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0

When I worked as a Manager at a large multi-national firm the HR system literally had a box to check "Would you re-employ this person yes or no", finding good employees is hard - making clear you know the position should circumstances change is a very sensible thing.


1

Is this true of every software development job? If I left a job at Amazon or Google, would they "save my spot" in case I wanted to come back later? This is much different interpretation of what "door is always open if I ever want to come back?" One is saying they're going to save your position whereas the other is saying you're leaving ...


0

Is it common for a workplace you are leaving to say “the door is always open”? Whether it's common or not, does not really matter, it might be a cultural thing, it might be a personal note. What matters are: If you're leaving the company on good terms (without burning bridges) If you feel that it was / is a good workplace to be in If the company sees value ...


2

It's true of many jobs in many fields, if you leave on good terms and skilled people are hard to find. Keep in mind that finding an employee normally requires: running ads or paying recruiters doing lots and lots of interviews when you find someone, training them in the way your company works, which might take months finding a good spot for that person, ...


5

They don't save a spot but you can come back more easily. Google has it so that you can come back within a year, so the spot isn't guaranteed, but if they regretted you leaving you will have a very easy time returning. My prior organization would probably slot me into first place if they had a spot open and I wanted to return. Software development everywhere ...


10

No company is going to "save your spot", but if you're a good employee, are productive, positive, have created goodwill, and are leaving on good terms then it makes sense to me that they might extend an open door to your return. Why not? This is going to vary by company but it doesn't strike me as unusual, unorthodox, or suspect.


1

Simple answer: "The two(!) of you need to talk!!" Rip down the barriers to communication. Present your issues (from "perspective #1") to this other-person ... who is actually not your adversary at all ... who necessarily holds and represents "perspective #2." Now, between the two of you, "hash it out." Both your ...


5

You ask: Do they want me to leave? I ask: Does your decision depend on what they think? Why does it matter? To elaborate, if you feel your contributions are repeatedly getting neglected and you're being a subject of indirect discrimination (or negative favoritism), you should already look for a new job. Remember, do not wait until the company (or your boss)...


9

It's not possible to read your bosses mind, but it looks like he's retaining a staff member for some reason even though he has no work at the moment. This is often a budget concern. He may have a staff budget that he needs to use or may ultimately lose in the next budget allocation. Or you can just take it at face value that the project is not ready yet. If ...


2

Yes, you can resign during your probation period. In doing so you can also ask if there is another suitable role you could fill. You can always ask - the worst case scenario is they say "no". If you decide to go this route, word your resignation to highlight how it is with great regret you feel compelled to resign, how you greatly admire the ...


5

Could I resign from this role during my probation? Yes you can, you are free to resign or quit whenever you want if you feel it's the best thing. If you are on probation then that would be ideal time to quit rather than wait more time and quit when on a more permanent position. This is one of the main purposes of probation periods, so you and the company ...


1

Note: This answer is based on the relationship between an ex-employee and an ex-employer and is not legal advice, except inasmuch as directly stated. For legal advice, ask a lawyer. You are not an employee of the company anymore. They are not paying you. You have no duty to help them with anything. They know you are not working for the company anymore, ...


0

I'm not a laywer, but here's my view of the legal situation you are in. Accessing protected data without permission is a legal offense in most countries. This includes using a login data you'd expect not to work. It doesn't matter if you try a single password you know or guessed, or brute-force using an online password list. Therefore, admitting you have ...


1

Following steps will make sure that you act ethically and at the same time will not give your ex company any opportunity to complain in case they are looking for one: Understand that this situation is caused by your ex-company's less than stellar employee off-boarding protocols Do NOT mention this to anyone officially or otherwise especially as you are ...


5

So let me get this straight. You and your coworkers knew about this security flaw when you were still working for them, but nothing was ever done about it. Now you think that if you tell them now that you're gone and working for a competitor, that they will magically get their act together and fix this flaw. Your thinking doesn't make sense. If I were you, I ...


8

You are not a penetration tester and you have not been hired to test their systems. As of the time you left, you are a stranger to them. Look at how other companies have dealt with uninvited security analyses of their systems. Sometimes it works out fine. Sometimes lawyers get involved. Although in an ideal world, you should tell them immediately, we live in ...


2

Are there any reasons why I should let the company know? It's ethical to tell. But it's also unethical for you to be snooping on your former employer. You could anonymously report some security flaws in a way that doesn't put the focus on you snooping where you shouldn't have. Are there any risks if I don't signal that to them? Sure. Somebody else could ...


