139

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? No. Slavery time is over, and if a company does not want to lose you, they are free to rectify whatever bothers you to convince you to stay. But you certainly are free to resign from a job whenever you please, and given the 3 months notice period, there is no way for it to constitute an "...


27

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? For your resignation to qualify being abusive your employer must prove harmful intent. In theory quitting in the middle of a key project for the company could qualify (source here) but only if they can prove it was your intent that they present an unfinished project. A 3 months notice is ...


22

The other answers raise good points, many of which I agree with, but I'll offer a counter-position which I think is worth considering I have no intents to burn bridges or harm my employer. Frankly, there's a high risk you'll do both here. Not just that, but if you quit now, you won't have delivered this important project. Yes, you're being paid day to ...


9

First of all, you didn't resign with the intent of hurting either your company or your boss. Obviously no one can hold you responsible for this. I don't think leaving just before a deadline is a case of abusive resignation, your boss should be the one to always be ready for someone leaving, even in a small company. If you don't have interest anymore, you ...


5

Even if the company manages to hire a new developer to replace me before the exhibition, it is highly unlikely that the v2 will be ready in June. This is sometimes called having a "bus number" of one. This refers to the rather macabre calculation of the smallest number of employees who would seriously threaten the project or even the company if they were ...


3

It is not your problem, it is theirs There is nothing special about your resignation. A company always has the risk that one or more employees become unavailable, for whatever reason, temporarily or not. There is something special about what the company did. They choose to accept this risk, instead of preventing the problem. It is not part of your job ...


1

As already discussed by most answers: this is very unlikely to be taken as (better yet proven) to be harmful intent. You're almost certainly safe from a legal standpoint. You have no obligation to stay but I ask that you keep this in mind. It's very likely that you will burn bridges by this action, and it may have consequences on references and your CV. It ...


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