New answers tagged

0

should I be upfront and tell them that I feel that they lied to me about the position and I'm constantly bored or should I simply politely inform then that something better has come up? None. If you are set on leaving, do not have accuse them of lying. You also do not need to sound like a smug by indicating how boring their job was and finally telling them ...


0

Apply for places before you leave (I know that being in that situation can help me get in gear with what I want out of my new job). Then once you leave just explain the situation as you have put in here and go through their formal procedure.


1

A lot of folks here say you should document it. Document it with who? And what? Thus far you only talked to your manage who got second hand information. Doubtful you're going to talk to anyone else beyond that. In the future, use some sense. Ask yourself, "Why would an attractive woman follow me around a store and ask me random questions?" Does she like you?...


15

I have been in a similar situation quite a few years ago. I lasted 4 months with company X before I reached tipping point and called short on my probation. A few years later I was looking to switch jobs again (not out of choice this time) and the recruitment agent that was contracted by company Y insisted that my 4 month tenure with X looked bad on my CV ...


29

https://legalaidatwork.org/factsheet/fraud-or-misrepresentation-in-the-workplace/ "You may have a claim for fraud if your employer knowingly makes false promises of high salaries or guaranteed bonuses to persuade you to quit your former job..." In the interview of the new job, tell them the previous employment was fraudlent and that your mistake was not ...


136

It's only been 2 weeks... I'd argue that you don't have to mention this job at all. When asked why you're job searching you can explain why you left your previous position. If for any reason you can't omit a job from your work history no matter how short (locale, the type of job you're applying for, etc.), you can be honest without going into details: I'm ...


1

Going to propose the social route here: Talk to Bob. If you have any kind of personal relationship with Bob, then just have a word with him. Hey, so this is a confidential conversation as your friend, but the other day I noticed your CV on the PC...Are you thinking of leaving? Then, if they say yes: I understand how you feel and will be sad ...


3

You should always be prepared for new hires. People can leave your team for many reasons, some suddenly and beyond your control. Your responsibility to the product owner isn't necessarily a particular set of people but the resources to deliver. From your question, I don't see where you've simply asked Bob what's up. It's certainly not unusual to hate ...


9

All these make me think that Bob will soon leave the company You only think that. You don't know. Probably Bob doesn't even know himself, due to him being assigned a new project soon: Next month, we will have a product owner and work using Scrum framework and the team will also include Bob. This sounds a lot more professional than before. If the ...


-2

The fact is that you behaved unprofessionally. You claim that the seriousness of your misbehaviour has been exaggerated, but that does not change the fact that you have done something wrong. You should explain the facts of your interaction with this person in writing to set the record straight, and ensure that you do not make the same mistake in future.


5

You can certainly document the incident and explain things from your point of view, but there is absolutely nothing that the woman did that would justify you crossing that line. Your actions were entirely unprofessional at best, at worst they could be considered as sexual harassment. Based on the entire post, you're generally not happy with the company and ...


11

Be Careful In a broad sense just means that you need to chose your actions and your words very carefully from here on in, because senior management is now aware of you. Your manager is a bit lost to know what to do, which given the situation, is somewhat understandable. So the best they can offer you is a bit of a vague warning. If you know of specific ...


28

Honestly, I think you're asking the wrong question entirely. If Bob's work and knowledge are valued in the company at all, you need to look at the bigger picture and not just in the context of your team. Bob was promised a transfer, the company failed to deliver. Perhaps his patience is exhausted and he's looking to move to another company that follows ...


35

About an year ago, Bob requested to be transferred to our team because he was bored and did not like what he was doing. He was promised to be transferred in a few months, but a year has passed and nothing really changed. This is the only thing you are sure of: For a year Bob has wanted to switch jobs, he was promised a switch, but nothing happened. ...


148

Would you want a co-worker to alert management if they suspected you were leaving? The problem here is that you could really damage someone's career by precipitating his termination before he finds another job. Sadly, the job market is extremely harsh and "red-flags" any candidate who happens to be unemployed. It's just work, let it go, what's the worst ...


103

None of what you've stated is empirical evidence that Bob is planning on leaving. Additionally, none of this is your business. Should you inform the future PO that Bob may be leaving soon? No.


