174

It's hard to deal with constant manipulation. Two weeks of this nonsense will surely be a challenge. It may be tempting to sabotage, lash out, not show up for work, or otherwise try to avoid the problem or strike back. But do your best to be the professional one in this scenario, and keep the following guidelines in mind: Disengage and de-escalate. Do your ...


140

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? No. Slavery time is over, and if a company does not want to lose you, they are free to rectify whatever bothers you to convince you to stay. But you certainly are free to resign from a job whenever you please, and given the 3 months notice period, there is no way for it to constitute an "...


53

First and foremost, it's always okay to quit. Ultimately, unless you're doing something that breaks a contract or other specific legal agreement, employers know that people can leave at any time for just about any reason, and planning for your departure is ultimately their problem, not yours. Of course, it's commendable that you are concerned about your work,...


53

Last week, I was discussing with some friends at work how a new hire, "Francis", who has only been with the company 12 weeks, got promoted to the research team, and mentioned that he got the job "probably because of white privilege". Saying someone got a job based on their race regardlessly being majority or minority is unprofessional and could be cause ...


47

Don't be unprofessional and potentially compromise a reference. If he does pull you aside, then simply restate your position clearly and politely: I have given you my notice and am leaving on X date. I am not going to reconsider, so please do not ask me again. ... and repeat as necessary. It works just as well if other people are dragged in; don't ...


36

Other than blowing up a managerial reference, is there any consequence to just never being heard from again? Your professional reputation will be damaged in the eyes of anyone who knows what you did. In my part of the world, in my work domain, it can be a "small world". Word gets around. Others learn what kind of professional you are. I value my ...


33

It's not unprofessional to take sick time, because you are becoming ill because of this situation. This is causing you harm and you need to be healthy and fit for your future role. You need to get this out if your mind as dwelling on it further will be harmful, find distractions to take your mind away from this. An element of professionalism is being self ...


32

It's perfectly reasonable to say to someone "Sorry to hear you're leaving. What's next for you?" in an appropriate environment, like a private personal conversation. They might not want to answer, or they might not know what's next. If they don't have something lined up and if this is someone you'd be willing to recommend (and it sounds from your post ...


27

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? For your resignation to qualify being abusive your employer must prove harmful intent. In theory quitting in the middle of a key project for the company could qualify (source here) but only if they can prove it was your intent that they present an unfinished project. A 3 months notice is ...


26

If I refuse to write the apology, I'll be fired for harassment/racism, with cause (no severance). Actually, the reverse may happen. If you give them an apology letter, that may give them the paperwork they need to fire you for cause (and no severance). Do not trust what they tell you. Seek your own legal advice. Do not trust theirs. After all, do they ...


24

If you have been hired to lead a team and then the whole team gets fired and not replaced, that sounds like a pretty valid reason to leave. You could not fulfill the role you were hired for without a team, after all.


22

The other answers raise good points, many of which I agree with, but I'll offer a counter-position which I think is worth considering I have no intents to burn bridges or harm my employer. Frankly, there's a high risk you'll do both here. Not just that, but if you quit now, you won't have delivered this important project. Yes, you're being paid day to ...


19

Well, the obvious (to me) answer is: You're proving that they were right not to promote you. You will have shown that you were not dependable. Call the company that made you the offer first thing Tuesday, get everything set and SIGNED, then put in your two weeks. That's not such a high price to maintain your reputation.


18

You can, but bear in mind they might not want to tell you. I'd say something along the lines of: Hey. Sorry to hear you're leaving, I'm sure you'll be missed. It took me by surprise when you told me earlier, do you mind me asking why? Completely understand if you don't want to share, I was just curious. Obviously change the wording depending on how ...


14

Last week, I was discussing with some friends at work how a new hire, "Francis", who has only been with the company 12 weeks, got promoted to the research team, and mentioned that he got the job "probably because of white privilege" Firstly, one of your "friends" is not your friend if it got back to HR. I tried to explain that I meant that a portion of ...


