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2

In your particular situation (call handler at the U.K. National Health I'd first check if you can’t start that new job earlier. Like tomorrow. Check how much notice your employer has to give you legally / according to your contract. And check if they are decent people. If not, you give notice at the last possible moment (when it’s legally required). If yes,...


0

I think I can help. If you are currently serving your notice period or have officially left the Company you previous worked for you are not automatically eligible for the government furlough payment which covers 80% of employees regardless of contract types on or before 28/02/2020 at a maximum claim of £2500 per month with a maximum annual salary of £37,...


1

Its my understanding that if the company where to apply for the UK government furlough scheme you are required to be a full time employee for them to get the grants, employees that have been let go or have left, are not entitled. So sadly if you're not full time with them then you're not entitled to it. However during your notice period, you are a full ...


7

According to Martin Lewis' website https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-self-employed-and-employment-help/ furlough may be available to you but it is up to your old employers. This has been clarified with the government. Lost your job due to coronavirus, or were in process of changing job? Furlough may still be available - but it's ...


22

Am I entitled to Furlough payment, despite the fact I had handed in my 4 weeks written notice? In short, no you aren't entitled to it, the employer is the one who makes a claim for it and it's up to them whether they want to furlough an employee - they need the employee's consent to do so but the employee can't demand that the company furlough them. As @...


1

The world is in a strange place now. And your job stability is a complex one. If company A is in a situation where they will have no reason to let people go during this pandemic, then your position is solid during this crisis. So doing nothing is an acceptable action because you might be able to stay long after the crisis ends. If company A has a reason to ...


1

I see two perspectives to this: Will this affect your reputation in the industry / with other employers? Potentially. This depends a lot on context, I find. Do you have a good relationship with your current employer? Are they aware that you are still intending to look for another job? If so, they expressed a stance towards this decision of yours? How ...


4

Is it acceptable to remain with Company A and immediately continue looking for new roles, and possibly "resign" again within 1 - 2 months? I don't think "acceptable" is the right term to use in this context. Of course it's acceptable for you. But think about if it's "advisable". As you indicate, you likely won't get another reprieve if you get your ...


14

To be honest, you're not going to get a concrete answer. I mean, you could approach it from a sheer, personalized utilitarian perspective and say "I should be looking out for myself, and if my best strategy is to find Company C, I should start looking." You could approach it from a "Do I want to screw over Company A after they gave me a safe harbor during ...


0

Basic contract law in probably all civilized countries states that two parties can agree on anything that is not against the law. So if the employee and employer want to agree on something, being it reinstatement or contract dissolution without notice period or free ice cream, they can do so. Termination of a contract requires only one party's consent ...


2

This sounds like they are trying to achieve a goal that will deceive somebody. It could be done to make them a new employee and qualify them for a benefit, or to eliminate their qualification for a benefit. They could be doing this to manipulate their employee count on a specific day. They could be doing this to claim they punished them, but then reinstate ...


2

If you ask an employee to resign, any reasonable employee will just say “no”. If my company fired me, I can guarantee that I wouldn’t return for the same salary. I once had an employee tell our whole team of about 20 people that our department would be closed. They made the mistake of waiting until the next morning to tell everyone that they had plenty of ...


0

Not a lawyer, and depends on jurisdiction, but I'm pretty sure this is one of those no taksies backsies things. When a job is terminated it's terminated - it's one party deciding to end the contract with the other. A "reinstatement" or reversal would entail a new job offer and would have to be agreed by both parties since slavery or indentured servitude is ...


4

I don't see this as too much of an issue given your past experience and tenure. You have learnt a valuble lesson though - don't join a company just because you like the sound of one project! Projects can change. Concentrate on finding a job that you like a range of work and the type of projects they do. 1) Whether there is anything else i can do? - You ...


1

Ask your lawyer friend to do what he can, and quickly. When a company is struggling, they'll have a big pile of debts like yours, and if they go bankrupt, almost none of those debts will be paid. The trick is to get at least part of what they owe you while there's still a chance. The longer they continue like this, the more people will be hurt at the end.


4

Complain to the Ministry of Labor in Mexico. In most countries, the Ministry of Labor/Department of Labor/Labor Commissioner is in charge of recovering unpaid wages. Unfortunately, I don't know Spanish, so I can't get the exact link for you.


10

I was in a similar situation where I got a contract job via a staffing agency in a large consultancy firm and via the consultancy firm I worked for another company. Although I had a legal contract with the staffing agency, I first notified the consultancy firm because I wanted to keep a good relationship with them and I explained my reasoning for leaving. ...


15

Notify the staffing agency first, then let them decide how the company you're contracted to is notified. Assume that the party who is told first, may inform the other party before you get a chance to do so yourself. If you inform the company first and they inform the agency before you talk to them, your actual employer will hear that you will be leaving, ...


141

Notify only the staffing agency. They will want to control the messaging to the client, possibly line someone up to take over before telling them, and so on. They may well be rightfully angry at you if you tell the client directly. And the client doesn’t want to have to worry/think about it, that’s why they are using a contract firm. That is the ...


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Notify the staffing agency You don’t want to tell the company you are contracted to, have the boss there send off a hasty email to your company, and have your company be blindsided while you get stuck in a chat with a co-worker before you can tell them.


2

Contracts are not mutually exclusive items. You can have more than one contract apply to your life at any given moment. Contracts should be non-conflicting. As long as the two contracts can exist in such a way that you don't violate either one, you can have both apply to your life. That means you need to make sure the new contract doesn't interfere with ...


6

They can insist, but they can't force you. In general it's perfectly legal to sign a contract with a new company while still on notice-period as long as the starting date of the new contract doesn't overlap with your notice-period stated in the contract of the current company. As @dwizum already mentioned in his comment, it's actually in your favour to ...


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