99

Go see a lawyer. My employer has informed me that this was a mistake (they won't communicate it in writing) As a general rule, when companies have the force of law on their side (and even when they don't) they send demands in writing. When they don't, it is usually because they are doing something they don't want someone to see. Who that someone maybe ...


29

Rule of Thumb: Don't burn the bridge while you're leaving. While your intentions are good (you're trying to provide honest feedback), it can easily be misinterpreted, more so since you're expressing those just before you're leaving (exit interview, etc.). You won't be available for a dicussion and to defend your decision / opinion. Keep it simple: Mention ...


19

Well, if you're prepared to quit, then you really don't have anything to lose. However, it's not a good practice to quit over a situation you never informed your manager of, and never gave them a chance to address. You should inform your manager of the situation immediately, and especially how it's affected you to the point that you want to quit ...


14

Keep you resignation letter short and to the point. Make it nice and grateful but there is no need to put any reason in there at all. If no one asks why, you are done. If your boss ask, I see no reason not to be open honest about it. Make it constructive and about you. Example "incompatible management style" "the way projects are run is not a good cultural ...


13

How much notice is appropriate given the above 3 conditions? Give the notice that is either legally required or is the norm for your locale. Where I live that would be 2 weeks. Remember that this "crunch time" project has already been continually postponed throughout the last 6 months. If necessary, it will get postponed again. Is there any way that ...


11

Until you've received a resignation letter from the employee I would recommend that you continue to manage them as per normal. That means, if they underperform then you may need to reprimand them as appropriate. If they under perform in a major way or do something grossly unprofessional then you still have the ability to terminate them but be very careful ...


10

"Are you sure? I will go back to them to see if they can support" Clearly your staffing company thought that it is you who is requesting the extension and not the manager. You just have to clearly word it out something like My manager here has asked me to extend my last day. I want to help them out if I can. Can we do it?


8

How bad would that look on my resume if I were to leave after only 8 months? It would look better than being fired after 6 months like last time. Apart from that it's not much of an asset.


8

The small projects are extremely tedious and involve manual data entry. It's stuff that should be automated, however they do not authorize me to spend work time developing a script/application to automate the process. To quotes @benjamin's comment : Is it possible for you to set aside some time to automating tasks without explicit permission? If you ...


7

One of the things you're going to learn as you gain more experience in the workplace is that the person who most deserves a promotion is not always (maybe even rarely) the one who gets it. The person who does the best job, but doesn't advertise his contributions, is awkward in meetings, or doesn't rub shoulders with the boss, is going to lose. You will ...


7

Is there anything from employment laws/standards I can cite to get them to go away, or can they seriously demand I pay them this money? Yes, see below. The government can probably force them to pay what they owe you, and perhaps, even tack on an extra administrative fine of 15% for not having paid you on time in the first place. Will that make them go ...


6

I'm not sure how this is a problem. At all. You've got two parties, and you're simply a medium of communication between the two. Just relay their messages diligently, keeping both sides apprised of the situation. Either all three parties are okay with it (you, the company, the temp agency) and you work the extra hours, or someone has a problem with it ...


6

The internal situation of the company seems complicated. However, it is not your business to handle their problems. They had to deal with your issue quickly. Your best course of action is: give them an ultimatum to pay you until a date you choose; inform them that you will seek legal support; hopefully, you have records (e-mails) of all (most) ...


6

I would advise following the advice here and just finish your period of time: https://haken-kachigumi.com/quit-while-contracted.html (You wrote you were in Japan, so it is Japan specific advice, and as such it is in Japanese) 労働基準法第16条 使用者は、労働契約の不履行について違約金を定め、又は損害賠償額を予定する契約をしてはならない。 There is this part of the law which means that the company cannot ...


6

You won't be the first person whom a company employed telling him he will do a more advanced job than they actually intended to give him, and you certainly won't be the last. That kind of bait-and-switch is rather old. They gave you that job because any experienced software developer would tell them to pound sand. If their intention was to have serious ...


6

I'm leaving my job and I'm wondering if I should address the letter to both the Direct Boss and the Overall Head. You are overthinking this by a wide margin. Just resign to your "Direct Boss" and let them handle it from there. As word gets around, perhaps your Overall Head will want to talk to you about it.


5

It's good practice to always keep your portfolio up to date with projects as you complete/work on them. By having this practice in place, with your portfolio having relatively regular updates (say, once a year around the same time), you easily remove suspicion that might surround that kind of move. On top of which, any workplace that would fire you for ...


5

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


4

Your boss could potentially find you a better position, so don't turn down a potential job because you believe it'll be worse. Potentially, the pay may be lower but have better benefits. Let your boss refer you to a potential position, and politely turn it down if it doesn't meet your expectations. As far as your notice period goes, understand what you're ...


4

While I understand your ethical concerns, it is the management's job to build an organization that can survive an employee quitting. How much notice is appropriate given the above 3 conditions? Whatever is mandated by your employment contract, which is literally what your employer defined as appropriate. Of course you may decide to give a longer notice, ...


4

It sounds like your manager is not one of these two. So tell him/her what is going on right now. Hopefully, he can solve the problem. If he can, than you have nothing more to worry about. If he cant, then if you choose to leave, then he will be more understanding of the situation and less likely to give you a negative recommendation.


4

If you have another job to move into where you feel the working environment will be more calm and supportive, then just hand your notice in and leave. If asked, just say that the new job is a better fit for your future plans and leave it at that. You don’t have to declare the actual reason for leaving.


4

Answer depends a lot of the country and what your goal here is. In most countries, the next step would be to get a lawyer to draft a letter stating the history, the relevant laws, the specific demands, the deadline and the consequences if missed. Sent this on official lawyer stationary by registered mail to the national head office. To keep the cost down ...


4

not sure how to talk about it down the line when seeking positions That implies that you need to know how to handle the interview. Well, as discussed countless times, you need to be politically correct and NEVER say anything bad about for former employer(s). Therefore: Job involved a relocation Is a perfectly safe and reasonable reason to leave a job. ...


3

I did something similar once. I had personal problems with my project manager, and he was also one of the reasons I left. Could that be the case for you? But because everybody else knew, everybody else could prepare, and I actively managed knowledge transfer, so the rest of the team wouldn't suffer. Even my department head was informed, so he had the chance ...


3

I'm leaving my job and I'm wondering if I should address the letter to both the Direct Boss and the Overall Head. If it were me I wouldn't... because that's my personal preference. I follow the "chain of command" unless there's an issue that dictates that I break the chain of command. If you feel that OH would feel sighted by not sending it to them then ...


3

I would recommend talking with an employment lawyer to get professional advice before making a decision on how to proceed. In my experience being bonded to a role tends to be linked to receiving some sort of unusual benefit, for example the company funds expensive training etc. In other words if you leave early you have to pay back the training cost. But it'...


2

I think there are a few interesting dynamics at play here. I'll try to keep my comments constructive: If they're new in the Scrum Master role, then pride may be getting in the way of their taking your feedback on board. i.e. They may want to be seen to be right rather than doing the right thing, if that makes any sense. A part of the Scrum Master role is ...


2

I have been in very similar situation. I would advise - as other commenters have - don't quit if you don't have another job lined up (i.e. start looking). I understand that this current work may suck and you may be doing things you see as time wasting (related xkcd) but when you are in a junior role you more or less do what you are told. In the eyes of ...


2

From the comments: "Frankly, I don't wanna join this startup at all! The ONLY reason I want their offer is so I can use it as leverage to drive up my compensation in other companies. So I need a safe way of accepting their offer (without signing anything), that I can later turn down." This is an important piece of context that should have been in ...


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