12

There is nothing wrong with leaving a job. At the end of the day we all have to do what's best for ourselves. Finding a replacement is your employers' problem, not yours.


11

Preface: I'm a white guy. I believe in white privilege, as the data are quite clear on it. In fact I suspect some part of my success (such as it is) is a result of it. Also my being male, and being tall, and not being ugly. All of those things (in roughly that order of impact) have been proven to give one a professional boost in U.S. society (and others). ...


9

First of all, you didn't resign with the intent of hurting either your company or your boss. Obviously no one can hold you responsible for this. I don't think leaving just before a deadline is a case of abusive resignation, your boss should be the one to always be ready for someone leaving, even in a small company. If you don't have interest anymore, you ...


9

You should have checked your contract before agreeing to pay for the notice period. Assuming you're in India, the contracts usually have a condition that either party (you or the organization) can pay the amount equivalent to the notice period salary in lieu of actually serving (resignation) / allowing to serve (termination) the notice period. However, ...


8

So my question is, would it be a huge ethical issue to accept such an offer? Would it even be worth it? Legally, it depends if there is an exclusive clause in your contract between you and your employer, the contract between your customer and your employer and the intention of every party. If a party feel it is not ethical, have serious intention and is ...


8

You are burning bridges, but you are burning bridges for no good reason whatsoever and with really bad timing. Don’t act until you have a signed, legally binding contract with another company, and then you give your notice. It’s just about possible that the new company won’t want you anymore when they hear how you left. Or that someone really wants you to ...


8

It’s absolutely a good reason to leave. The company must have known the situation before they hired you. So nobody can blame you. But your question is whether you should leave. To decide that , look at the job as it is. Ignore the embarrassment. The embarrassment isn’t yours, it’s your employer’s. How is the pay, how is the work, is it stressful, do people ...


7

First. Never ghost your employer like this. It will end up haunting you in the end. (See what I did there :D) But joking aside you really do not want to hit the self destruct button on this one. Seeing that you already have an offer I would simply accept that offer and give your 2 weeks. Do not slack off or refuse to perform during those 2 weeks and simply ...


6

Given that you applied for and were offered a job leading a team of two people, I'm assuming that you have either previously been working in a managerial/leadership role, or you were intending to move your career in that direction? If that is the case, then spending these last nine months not leading a team is either a backwards step, or at best, a lack of ...


5

At the end of the day, every employer should have contingency plans in place. If you want to quit, just give your regular notice and do the regular handover you would do at any other company. With regards to your project, just make sure everything is documented, documented, and documented. Your employer can't hold you hostage just because his project has ...


5

This is normal. In the modern business environment, there are a lot of strategic reasons to have various business entities instead of one big one. Taxation, the ability to fund them differently, fold or sell them off separately, qualify for country specific grants and benefits, and so on. Hell I work for a 10 person company and we have at least 3 and ...


5

Even if the company manages to hire a new developer to replace me before the exhibition, it is highly unlikely that the v2 will be ready in June. This is sometimes called having a "bus number" of one. This refers to the rather macabre calculation of the smallest number of employees who would seriously threaten the project or even the company if they were ...


5

This strikes me as the kind of question where if you have to ask, you probably know the answer. Let me illustrate: I've had a coworker who I knew pretty well walk up and tell me that tomorrow was their last day. I gasped, and reflexively asked what happened. We ended up getting lunch that day and spending the whole lunch our wading through the gory details ...


3

When you give notice with a notice period, there are two possibilities: Either the company has to accept the notice, due to the laws of your country and your contract. Then everything is clear, you leave after two weeks. Or you gave a shorter notice. In that case, the company has two choices: Reject your notice (say you gave two weeks but you are ...


3

There is one way you can be professional and still leave in less than two weeks. The next time your boss pressures you, let him know that the pressure is becoming a problem, and you will be willing to leave earlier if it continues. Boss, you keep pressuring me, and I'm not going to change my mind about leaving. I will, however, be willing to leave ...


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