526

Work your contractually obligated two hours and leave. You aren’t a slave.


346

How to tell a superior I won't be able to complete a task because I am going to quit in a month? You don't. You don't inform anyone until you are prepared to give your notice. Once you have done that, do your best to make the transition to whomever is replacing you as seamless as possible. Remember the saying "It isn't done until it is done." You ...


296

You need to talk to a lawyer, ASAP. It is absolutely unacceptable that a company would accept a forged resignation. It's understandable for them to have believed it initially, but once you came in to say it wasn't you, an investigation should have started. Whether you want to keep this job or not, it is unethical for them to leave you suddenly unemployed ...


282

This is precisely the reason you should never give any more details than absolutely necessary when asking for time off. Just say "personal time" for every request you make, and then you don't need to lie in this scenario, because you just put "personal time" again.


254

It seems to me that your boss believes the reasons you are leaving are entirely about you: your loss, your grief, your health. Your boss hopes that in a few months, these reasons will change leaving you back where you were before the loss: liking your job and happy to do it. If you have information that your boss doesn't (actually I was getting pretty fed ...


231

No. You gain nothing by signing and potentially limit your employment options by agreeing to the non-compete. By rights, if they were acting legitimately they would have had you sign one as part of your initial employment conditions before you even started the job. This is retrospective CYA nonsense and you should treat it as such. If they really want you ...


226

No, you should not. A bonus is for past work. You've done that work, and you've earned the bonus. And think of it this way, would you have felt guilty if you left six months after getting a bonus? Three months? A month? Two weeks? A week? Would there ever be a day you felt guilty if you resigned that day, but not if you resigned the day after?


224

It's only been 2 weeks... I'd argue that you don't have to mention this job at all. When asked why you're job searching you can explain why you left your previous position. If for any reason you can't omit a job from your work history no matter how short (locale, the type of job you're applying for, etc.), you can be honest without going into details: I'm ...


222

How do I handle this? Professionally and while doing your utmost to remain calm and dispassionate. How do I stop her from exploding? You can't. She probably will based on the past interactions you described. Simply hand in your notice and remain professional. Your goal is to hand in your notice, be clear on your final day and nothing else. How to I ...


222

Create the documentation you would otherwise make for this sysadmin and leave it at that. If this coworker is deliberately sabotaging the knowledge transfer then let him (and the company who employed him in a senior position) pay the price. It isn't your problem anymore. Do what you agreed to do and prepare the KT docs. Don't do any more than what you are ...


219

The ethical thing to do is ask your company if it's OK to use the code to attend even though you will have finished up there by that time. And then abide by their answer on the matter.


218

How can I gracefully and professionally resign from this situation without causing a panic? You can resign as gracefully and professionally as you would have, had the senior-most team member not already resigned. The fact that these two events happened in close temporal proximity is not your fault, and should not be of much concern. Just be ...


211

Documentation. Reasonably frequent code commits. Documentation. Document your ideas, your designs and your code. Any gotchas you're aware of. Documentation. Document your bug fixes explaining what the problem was and how you've fixed it, and why. And did I mention documentation? If you work in an environment where policy is lax (so junior devs can ...


211

Your employment is not dependent on others' employment (or resignation). Period. If you chose to leave, you are free to, provided you fulfill the requirements as mentioned in the contract regarding the exit process. If the organization has a backup plan, they will work according to that. If they don't have one: not your problem. If they feel they cannot ...


208

Frankly, what they say is their problem and not yours. And it's their problem in the real world. Your boss is just being stupid. In the EU, if notice is given up to day X then the company has to pay you up to day X, and that's that. No discussions at all. You can tell them that what they want you to do is absolute nonsense, that you are not taking unpaid ...


207

This is exactly what a notice period is for -- to transfer as much of your knowledge about the work as possible to other people so the company doesn't lose it. They aren't "taking from you" anything except what is theirs because they paid you for it. It's not about you, it's about the business. Stop sulking and cooperate. As others have pointed out, you're ...


202

Did she basically tell me to look for another company? If this is your main and only question, I will just answer that instead of telling you what you should do. It is impossible to tell with complete confidence what she meant when she told you what she told you. However, I would interpret more as: "Stop complaining, focus on your work by looking at ...


195

A business would not hesitate to terminate you if it was important for the business success. You should not hesitate to terminate the business if it's important for your success. The company is not family.


189

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


183

I'd go in with something valuable you can do over that month so it's not you playing minesweeper at your desk. If you've been there long enough you should know some things that need to get done but never do, which should take a few weeks to complete. Basically you want to go with the attitude of: Hey look, legally you need to keep me around, so here's ...


183

Go online and change all the passwords now for your personal accounts. Obviously the OP no longer has access to the work machine, so this means either using a machine at home or even going to an internet cafe or equivalent to log in to all accounts as necessary and change passwords. Work associated accounts like work email they will be able to, and have ...


174

Serve the two weeks notice. Your new employer will likely respect this decision, as they will want the same courtesy someday.* For your former company, leaving without notice gives the perception that you are unprofessional. You likely don't care about the former company's perception (sounds like it's not great already), but you SHOULD care about how your ...


174

It's hard to deal with constant manipulation. Two weeks of this nonsense will surely be a challenge. It may be tempting to sabotage, lash out, not show up for work, or otherwise try to avoid the problem or strike back. But do your best to be the professional one in this scenario, and keep the following guidelines in mind: Disengage and de-escalate. Do your ...


172

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


172

Is that too much to ask? Not at all, rather they should be providing you with the written offer, before you ask. DO NOT, I repeat, do not resign until you have a signed and sealed contract / offer in your hands. There can be many reasons why your former boss cannot show you the contract before you resign - and none of the reasons are reasonable. This is ...


172

Indeed this is a big red flag. By requiring you to join them and quit your current job first, your position to negotiate any terms in that offer letter is significantly compromised. I would recommend refusing to join them before having a signed contract in hand.


171

I had someone recommend that I completely leave this job off resume and simply tell potential recruiters/interviewers that I took some time off to travel and whatnot. I think that might look better than trying to explain why i left a big insurance company after 5 months. That someone gave you bad advice. You would be better off not lying. Imagine a ...


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