1

"No potential for growth" is probably your best bet. It's a realistic concern that any employee should have. It shows you consider your professional development a priority where some are happy to just middle out with a livable salary. It is a very palatable reason for a recruiter or hiring manager. It addresses the stagnation at your current employer without ...


0

If asked, just state that you want more challenge, as your current employer is nice to have offered you experience, but you are ready for a bigger adventure.


1

There are lots of options to describe this. Exactly as you described it here 'looking for better opportunities' 'no potential for growth' You can also say that you want to 'Work more with latest technology' etc


1

my employer is asking me to take VRS? If by VRS, you mean Voluntary Retirement Scheme, this is by definition "Voluntary" and your employer cannot "ask" you to take it. Here by "ask" I mean "force/order" you to take it. Regarding the benefits and other queries, this depends a lot on whether you are working in private/public/government sector and also in ...


0

The normal level is zero, and in many cases the legal level is zero. You have a duty of loyalty (“obligation de loyauté”) to your current employer. The law does not define this precisely — in fact it doesn't even use this expression except in a secondary clause, but there is considerable jurisprudence. I'm no expert, so I won't venture to say what this ...


8

Tell them immediately . They will not be happy about this, but it makes absolutely no sense to start there and resign right away. It's a lot of work to get a new employee into the system and it's better that you don't start at all. You should have told them as soon as you decided to go with Y. The earlier they know, the easier it for them to deal with this ...


1

I have decided to join Y how do I communicate this with X? Resign, giving the contractual notice of a week. Make sure you do this within the probation period and that you have got a signed contract for the job at Y (not just an offer of employment). When asked for a start date at Y, make sure its later than 1 week. Your resignation letter should say ...


-2

I realise this is no help to the OP now, but in case this is useful to anyone else having to leave behind a PC: 'Boot and Nuke' is a bootable image that secure wipes all harddrives on a PC: https://dban.org/ Burn it to a USB or disc, boot, confirm, and it'll start secure wiping the drives. Realistically, you can leave the PC after a few minutes as (...


0

I forgot to log out of my gmail, stack exchange network accounts, LinkedIn, work email and many other personal and professional accounts Generally speaking, you would not have been allowed access to the computer, which means you would not have been able to log out even if you had remembered. Under such conditions, someone should have accompanied you back to ...


-13

I have just retired and sold my manufacturing company. I have owned the company all but 2 years when I tried working for the man. I am in the USA, in Tennessee. This is based on legal advice, updated over the years. I can fire you for cause or no cause at all and with no warning at all. You work for the pleasure of the company. I don't advise anyone to ...


-3

If the works and the projects done by you need some responsibilities that later on might need to contact you using your contact information including email addresses, "NO, YOU CAN'T DO THAT." However, if your responsibilities are over and you have not signed any paper regarding your continuous availability to your previous responsibilities , "YES, YOU CAN ...


6

You should certainly change your passwords, but on most corporate setups accessing your personal accounts would take deliberate action bordering on malice, and assistance from IT staff. malice I assume you were logged on to your own user account, as is normal practice. This means that your browser history/saved logins can only be accessed by someone logged ...


50

If you're using Chrome and you've logged in with your gmail, you might be able to log out of all other browsers through the browser settings. Go to your Google synched account from the top right, and then go to Account Security. From there you can log out of all other devices. Then change your passwords immediately, or use a password manager addon to do it ...


135

Specifically Gmail you can log out remotely: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/8154 Sign out from another computer If you forgot to sign out of your email on another computer, you can remotely sign out of Gmail. Open Gmail. In the bottom right corner, click Details and then Sign out all other web sessions. Tip: If you’re using a public or ...


20

The browsers remember almost all of my personal passwords in future, do not do that. And only ever use private mode browsing at work, so as not to leave a history. Personally, I only ever visit Stack Overflow on my work PC, in private mode, and check my email at lunchtime on my 'phone. Doing otherwise might get you sacked at some places (and using ...


180

Go online and change all the passwords now for your personal accounts. Obviously the OP no longer has access to the work machine, so this means either using a machine at home or even going to an internet cafe or equivalent to log in to all accounts as necessary and change passwords. Work associated accounts like work email they will be able to, and have ...


