515

Work your contractually obligated two hours and leave. You aren’t a slave.


254

It seems to me that your boss believes the reasons you are leaving are entirely about you: your loss, your grief, your health. Your boss hopes that in a few months, these reasons will change leaving you back where you were before the loss: liking your job and happy to do it. If you have information that your boss doesn't (actually I was getting pretty fed ...


226

No, you should not. A bonus is for past work. You've done that work, and you've earned the bonus. And think of it this way, would you have felt guilty if you left six months after getting a bonus? Three months? A month? Two weeks? A week? Would there ever be a day you felt guilty if you resigned that day, but not if you resigned the day after?


225

It's only been 2 weeks... I'd argue that you don't have to mention this job at all. When asked why you're job searching you can explain why you left your previous position. If for any reason you can't omit a job from your work history no matter how short (locale, the type of job you're applying for, etc.), you can be honest without going into details: I'm ...


222

Create the documentation you would otherwise make for this sysadmin and leave it at that. If this coworker is deliberately sabotaging the knowledge transfer then let him (and the company who employed him in a senior position) pay the price. It isn't your problem anymore. Do what you agreed to do and prepare the KT docs. Don't do any more than what you are ...


211

Your employment is not dependent on others' employment (or resignation). Period. If you chose to leave, you are free to, provided you fulfill the requirements as mentioned in the contract regarding the exit process. If the organization has a backup plan, they will work according to that. If they don't have one: not your problem. If they feel they cannot ...


208

Frankly, what they say is their problem and not yours. And it's their problem in the real world. Your boss is just being stupid. In the EU, if notice is given up to day X then the company has to pay you up to day X, and that's that. No discussions at all. You can tell them that what they want you to do is absolute nonsense, that you are not taking unpaid ...


203

Did she basically tell me to look for another company? If this is your main and only question, I will just answer that instead of telling you what you should do. It is impossible to tell with complete confidence what she meant when she told you what she told you. However, I would interpret more as: "Stop complaining, focus on your work by looking at ...


196

A business would not hesitate to terminate you if it was important for the business success. You should not hesitate to terminate the business if it's important for your success. The company is not family.


189

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


183

I'd go in with something valuable you can do over that month so it's not you playing minesweeper at your desk. If you've been there long enough you should know some things that need to get done but never do, which should take a few weeks to complete. Basically you want to go with the attitude of: Hey look, legally you need to keep me around, so here's ...


182

Go online and change all the passwords now for your personal accounts. Obviously the OP no longer has access to the work machine, so this means either using a machine at home or even going to an internet cafe or equivalent to log in to all accounts as necessary and change passwords. Work associated accounts like work email they will be able to, and have ...


170

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


164

Would you want a co-worker to alert management if they suspected you were leaving? The problem here is that you could really damage someone's career by precipitating his termination before he finds another job. Sadly, the job market is extremely harsh and "red-flags" any candidate who happens to be unemployed. It's just work, let it go, what's the worst ...


163

We tend to love our jobs more than our jobs love us. You should not feel bad at all about going in and working just two hours. If you have been mistreated at that job, it will be just deserts when you leave, or stop working (and use your time to socialize on your last day). When I was in the Army, there was an NCO who tended to pile-on to short-timers, ...


155

If it is your personal property then you have every right to ask him to return it. Ask now to give him time to sort his own replacement or you might consider selling it to him.


154

What is in your contract? If there is no written contract, no problem. You just say thank you but no, thank you, that's not the deal we had, and walk away. Stress the part about meetings and completion date changes certainly not being what you agreed to. You have no obligation to respect deal you didn't make. If the contract you signed does not say a thing ...


146

While turning around in an exit interview and saying you're leaving because your new manager is an arse may seem like a good idea (been there, done that), it doesn't achieve anything when said directly. The question why are you leaving is for them to get feedback on why employees leave, not for you to justify why you're leaving. You could turn around and ...


143

How to gracefully leave a company you helped start? Speak with the other partners in an open and honest manner. Explain as you have here, and provide a reasonable notice -- say 30 days in this case before departing. This is plenty of time to hire up, knowledge transfer, etc. Also, if you desire, offer up a per hour consultant role, where you could be ...


138

Not only is it impolite, it might actually be cause for being fired on the spot. Even if you are leaving and on your notice period, you are still a contracted employee and you are still required to do the tasks asked of you. Nothing changes in that regard until you actually leave. Whether or not you work on your existing tasks, handover, or new things ...


138

my manager was made to undergo anger management training I don't know about your situation, but Alcoholics Anonymous have Step 8 & 9 in their program: Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. Step 9: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure ...


135

Specifically Gmail you can log out remotely: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/8154 Sign out from another computer If you forgot to sign out of your email on another computer, you can remotely sign out of Gmail. Open Gmail. In the bottom right corner, click Details and then Sign out all other web sessions. Tip: If you’re using a public or ...


121

Your best bet isn't to put a limit on how many times they can call you, it's to simply say that you are now unable to take calls during the day while you're at work. Invite them to email you if they have problems, and you may take a look when you get home, in your personal time. Say that you're unable to answer queries while you're at your new job. Dropping ...


121

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


110

Should I let management know that I consider leaving the company due to these practices? Never say directly that you are thinking of leaving - as soon as management know that you're not committed to the company, that always puts you at risk of being out of a job without a new one to go to. Or at least let them know that I am growing quite frustrated? ...


110

None of what you've stated is empirical evidence that Bob is planning on leaving. Additionally, none of this is your business. Should you inform the future PO that Bob may be leaving soon? No.


106

You don't have to say anything in that interview and a few canned responses ("looking for new opportunities", "want to grow professionally", "in search of new challenges") will do to not appear unhelpful. You are right, a judgement like "is a jerk" especially without facts to support it is not helpful at all. HR will just dismiss it. If you say your new ...


100

Go see a lawyer. My employer has informed me that this was a mistake (they won't communicate it in writing) As a general rule, when companies have the force of law on their side (and even when they don't) they send demands in writing. When they don't, it is usually because they are doing something they don't want someone to see. Who that someone maybe ...


95

If he didn't offer you compensation, you do not have a normal professional relationship. You have been cheated of three days of pay. Your company evidently is not careful about making accusations if they can badly pull a report and not be bothered to check that they generated it correctly before they put you on suspension. That is a bad sign. Apologies are ...


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