report and not be bothered to check that they generated it correctly before they put you on suspension. That is a bad sign. Apologies are ...


59

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


24

Notice period is calculated in calendar days (not working days) so the weekend is included, the notice period begins the day after you give notice (not the same day) so if you gave notice on the 15th of then the first day of your notice period is actually the 16th making the last day of your notice period the 15th of December i.e. your last day of employment ...


21

Other answers are generally correct in the advice of getting any promises in writing, but are glossing over a really important fact for your situation: You resigned without having another job lined up. That really puts you in a tough situation that is going to be difficult to remedy. While you can't trust any promise of a raise or more responsibility by ...


15

Short answer: You can fight, and probably win compensation for the time lost, but it may not be worth it. Longer answer: In all practical terms, it will likely cost you more to fight for it. Ask politely for the money, as the suspension was not justified. If you get it, great, if not, I recommend you just move on to the new job you've accepted. The ...


15

Diplomacy frequently consists in soothingly saying, “Nice doggie,” until you have a chance to pick up a rock. —Walter Trumball. Right now, they're saying "nice doggy". As soon as you agree, they'll look for that rock. Every last career adviser, myself included, will warn you about accepting a counter offer. The simple reason is that you have proven that ...


13

From the comments: "Frankly, I don't wanna join this startup at all! The ONLY reason I want their offer is so I can use it as leverage to drive up my compensation in other companies. So I need a safe way of accepting their offer (without signing anything), that I can later turn down." This is an important piece of context that should have been in ...


11

You have an offer for a new job. If that offer is better than your old job, then figure out what your notice period is, and accept the offer. With that done, you have the choice: a. Go to your old company and give notice. b. Go to your old company and ask for payment for these three days. If they don’t pay you give notice. If they pay, you put the money in ...


9

This is a point of negotiation. Convey to your boss today in writing, “I am very concerned I’m going to lose my vacation payout. Please tell me in writing I will be classified as a CA employee at the end of my notice or I will be forced to move my last day up into 2019. I really want to finish knowledge transfer and help the company through the ...


6

I’m adding a separate answer because most of the answers are speaking to normal negotiation situations and not yours. From your posts, you’re willing and able to be jobless vs. do a job you don’t want to do. So it seems this isn’t about this company paying you more now or possessing leverage over them. Similarly, the usual points about them wanting to ...


6

Analyse your situation to the best ofyour capability! Under what conditions would you be willing to stay? What has to change? What's your way forward after the temp position? Would you have to go back? Could you go into another position? That is, get yourself clear on your constraints. Then, analyse your manager and your company: - Does your manager gain ...


6

You asked, Would it be super innapropriate for me to ask for some sort of (modest) payment (similar to a severance) as consideration for signing a separation agreement, even though I'm quitting? I don't know if inappropriate is really the right word, but I'm having a hard time understanding how a payment to you makes any sense, in terms of how you would ...


5

When I see someone with unusual work history my first question always is "why did you leave X, Y, and Z" and then let the candidate tell me a story. Ideally, this story will outline why they've joined each of those companies, what happened after joining that made them consider leaving, and if what steps they've taken to try to resolve it internally. If they ...


5

You should ask for compensation for that unwarranted suspension period. Placing someone on unpaid suspension for a suspected error may or may not be legal or allowed by your contract or local employment laws. If they choose not to pay you, you may want to contact an employment lawyer to see if they are required to pay you. Regardless of if they pay you or ...


4

That offer is worth the paper he printed it on... If he was serious then it would have been on paper. He is already delaying a raise until May.. And when you get to May the next excuse will be “the current economic situation” or “a customer downturn”. Look for the next post and good luck.


4

I would recommend talking with an employment lawyer to get professional advice before making a decision on how to proceed. In my experience being bonded to a role tends to be linked to receiving some sort of unusual benefit, for example the company funds expensive training etc. In other words if you leave early you have to pay back the training cost. But it'...


4

I am reading your other question and I believe you currently do not have a job lined up. So your hypothetical pay bump is only that, an assumption that may not materialize anytime soon. I think you should not have quit and instead stayed on board without having said anything at all. During this time you look for a job that lines up with what you expect. ...


4

Seems like you are mentally checked out from the company and moved on, which is even more reasons to have that discussion with your current boss. Explain that you just want to move on, asap, and ask how this can be facilitated. Usually, that means compiling a list of things that need to be delivered, and after that, the company can just let you go. In the ...


4

You are in a sticky situation. IF your employer transitioned your place of employment, which they should have, then you are now governed under those states laws. However, if the company has most of their people in CA their 'policy' may be to pay out vacation now matter where you live. Remote workers provide interesting problems for companies, especially ...


2

You're on a visible high-stakes project now. Yes, it's unpleasant: it's a lonely slog through a tech-debt swamp. You've asked for help and gotten it, but your helper hasn't yet come on board fully. It's obviously frustrating. With respect, this kind of ugly project reflects the real world of software engineering. May I suggest you treat it as a career ...


2

Check with your employer, but almost certainly Friday.


2

According to him I could get a 40-50% hike in my next job, but he asked me to an analysis and see if that is what I want. According to me the current organization cannot give me that hike, the next appraisal cycle is in May. He says that I am sincere and it should pay off in the current organization. If it were a 10% hike, I could see the ...


2

If the separation agreement is overly broad, delay indefinitely. Thanks. I'm going to have my lawyer review it. At the very least, this gives you time to sleep on it and show the paperwork to others. If they press you on a due-by-sign date, just say that you're getting free legal advice from a friend and you don't want to rush him. And if/when you do ...


2

is there any incentive for me to actually sign? The only potential incentive is some sort of reference for the future. But usually it is HR that asks you to sign such documents, not your supervisor or coworkers whom you would likely use as references down the line. Personally, I have never signed any exit papers as they are written for the benefit of the ...


1

Two jobs in short time after graduation is (in my experience) not bad enough to remove your CV alltogether. Even if it was, leaving the jobs alltogether from your CV would be worse. In an interview, you should be ready to tell a convincing story why you left the jobs (without blaming the other companies too much). Having "problems" in a job is a situation ...


1

You are willing to leave your job for a 40% raise, and your boss is giving you unsubstantiated promises about the possibility of a raise and wants you to talk to the CTO. Sounds like your boss has no leverage and is desperately wanting to keep you around, but has nothing to offer. If a valued employee of mine was leaving, I would come to him with paperwork ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible