New answers tagged

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The problem I got is he wants me to resign before seeing the contract That seems backwards. I may be basing this on some experience I had, when I was the number two guy in a company (with no shares, though the owner had proposed something like that a bit earlier). The owner of the company ended up selling his company to another company which was probably ...


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When it comes to the shares be very wary of attaching much value to them (and much less to a mere promise of them). Here are some things to be aware of: You can't know anything about their value without knowing how many shares there are in total (and potentially who owns them), what rights attach to those shares and what limitations are put on you. For ...


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The problem I got is he wants me to resign before seeing the contract, No, first comes the term sheet. EDIT: Then, the ShareHolding Agreement. I'll admit, I didn't realize this one was so important until I read Alex Hayward's excellent answer. Then comes the contract, along with a vesting schedule. And then, and only then, comes the resignation. And ...


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Is that too much to ask? Not at all, rather they should be providing you with the written offer, before you ask. DO NOT, I repeat, do not resign until you have a signed and sealed contract / offer in your hands. There can be many reasons why your former boss cannot show you the contract before you resign - and none of the reasons are reasonable. This is ...


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he wants me to resign before seeing the contract That is a major red flag. It is absolutely professional to see contract before signing it, and I am not sure why your current employment would be a problem. If contract has NDA, this is independent issue. In general advice goes as following: You don't have a job until contract is signed. If you resign your ...


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A notice period is a formal minimum you need to give, if you have accepted another offer and all the paperwork has been completed etc there's nothing stopping you giving your notice now. This allows your current employer longer time to adjust and also helps them decide what work to give you now. The only downside I guess is they could potentially ask you ...


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Might need to put in a location but generally speaking in USA at-will worker the "graceful" thing to do is give a 2 weeks notice. For contracts and otherwise, you might need to give a more advanced notice. Generally a bad idea to tell the boss you're going to quit unless you already have a job on hand and ready to leave. They may let you go, even though ...


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My question is while I am leaving my currently working company they ask for KT(knowledge transfer) know. What do I need to present them? That depends on what the company needs. Sometimes, that is documentation. Sometimes, that is training your replacement. Often, it is both. Ask your boss what would help them the most. Then be helpful.


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Ask them what information they need. It's their responsibility to figure that out, not yours.


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Until you have handed in your notice, you are still working there and you should continue working there as normal - including taking any training you are asked to (so long as there are no strings attached with repayment etc.) The reality is, you do not know for certain that you will leave shortly - until you have actually tendered your notice. Perhaps the ...


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They always say don't let anyone know at your job if you are leaving as this can make work life difficult. Thank them, they are right. Continue as usual, until it's time to submit your resignation (i.e., you have a confirmed offer with you) and then, serve the notice period and leave. Till then, continue as usual, including accepting the salary, promotion, ...


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I work in Software Engineering, the mileage may vary for other industries. But for this job, generally, if knowledge isn't already adequately shared on an ongoing basis, possibly through documentation processes, then the knowledge transfers on someone's way out aren't going to do much good. You can be proactive, and other answers here are giving suggestions ...


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I will tell you my experience when leaving my previous job. I knew very well, even before the company / boss said anything, that some knowledge transfer had to be done. Actually, I was proactive and I started the discussion with the boss, he did not have a chance to tell me that it has to be done. We handled it in the following way: I had a discussion with ...


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We don't know anything about your job role or responsibilities, or your work areas. Ask you manager, they will be able to guide you. In general, the knowledge transfer includes (but not limited to): The work you have done and currently doing. Any details about the generic access / login that you used as part of your job. Process and practices. Any ...


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The monitors have built in, non-adjustable stands, so they sit another 6 inches above the desk so the bottom bezel of the monitor is pretty much at eye level. This causes neck strain because I'm looking up all day. This looks like an OSHA violation. If I'm reading [the OSHA documentation] right, the top bezel should be at eye level, not the bottom one. I'...


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Tell them for the benefit of others. They are unlikely to do anything about it, but there may be future similar complaints that force them to fix things. Do it for future employees; nobody should have to suffer in an unsuitable office environment. It won't really affect you as you are leaving (as others have noted), but it may help others.