4

if I leave there is no replacement; how to address this? You are already addressing it by putting in a two-week's notice, giving the company time to look for a solution. How should I tell my boss? As it may be hard to control one's feelings, there are certain points you can include that can help you with the conversation. 1. Thank them for the ...


6

Having no replacement is your company's problem, not yours. No reason to feel guilty about it. Even more so if the job is stressful and you don't get things you expected to get. Imagine you died. From a business point of view (except for the drama) this is the same as quitting, only without notice. Would you still feel guilty from beyond the grave that you ...


14

Short answer: You don't. It's not your problem and certainly not one of your making. Simply put, replacing you and your skillset is the responsibility of the organisation, not yours. If they haven't taken into consideration the Bus Factor, then this is a problem they will need to address. Don't take this responsibility on to yourself as it never was yours ...


6

It's a two-way street. Companies are looking out for themselves and you should do the same. The promises they made we're not kept and it is not your responsibility for the state of things before you leave. Ultimately management should have ensured more than one person could fill your shoes when you leave. Unless you have shares in the company you should give ...


18

"...the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech..." You have already spent much time and energy trying to assure that <the company I'm employed with> will continue to have a tech. Unfortunately <the company I'm employed with> refuses to coöperate. If your employer wants to have a tech working for them, it is their responsibility ...


120

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


33

I accepted the offer but I feel guilty since the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech. How should I tell my boss? There is no need to explain yourself or to feel guilty. It's your life and ultimately you have to look out for yourself and work in a place you get paid well and are comfortable. You just hand your notice period, serve it, and ...


0

Severance packages are designed to allow, or make, people leave quickly and / or quietly.


11

There are many reasons for this. One is that yes, it is in their contract. If I'm making a million a year somewhere and you ask me to give that up and come and work for you, and then it doesn't work out and I can't get things accomplished with the team and resources provided, so I have to leave, then I will get X as compensation for wasting my time and ...


2

If you work for your previous employer, even if unpaid, you may be in violation of your current employment contract. If you do so during the hours you're paid by your current employer, you most certainly are in violation of your current employment contract. You also need to consider liability, insurance requirements, and conflicts of interest caused by the ...


13

Be honest, be serious, be remorseful. You were dumb, and got seduced by a power fantasy. You were unnecessarily rude on your way out the door. You deliberately did things to burn that bridge, and now you're hoping to unburn it. At this point, your old boss (if he's still in the old position, if he has a position open) is going to have to ask himself if ...


6

I've been in this situation before, and I think the answer depends on two things: Do you have any interest in helping them and getting paid for it? How willing are you to cut them off and perhaps impact your relationship with them? For me, I was not interested in continuing to work for them at all, but I also wanted to remain on good terms for things like ...


4

I recently had a similar experience leaving a position. "Where is" questions I could answer off the top of my head were answered. Those requiring additional thought or creativity would get a.... I don't know, I'll think about it and let you know if I think of something. As for asking for consulting $$, personally I would not couple the request with a ...


24

Hi {Previous Boss}, It has been a pleasure to work for you and I would be happy to help with what you are asking about but unfortunately these requests are consuming more and more of my free time. If you would like then we can set up a time to meet and discuss an appropriate rate for continued consulting services. Best regards, Jean-Pierre If ...


1

The MD's wife started making rude comments to her indirectly, stating they are getting so many NP's for interview and it's very over whelming seeing so many job applicants as if they don't really care about her leaving and could be easily replaced. Answer: That is really good, just tell me if and when you need me to do the handover, I wish to make that ...


0

This will depend upon the local laws, but your friend may want to talk to an employment lawyer. There may be grounds for a harassment suit. It seems like it would be easy to prove, if their actions are considered harassment, given the publicity of their actions. Regarding that, I do not thing the "Bye Felicia" text would qualify as harassment. Immature, ...


5

Some minor things: If you have to give two months notice, it’s absolutely fine to offer leaving immediately or after two weeks - if the offer is accepted, it’s fine. And if you do that and they insist on two months, it’s because they need you. So if you don’t accept rude behaviour anymore but complain loudly, what can they do? Fire you? Not a good idea if ...


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