New answers tagged

0

"I hired this lady to help me start with a project" .... "she considers herself as a co-founder of the company" Well that's solved then. As co-founder she has access to the bank accounts and can pay herself whatever your Board of Directors will allow. "I'm willing to pay her small bonus out of my own pocket" ... ok, but did you really make a mistake? ...


16

Any ideas how should I handle this? Unless she has some sort of legal claim, essentially a contract that grants her XXXXXX, you should completely ignore this. Do not respond to her further. If she goes through the expense of obtaining legal council, then and only then, engage a lawyer on your behalf. Also, paying her when you don't have to might make ...


12

Yes, they would have to pay you in almost all developed countries in the world. You've essentially left (very early) during your probationary period, so the company would have to pay you in full for all the days you have worked thus far, and then terminate your employment contract.


0

Depends on country. I would imagine in any country though they have to prove that you have it or at least responsible for it. Either you signed off on a custody form or if you acknowledge you received it somehow. When I receive equipment from my employer, they made me sign a document saying I received one laptop and a keyboard. At the end of my employment, I ...


0

This actually has happened to me once some years ago. I was employed full time working for a large multinational, based in Northern Virginia, near Washing DC. My wife was accepted into a graduate program abroad (in UK) and I decided to move with her. I wasn't sure how things would work out in the UK, so it was great when I was offered a similar 3-months "...


2

Be aware of the type of contract you are given. Signing a temporary leave might mean having to come back and give the notice period 3 months from now. I was in a very similar place two years ago, where my team lead tried to convince me into not giving notice before holidays, and coming back for a month more. Fortunately, as they say, several heads think ...


1

In most countries, if there is a dispute then they cannot just deduct money from your salary. They can take you to court over the cost of the iPad obviously, but they can't just take it out of your salary. That said, if you don't have that iPad, I'd tell the company that you don't have this iPad (either you never had it at all, or you never took it home, or ...


7

Since this is Indian context, you should read your joining letter very carefully from the MNC you have already joined - it will contain clauses as to what you can and can not do with respect to prematurely ending your employment. Many companies keep a seven day notice period during the first three months (of probation) - if you have that, use it to tell ...


2

It you want to leave your job after a day - frankly that's your choice. Good on you for being so honest with yourself and putting your professional needs first. Check your contract with MNC co. with a fine tooth comb check your probation notice period. I'm not going to reiterate the excellent advice given to you from the Indian commentators Also get in ...


3

You are one day in to your job and you want to leave. Of course the MNC can't do a lot about it, except word will go around amongst their network that your loyalty is pretty weak if a better offer comes along. You will hurt your chances of working for the MNC in future, and likely other companies too. However, what do you hope to gain by simply walking ...


13

This answer is written keeping your current context in mind and my experience working in India. What I want to know is if I abscond this organisation, would they be able to take any serious actions? I am assuming you have already completed the paperwork and signed the offer letter and any other papers. So, absconding is never a good idea. It could be ...


0

She gave you the freedom to interpret it as you wish. So is it. If she had wanted to fire you, she had communicated that. If she formulates unclear, that means that she does not want to communicate what she did not. They are the experts (in theory) of the personal matters and not you. Of course you have all the reasons to start to check your alternatives, ...


11

Go see a lawyer. It sounds like the company is trying pin something on you and the most effective defense is a registered letter by a lawyer and that a) clearly states that you have followed all processes and procedures, b) and that they should cease and desist in making false accusations or you will take formal legal action. I many cases a formal letter ...


1

No actually it's more complex than that. She clearly told you that you might resign or possibly get fired as well! The both sides need to make it work that you mention plus the metaphor of the relationship is the important part. It sends a clear message that the bullet points work both ways. Now combining this with your bullet points we can translate as ...


-5

DO NOT SIGN ANY SORT OF CONTRACT FOR SOMETHING YOU DO NOT EVEN WANT If this is a legitimate, well intentioned offer to consider taking you back, then there's absolutely no way that benefits from your signature. A willingness to consider taking you back is just that - a willingness - and it's only practically meaningful if at a future time both you and the ...


-3

Frame challenge "Keep calm and carry on" is good advice, while existing in misery with nothing productive to do is bad advice: you just sink deeper into depression.


6

Can they charge me for something they have no actual proof I have? No... but if you actually have it then you should return it, or well keep it if you want it but you are going to have to buy it. If you really don't have it, and they are claiming for it, politely reply indicating that you do not possess such item and ask them to double-check, and that if ...