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it was not a good fit, as I mentioned earlier. My body does not fit the workstation, I was going home with a lot of pain, and my doctor told me to stop immediately. It's too bad. I liked everything else about the company. That's what you say.


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It really comes down to the kind of relationship you have with whoever is doing the exit interview or the company. If you think they would be positively receptive to your comments and that it might help them improve themselves and maybe even be reflected positively in their future dealings with you, then tell them. If you think they'll feel like you're just ...


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Tell them the reason you're leaving; it's a solid reason, and that knowledge may help them prevent future employees from leaving. However - don't leave it at that. If you're going to be honest and deliver some bad news to them, you should also deliver good news. Make sure they know that you enjoyed everything else about the job, and single some items and ...


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The moment you decide to leave a job, their problems stop being your problems. If they ask "what can we do in future to make life easier for other people who work here?" that's an opening to give them some feedback about problems in their building. But you cannot fix their problems. So you have nothing to gain from offering unsolicited advice. They've ...


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I'd still say - do not go into details, give them a very generalized reason and move on. As you mentioned in another comment that when you wanted to discuss / report this issue, HR folks got angry, so most likely citing the same reason for leaving is not going to be taken positively and appreciated. There'e nothing for you to gain by providing any feedback ...


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I cannot make decisions for you, but if I were in your shoes, I would not think twice to resign and accept the offer from the previous company. The way I see it: There is no future for you in your current company. You need to search for a new job and move out as soon as possible, and in current scenario, you already have one offer from your previous company....


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You worked somewhere for 7 years without any of the management inflicted problems you now face. They have made you an offer seemingly without taking financial advantage of your situation, and stated that they will review your role later. It sounds like they really want you back and have found a workable solution. Grab the offer with both hands, but have a ...


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We can't answer this for it, it's ultimately up to you to decide. But we can offer advice and help you to ask yourself the right questions. Why did you leave your old job? What are your chances of finding a new job? Did you like your old company? If you liked your old company, my guess was that you moved for a raise? You said the new job doesn't have a ...


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I'm resigning for ergonomic reasons and ideally I want to explain this at the exit interview, so they know it's nothing personal, and hopefully they will take action for others if they see that someone is actually leaving over it. Since it's nothing personal, is it professionally safe to explain my ergonomic reasons or should I just keep it vague ...


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People do leave jobs and return to them, though that generally isn't pre-arranged. Here's what I suggest you do. First, go to your boss and tell your boss things about you, not about the job. Not "this job is too X" but "I need less X in my life at the moment." Not "it is too Y for me here" but "I need to reduce the Y in my life at the moment." If your boss ...


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I agree with everything already posted, but I'd like to say: You could try taking a vacation for however much time you have accrued. That's the closest you'll ever get to the scenario you're describing. Assuming the company doesn't say, "You can't take vacation time, this isn't approved," I'd say you could probably get ~9 days in a row or so to figure things ...


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I want to quit my job, take time to think, look at other jobs, and maybe get hired back if both me and my boss feel like it. How can I proceed? Quit your job. Take whatever time you need to think. Look at other jobs. Decide if you actually want to get hired back. If so, approach your former boss and ask if somehow the company wants to hire you back. ...


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There was no project, no job, no payment, no communication and no structure. What, exactly, would you be walking away from? Nobody else seems to really care. Talk to your teacher about your immediate plans, and concentrate on your studies for the near future. If you decide later to return to the project, you should treat it in a more structured way, with ...


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Is it reasonable, and if is, how can I do ? It's reasonable to you but the company has already given you their answer. They don't care enough to fix these issues permanently while you're there, why would they cave when you've left? Your best bet is, after securing an offer and giving your notice, to stress you're looking for an amiable exit, and that you'...


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No, "let's see other people" does not work on the workplace... except in places where that's explicitly regulated. For that to work, both sides of the equation need to benefit from it (which by the way is the same reason that doesn't usually work either on the other context), but in this case only you benefit from it. You basically want to leave your job ...


1

While you are working there is actually a good time to look for a new job. By the time you get an interview you will likely be at your current job 6 months, and that's long enough you can honestly say you gave it your best shot but it wasn't a good fit for you. Just be prepared to describe why you are leaving in positive terms, i.e. I prefer having more ...


