150

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Politely without committing to anything. Once you hand in your resignation they have no way of forcing anything. If they want to spend that time having meetings instead of preparing handover that isn't your problem.


109

You're reading a lot into his behaviour. Sure, those could be signs he's about to quit, but they are more general signs of unhappiness. It could mean trouble in his personal life, dissatisfaction with his job that's not bad enough to quit over, poor mental or physical health, or something else. Unless his performance is falling below acceptable, then as a ...


89

You use the broken record method. Whatever they say, your answer is “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th of June”. If they ask why you are leaving you say “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th of June”. If they ask what it takes to make you stay you say “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th ...


84

If the facts are with you, argue the facts. If the law is with you, argue the law. If nothing is with you, just argue. ————— old lawyer's proverb This is the sound of them having nothing to offer you. They can't offer a serious money raise, or they would have offered it already. They can't place you in a job role you find fulfilling, or they would have ...


34

You do not take or leave jobs based on what is best for the employer. You take or leave jobs based on what is best for you. It appears that you are at least ok at graphic design. Others might be better, but you're meeting this client's needs. You probably have some other skills, like listening to what the client wants or accepting change requests, that are ...


29

You've accepted another offer, you've given your leave and you're moving on. There's nothing they can do about it. You don't need to tell them anything. If they ask where you're going you can simply say that you had 'another opportunity' and you've made up your mind. If they try to make offers to get you to say, you can simply thank them and decline to stay. ...


28

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Try something like: "Thank you. But no." Repeat as often as necessary.


22

If you are well prepared to lose a person, what would be needed? You are evidently a developer given you Stack Overflow profile. If turnover in China is anything like it is in North America (developers last 1-3 years on average), losing developers is a common occurrence and something most teams should be prepared for. The key questions to answer: Do they ...


17

I would write a formal email to my manager along the lines of: As you know, I have decided to quit this company to pursue my personal career goals. I greatly appreciate your ongoing engagement to keep me on board, and it shows me how much the company values my work. Unfortunately, I have made my decision and committed myself elsewhere and I don’t break my ...


14

He immediately told his boss, but he did not find any solution. I also know (informally) that some big boss asked why there is such a big attrition rate in that department (generally the company culture is great and the attrition rate is quite small), so managers are struggling to keep all folks in place. scheduled a few other 1:1 meetings to ...


12

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Be polite with him. It looks to me that he's making a real (although maybe a clumsy one) effort to keep you. Problem is, in the workplace is not always possible to do what one feels is good. He is feeling very likely much ...


9

Obviously the current situation really complicates questions like this and my advise is that you stay put until after the crisis to avoid ending up with no job at all. This was not part of the question though so the following answer is the one I'd give in 'normal' times. My advise would be to sit down and have an open, honest and frank conversation with ...


8

"Internship you're not qualified for." This is a possibility in vacuum... for someone the boss hasn't worked with before. This isn't a possibility for you. Why? Because the boss has worked with you before, has liked the quality of your work, and wants to keep you onboard. This isn't a question of whether you're not qualified. You absolutely, positively ...


8

Have a direct conversation with your colleague. You have a better chance of having mis-interpreted the situation than having correctly guessed your colleague's intentions - even if experience suggests otherwise. Instead of guessing the intentions and feelings of your colleague, engage them in a caring and direct conversation: If you're intent on letting ...


7

That really depends on how certain you are that you will get the boot. Quitting while not having a new job lined up is not a great idea versus Quitting looks indeed better then being fired and it's easier to answer "so why did you leave your job at XXX" which inevitably will come up in most interviews If you are very certain you will be dismissed, pro-...


6

I think the best thing you can do is to change your feelings regarding this. Instead of being annoyed by everything try to be amused instead. Amused that they think you will reconsider. Amused that they want you to stay but offer nothing. Amused they use your time for meetings instead of handover. Amused that they think you are ok with using old technology. ...


6

You'd need to check your contract and your state law, you might be able to leave without notice. Normally that is considered somewhere between rude and unprofessional, but in the current circumstances your old company might not mind at all. If you are furloughed you can't do any work during a 14 day notice period, so there is no reason to hold you back. ...


5

One time, I had a boss who would scream at all his employees. The guy was a bully. He was extremely difficult to work for. One morning, he just wouldn't stop screaming at his secretary. And his secretary took a break, called HR to tell them she quit, and never came back. Now legally, she probably didn't have the right to do that because she still had her ...


5

You have one life and it's yours to live. If you aren't happy and wont achieve your goals then you should find something else. Whether it kills the company isn't really something you should worry about. You are not the company. If its success relies on one person in a team of several, then it's probably going to fail anyway. - Never think that you are ...


5

I'm with @Jon Custer : To me it sounds like one member of the committee has a bee in their bonnet. Do not resign unless the full committee, in an official meeting, asks something similar of you. If contacted again privately by the individual, just tell them to bring it up at the next meeting and hang up. Some people are so used to everyone agreeing with ...


4

I have been in a similar situation in the past. The contract in Virginia was coming to an end. The company gave us two weeks notice, and then after that point they would only pay for insurance for a month. After that we were terminated. I had a coworker that found a new job during the two weeks notice, the let him go the same day he told them. Now he had an ...


4

Is it necessary to give notice while furloughed? No. You are not working and you are not getting paid. In fact, while on Furlough you are not allowed to do ANYTHING for your employer, so any notice period would be completely pointless. This being said, you can still be nice and professional about it. Hand in your notice and ask for any notice period to be ...


3

First of all, my understanding of "politically motivated" is around behaviour designed to give someone power. It's quite disjoint from what your apparent meaning is, which is criticisms of political statements. But there may be a locale specific meaning at play. Like it or not, what you do on your personal site reflects on the NGO. Especially if you are one ...


2

Nothing can hurt one's career other than their pessimistic mindset. After completing your MBA, you would still be considered as a fresher. Mentioning your five months of industry experience can do no harm. You can always mention that pursuing MBA was your main interest and you had a 5-6 months or an year's time before you could join college. And hence ...


2

It is quite clear what you should be doing in this situation: Find a different position that is either better professionally or financially or both. When you have a signed contract, you give your notice and say goodbye. Right now (April 2020) it will be a bit harder to find a job, but you can still try. And when you give notice, the iron rule: Do NOT ...


1

All of the above suggestions for shutting down the conversation with your longtime boss and coworker are poor suggestions, imo. Having worked with this person for years, leaving a clear and happy atmosphere behind you is important. Be unfailingly bright and personable in your responses. With goodwill, answer: The decision to leave was difficult, and not ...


1

I was in a very similar situation to yours almost a decade ago. Working on a software solution I didn't like ("The Bad Place"), with managament making vague promises that I would be moved to the other solution I liked ("The Good Place") but no specific commitment in terms of a timeline. You're doing the right thing, leaving a job that doesn't make you happy,...


1

Even if you quit tomorrow, you'd still need to work out your notice period. In my experience, that's usually a week while still on probation, so quitting is unlikely to help you prepare for your interview. It's good that you have a safety net, but I think you also need to ask yourself what you'll do if you quit now and don't get the job you're interviewing ...


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