12

I quit a job of 5 years and moved out of state. My company had never hired a person working out of state to work remote because it is a state funded agency and that's frowned upon. Five weeks later my former boss and I had a meeting and he outlined a proposal he would make to the powers that be... seven weeks later mountains had moved and I had my laptop ...


8

Any suggestions for how to handle this? Just resign from the company and don't sign any contract. Since you do not plan on returning to the company there is no need to give your boss the impression that you will return. Your statements below indicate that you are not going to return: I think he doesn't want me to quit or thinks that I will change my ...


18

One possible reason for the formal contract could be that your boss is not sure if he is going to be in the company in three months. If he i still there when you return, he could just give you a new contract but if he leaves, his promise will just be forgotten and he cannot help you anymore. By giving you a contract, he makes the promise official and binds ...


41

Be grateful for the opportunity. It seems your boss is really valuing your work. Do not dismiss this opportunity right now. Wait the three months and see where you are then. You can always decide after three months to not return. I'm worried there will be something weird in the contract? If the wording of the contract is unclear, or if you are afraid it ...


251

It seems to me that your boss believes the reasons you are leaving are entirely about you: your loss, your grief, your health. Your boss hopes that in a few months, these reasons will change leaving you back where you were before the loss: liking your job and happy to do it. If you have information that your boss doesn't (actually I was getting pretty fed ...


4

Not something I've heard of happening before - could be a nice gesture, or it could have strings attached (especially since there's a legal contract he wants you to sign.) Difficult for us to say from the question, so I'd definitely exercise caution. If you don't want to sign anything, and don't think it's something you'd use in any case, but appreciate the ...


0

If it's a good company and a good line manager, you have nothing to lose and a lot to gain by being open and transparent. Not all companies/bosses are like that, but your story about how quickly you were promoted makes me think this one probably is. Trust your own judgement on that, though. Just to illustrate the good things that can happen, I was in the ...


0

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month This is probably a red flag, although you need to get an opinion from someone who knows how things work in the part of the world where you are (India?). But, it looks to me that if they really wanted to send you an offer letter, they would not need a month. There's no plausible reason why ...


3

To be clear here, @PagMax has already provided a perfect answer to the main question - whether you are 'subtly being told to resign' or not. The answer is - you're being told to either accept the company's practices or resign. Which is a subtle way of saying that your demands are not going to be met by the company. Do not change your current course of ...


2

Can I resign without offer letter and only fitment letter? You can do whatever you want. I think the question you meant to ask is "Should I resign without offer letter and only fitment letter?" - To that, I would say no unless you're confident that you'll get the offer letter. Can they deny sending offer letter tomorrow? They can do whatever they want. ...


10

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month I can promise you over the phone that you will get rich, famous and own your own set of Yachts. (And there are business models build on doing just that for money). But should you believe that and resign because of that? Probably not. I'm sure they only accept written statements (or would ...


0

One reason people don't give honest feedback is that they're worried you might not give them a good reference. A solution would be to give them a written reference at the start of the exit interview. Show that you're not going to be vindictive. Another is that they might not want to criticize you to your face. That is why exit interviews are commonly done ...


7

HR are not stupid enough to directly pressure you to leave. That may be illegal in your country anyway. But I would translate the coded message as "The company is not going to change any time soon. That piece of information may be useful to you when making your own decision about your future career plans." Informally, you have already been marked down as ...


11

Going to throw in another interpretation: There are issues in the company. There are reasons for those issues, as we have previously discussed. We can't magically make them go away, so either be part of the solution, adapt, be silent (not specifically mentioned as an option), or go away. Complainers accomplish little. It sounds like you've already spoken ...


42

All great answers above. In short yes, you are told to deal with it or resign I'm a senior developer now (10+ years) but I've been through this stage of struggle in personal development. If you've had regular formal reviews, it is a common practice to belittle your achievements and exaggerate your failures, which usually means another yellow/red flag to ...


2

The real question is: how will your girlfriend's life change after she completes her specialisation? That should be the starting point of any consideration on her circumstances. In any case: Italy has very strong unions. Other countries don't have this luck. Your friends should be talking to a union representative. And... 70 hours per week are uncommon. In ...


