225

It's only been 2 weeks... I'd argue that you don't have to mention this job at all. When asked why you're job searching you can explain why you left your previous position. If for any reason you can't omit a job from your work history no matter how short (locale, the type of job you're applying for, etc.), you can be honest without going into details: I'm ...


183

Go online and change all the passwords now for your personal accounts. Obviously the OP no longer has access to the work machine, so this means either using a machine at home or even going to an internet cafe or equivalent to log in to all accounts as necessary and change passwords. Work associated accounts like work email they will be able to, and have ...


163

Would you want a co-worker to alert management if they suspected you were leaving? The problem here is that you could really damage someone's career by precipitating his termination before he finds another job. Sadly, the job market is extremely harsh and "red-flags" any candidate who happens to be unemployed. It's just work, let it go, what's the worst ...


135

Specifically Gmail you can log out remotely: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/8154 Sign out from another computer If you forgot to sign out of your email on another computer, you can remotely sign out of Gmail. Open Gmail. In the bottom right corner, click Details and then Sign out all other web sessions. Tip: If you’re using a public or ...


121

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


121

Your best bet isn't to put a limit on how many times they can call you, it's to simply say that you are now unable to take calls during the day while you're at work. Invite them to email you if they have problems, and you may take a look when you get home, in your personal time. Say that you're unable to answer queries while you're at your new job. Dropping ...


109

None of what you've stated is empirical evidence that Bob is planning on leaving. Additionally, none of this is your business. Should you inform the future PO that Bob may be leaving soon? No.


93

Normal is no support at all. Every document or knowledge you could have should have been handed when you were under contract. After this it's not your problem anymore and should have been your ex-manager's before you left. Once or twice can be understood but doesn't mean it should be acceptable. By answering you're training them to keep calling you. You ...


50

If you're using Chrome and you've logged in with your gmail, you might be able to log out of all other browsers through the browser settings. Go to your Google synched account from the top right, and then go to Account Security. From there you can log out of all other devices. Then change your passwords immediately, or use a password manager addon to do it ...


38

About an year ago, Bob requested to be transferred to our team because he was bored and did not like what he was doing. He was promised to be transferred in a few months, but a year has passed and nothing really changed. This is the only thing you are sure of: For a year Bob has wanted to switch jobs, he was promised a switch, but nothing happened. ...


33

I accepted the offer but I feel guilty since the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech. How should I tell my boss? There is no need to explain yourself or to feel guilty. It's your life and ultimately you have to look out for yourself and work in a place you get paid well and are comfortable. You just hand your notice period, serve it, and ...


31

You have absolutely no obligation towards your previous employer, who isn’t paying you. You might tell them “I’d love to help you, but not for free. I think X per hour would be appropriate. Where can I send the bill?” 80% chance it turns out they didn’t really need you. 20% chance it puts some cash in your pocket. Make sure you ask your current employer ...


30

Honestly, I think you're asking the wrong question entirely. If Bob's work and knowledge are valued in the company at all, you need to look at the bigger picture and not just in the context of your team. Bob was promised a transfer, the company failed to deliver. Perhaps his patience is exhausted and he's looking to move to another company that follows ...


25

Be Careful In a broad sense just means that you need to choose your actions and your words very carefully from here on in, because senior management is now aware of you. Your manager is a bit lost to know what to do, which given the situation, is somewhat understandable. So the best they can offer you is a bit of a vague warning. If you know of specific ...


24

Hi {Previous Boss}, It has been a pleasure to work for you and I would be happy to help with what you are asking about but unfortunately these requests are consuming more and more of my free time. If you would like then we can set up a time to meet and discuss an appropriate rate for continued consulting services. Best regards, Jean-Pierre If ...


21

I have been in a similar situation quite a few years ago. I lasted 4 months with company X before I reached tipping point and called short on my probation. A few years later I was looking to switch jobs again (not out of choice this time) and the recruitment agent that was contracted by company Y insisted that my 4 month tenure with X looked bad on my CV ...


20

The browsers remember almost all of my personal passwords in future, do not do that. And only ever use private mode browsing at work, so as not to leave a history. Personally, I only ever visit Stack Overflow on my work PC, in private mode, and check my email at lunchtime on my 'phone. Doing otherwise might get you sacked at some places (and using ...


18

"...the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech..." You have already spent much time and energy trying to assure that <the company I'm employed with> will continue to have a tech. Unfortunately <the company I'm employed with> refuses to coöperate. If your employer wants to have a tech working for them, it is their responsibility ...


14

Short answer: You don't. It's not your problem and certainly not one of your making. Simply put, replacing you and your skillset is the responsibility of the organisation, not yours. If they haven't taken into consideration the Bus Factor, then this is a problem they will need to address. Don't take this responsibility on to yourself as it never was yours ...


13

Be honest, be serious, be remorseful. You were dumb, and got seduced by a power fantasy. You were unnecessarily rude on your way out the door. You deliberately did things to burn that bridge, and now you're hoping to unburn it. At this point, your old boss (if he's still in the old position, if he has a position open) is going to have to ask himself if ...


12

First off, if it had consequences they wouldn't affect you, other than that you'd either be terminated (so you wouldn't owe the money), or they might just make your life miserable. The best win-win solution is for you to have a frank discussion with your employer and explain that the job isn't what you were looking for, or wasn't what you thought it was. ...


11

There are many reasons for this. One is that yes, it is in their contract. If I'm making a million a year somewhere and you ask me to give that up and come and work for you, and then it doesn't work out and I can't get things accomplished with the team and resources provided, so I have to leave, then I will get X as compensation for wasting my time and ...


9

All these make me think that Bob will soon leave the company You only think that. You don't know. Probably Bob doesn't even know himself, due to him being assigned a new project soon: Next month, we will have a product owner and work using Scrum framework and the team will also include Bob. This sounds a lot more professional than before. If the ...


8

My friend was upset listening to these downgrading talk but just ignored it. Should she have said something about it or just suck it up and do her time and leave? Its not acceptable to have these kind of behavior regardless its your boss and his wife. The professional response would have been to not say something and just move on to another place where ...


8

Tell them immediately . They will not be happy about this, but it makes absolutely no sense to start there and resign right away. It's a lot of work to get a new employee into the system and it's better that you don't start at all. You should have told them as soon as you decided to go with Y. The earlier they know, the easier it for them to deal with this ...


6

You should certainly change your passwords, but on most corporate setups accessing your personal accounts would take deliberate action bordering on malice, and assistance from IT staff. malice I assume you were logged on to your own user account, as is normal practice. This means that your browser history/saved logins can only be accessed by someone logged ...


6

Having no replacement is your company's problem, not yours. No reason to feel guilty about it. Even more so if the job is stressful and you don't get things you expected to get. Imagine you died. From a business point of view (except for the drama) this is the same as quitting, only without notice. Would you still feel guilty from beyond the grave that you ...


6

It's a two-way street. Companies are looking out for themselves and you should do the same. The promises they made we're not kept and it is not your responsibility for the state of things before you leave. Ultimately management should have ensured more than one person could fill your shoes when you leave. Unless you have shares in the company you should give ...


6

I've been in this situation before, and I think the answer depends on two things: Do you have any interest in helping them and getting paid for it? How willing are you to cut them off and perhaps impact your relationship with them? For me, I was not interested in continuing to work for them at all, but I also wanted to remain on good terms for things like ...


6

So you mentioned that your 6 months relocation re-payment clause is 6 months from when you got it, which is 5.5 months from today. You're only half a month / 6 weeks in as a new graduate, in which case I don't think you really know what the role in your current company will be yet. A business isn't very likely to drop a new starter into a large scale ...


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