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I don't see a problem as long as you're honest and not too negative about what you don't like in your current job. Presumably those factors won't be present at the place you're applying to - or why would you bother. Try to spin the differences in a positive way, i.e. I like small teams where I can do different things rather than I hate big teams where ...


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If I sum it up right, you were working in multiyear stints for smaller companies and now realized that working for The Big Shark Corp. is not your cup of tea. I suppose you know what upsets you in this position and hopefully you will be more sensitive to hints that show that new position would be similar. The interview(s) are there not only to assess you as ...


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Don't lie. There are several companies which ask for a Job Employment history form (which is obtained from the social services), in which you could easily ruin your chances. Just be honest, and tell them the reason on why you're leaving the company. Practically (depends where you're from), each job by law is given a 6-month probation in which you may ...


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Companies might think I left this big corporation, I might leave their company also Without any context, perhaps. So it's your job to give them that context. Interviewers are just people - if you tell them you tried the job, didn't like it for genuine concrete reasons, and decided to move on to something better, most will relate. It's a rare person who's ...


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Stay honest. Lying on an application only to be discovered later is not good. There is no shame in having a single short term job on your resume, as long as it is the only one. You gave it 5 months, it did not turn out the way you wanted, and you decided to leave. In my opinion, that is better than hanging in there for a year or two longer hoping things ...


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There is no reason to worry or lie about this. Just be honest and say you didn't feel the company was the right fit for you. There is nothing wrong with that. You have a good history and that is all that matters. I am responsible for going though resumes at my company, and 5 months wouldn't bother me because you have held a job for 4 years and others for 2 ...


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I had someone recommend that I completely leave this job off resume and simply tell potential recruiters/interviewers that I took some time off to travel and whatnot. I think that might look better than trying to explain why i left a big insurance company after 5 months. That someone gave you bad advice. You would be better off not lying. Imagine a ...


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how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat? By describing your goals, not your tactics. You'll likely be asked why you're going for the more senior position. Answer something like: I've been in {current role} for 2.5 years now. I've learned a lot, and I feel ...


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There is no value to be had for you to tell them that you will leave if you are not promoted. It just sounds like you are trying to determine how important you are to the organization. If they are not doing a good job keeping good people, they likely are not concerned with individuals in general. If they aren't attempting to keep the people you trust, you ...


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My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


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My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You don't need to convey anything about leaving at this point. Follow the sequence below: Ask for what you believe you're worth of (promotion, salary revision etc.). Start finding other opportunities when ...


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is quitting the job the right decision? No. They’re offering you a great opportunity to learn an interesting new area which will significantly enhance your career and your earning potential.


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I don't believe AI will ever be needed as an average web developer. The truth is most web developers will just use libraries or services to enable AI without really knowing what it is. You certainly wont need to know the science/maths behind it. However, you have been given an opportunity to learn one of the hottest topics currently in the tech industry. ...


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There are some excellent answers already given, however I was in a similar situation as what you are, 3 years ago. Web developer title unfortunately is a broad term and incorporates lot of technologies. It can be frontend with something like React or backend with Django/Node/Java or even .NET. It can also demand some knowledge of deployments/dev ops etc. ...


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I have 1.4 year experience in web development both on front-end and back-end. So you are a very junior software developer. Perhaps just a code monkey (and these are risking their job a lot more than genuine software developers, because by definition they are easily replacable; the economical value of software is concentrated on software design aspects, and ...


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Something else to consider: Often in web development they really using mean machine learning when they are asking for AI. If that is the case here (I would discuss with your management if you are unsure), that absolutely falls within the purview of Web Development, so I would definitely advise going for learning it as it will certainly benefit you going ...


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We see this in all aspects of IT / IS industry. Companies want to test-drive data science, so they opt for one of two ways: 1) post job ad for a data scientist, but call it "Python Developer" or "Data Analyst".. and then lump 3 job roles into it (DBA, Analyst, Scientist), and offer them $50k 2) tell some tech person at work to go "learn data science".. ...


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