17

Do you work with your girlfriend in the same job or at the same company. If not, don’t get involved. Your job is to listen, let her vent and make her feel better. You should not be pressuring her to act or do things she might not want to do. You are creating more stress. Buy some wine. Clean the bathroom. Make a nice meal. Give her a massage


6

This seems a straight forward case to form some sort of local worker representation inside the institution, or join a regional or national union and put pressure on management. Such misuse seems pretty common in the health care sector. Since there was already a chance for higher management to properly clean up their institution it seems it is one of the ...


26

I believe that the message was more like, "We aren't going to be able to restructure every aspect of your work experience to your satisfaction, so if you're serious about these complaints, you should just move on." So it may be a gentle attempt to get to commit to dealing with the reality of things staying as they are or commit to leaving, but I wouldn't ...


202

Did she basically tell me to look for another company? If this is your main and only question, I will just answer that instead of telling you what you should do. It is impossible to tell with complete confidence what she meant when she told you what she told you. However, I would interpret more as: "Stop complaining, focus on your work by looking at ...


50

Am I subtly told to resign? In this case: Why / what does it matter? Always remember: HR is not our friend, they will always try to protect the company's interest. In this case, HR sees (or, you are portrayed as) you as someone who is complaining, and given that you started the process "anonymously" and got exposed later - somehow depicts either of two: ...


1

How would I approach the resignation and what reason should I give, noting that my current job can easily find out that I left for the original competing company? I don't know if this will be considered unethical? This is only my second time joining a new company. There is no such thing as 'professional ethics' when it comes to choices concerning your ...


2

I'm assuming that your girlfriend otherwise loves her job and the people she's working with (and for) and wishes to remain working there if at all possible. Your girlfriend should reconnect with the same manager who dealt with the whistleblowing report and say that the desired outcome did not happen to satisfaction. Out of your new meeting, you need to ...


-1

Quietly look for another job and move amicably I am thinking about another anonymous whistleblow that could force the boss to change things. If the first one hasn't changed things, I doubt another one will change it either. Sadly, at times, the upper management doesn't care about the ground level issues, as long as the business is running. The best move ...


0

There are alternative input devices in so many forms and shapes nowadays that I wouldn't worry too much. And you should always keep in mind that your body is a truely wonderous machine that can repair a lot of damage. Don't assume that you'll never improve feeling in your damaged hand. Touchscreen and touchpad were already listed in other answers. You can ...


10

You have two main concerns, it seems: Not burning any bridges. Not violating any ethical constraints. So here ya go: First off, don't violate any legal or contractual obligations. You didn't give a location, so we can't say if those exist for you. If you're in the United States and didn't sign a contract guaranteeing you'd work for X weeks, then you're ...


2

I'm sorry to hear what happened to you. But I wouldn't worry about your productivity at work. As others have mentioned in comments, programming is not that much about typing. And there are many tools that can help you on the way: Voice commands instead of some keyboard shortcuts Programmable keyboard you can setup to do repetitive things in one click Touch ...


1

I'm really sorry for what happened to you and I hope you recover in the short time. I know that you're worried about your performance. Of course, typing slower will make you slower to try/test/debug/find resources, etc. Your performance may decrease in this area, but it doesn't mean that you won't be as good or valuable as before. You will need some months ...


2

I believe you will adapt, I knew a developer with some genetic disease that causd him to have tiny-baby hands, and he managed to code. Then there is this guy who lost halves of his fingers (like 50% of each finger) due to frostbite, and he types like crazy with whatever he has left. Remember how hard it was to type when you sat first time in front of a ...


8

I do software engineering and I know someone that lost their dominant hand in an accident and now uses their non-dominant hand to code. You wouldn't notice anything was amiss based on their work Unless you're writing documentation, does it honestly matter how fast you can type? In my experience, the quality of code is not set by how fast you can type it, ...


2

And now I want to join them for financial reasons and leave my current job during the probation period. Seems you have your reasons and already made up your mind. I'd not going to say it's unethical, but somewhat unprofessional. You used the completing offer to negotiate a higher salary (to your satisfaction, I believe), and in two week's time, now you have ...


31

For reasons, you can say something like Pursuing other career prospects outside of the company which is closer to my needs. You should not have to explain anything more. Would it be considered unethical? The fact that you are leaving during probation or you are quitting to go to a competitor may not be considered as unethical. However, you using ...


51

Depending on your location, the probation period may work both ways, in which case it would be well within your rights to make use of it and leave your current employment for greener pastures (and twice the salary is indeed greener). You'll always have the option to resign according to the terms of your contract or local laws. Employers often like to use ...


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