13

Mind your own business and CYA Strictly speaking, if you accessed systems of your previous company, you have most likely broke the law. Situation is akin to selling someone a house with numerical lock code on doors. New owner may not change the combination, but that does not mean you have the right to enter your former home. You would have to consult legal ...


2

"Are there any reasons why I should let the company know?" Yes. Because you should have let them know before you left the job, if you saw it as an issue. I don't intend to impugn your skills with the following scenario; management can be resistant and ignorant and it might not be your fault. But, there must have been other employees who quit. Were ...


130

There's the sad principle that no good deed ever goes unpunished :-( There are companies sadly that would lawyer up against you as soon as you say that you managed to access any data that you shouldn't have accessed. If you have the slightest inkling that your company is one of those, then you write them by registered mail to demand that they remove all your ...


0

At the same time I noticed that I still have reading access to the company's systems. Among other, I can see its financial results - data that I definitely shouldn't see anymore. Of course, I won't be checking this data, have no interest in them, but still. And yet, you're checking this data. Stop. Immediately. Inform your previous company. End.


80

Are there any reasons why I should let the company know? Because you are a good person and a professional. And because if you were still with the company and another IT department head had left, you'd appreciate the same courtesy.


7

Are there any reasons why I should let the company know? Yes, you should let them know because you've done something that may or may not be illegal, more so you are now working to a direct competitor of that company which tends to make the situation problematic on few more levels. Are there any risks if I don't signal that to them? Certainly. If the ...


13

The simplest solution would be to send a friendly email to ask them if every procedure which needs to be done for you leaving the company has been carried out an if everything is alright or if they need you for any further action. If possible attach your own personal checklist and mark the things which you can legitimately know to be done as "done"....


32

In my opinion you need not tell them and at the same time you should stop checking their data. You're no longer working for them and working for their direct competitor. So, if you inform them about this they may think you're accessing (or have accessed) their sensitive data. It can make a bad image about your current company as they'll think you're ...


1

Regarding what your boss is doing: If you believe it rises to the standard of libel, then you should speak to a lawyer. If you do not, then leave it alone. Those who know you, know you, and those who don't, don't. If the people who were willing to offer you recommendations knew you properly, then they should still be willing to offer you references (this ...


3

I wouldn't do this. You highly underestimate the probability that they will find some cause to fire you for. If they look hard enough, they will find one, or else they will simply make one up that will be hard for you to fight in court. Have you ever delivered something late? Has there ever been a single bug in your code? Have you ever disagreed with ...


0

Rules of thumb when serving your notice: :) HR is not your friend. Do not sign anything, unless you get a clear and substantial consideration upfront Anyone that knows you will continue to know you as you are and no defamatory emails will sway them If you can, save boss`s badmouthing emails and talk to a employment lawyer for potential defamation of ...


6

First, look after yourself. If your colleagues are laid off, and then you give notice, there are two possibilities: Either your employer says "oh ____" and has to scramble to hire your colleagues back; at that point your ex-colleagues will have very strong cards in their hands and if they are clever, they will benefit (guys, feel free to post here :...


1

IMHO, you got to look for the number 1 - you. I would NOT suggest to say anything before all your cards in play. It is not your job to safeguard this employer from bad faith damage he did to you and going to do to other senior engineers As you stated, its been a year and a half since you cared for this employer :)


8

I think your post is quite long, so first I want to summarize it to the essentials. Soon you will leave your current employer for a position elsewhere. You have been told that soon some other employees will be laid off, some of them are friends of yours. By announcing/hinting early that you are leaving you can prevent that (some) of those other employees ...


5

If you tell them that you're planning to leave by a certain date, then that's the equivalent of a voluntary resignation. And if they fire you early, you may still be owed severance (or even owed unemployment benefits), but you may only be owed money for the period of time between the time you got fired and the actual time you said you'd leave, or perhaps, ...


48

You should always manage your own career. Do NOT try to manage the careers of others. Stay long enough to get your bonus(es). You've earned them. You do NOT owe your current employer anything beyond the 3-week notice. It was their job to retain you. They failed. When you put in your notice, if they are intelligent at all, they will reach out to anyone ...


2

The unfortunate reality is that all you really stand to gain by giving advance notice is a good recommendation from your current employer in the future. You have much more to lose. A good manager would appreciate the advance notice and work to secure your final bonus, but this may or may not succeed depending on the overall company financial position, your ...


1

You are overthinking this. Do not worry about some nonsense your boss is telling some random employee, it is meaningless. Do not send an email on the work network unless it is work related, and this is definitely not work related. If you have a personal relationship with other employees and have their personal contact information, then send a personal email, ...


0

Machine Learning is coming. You should get ready for it. There is a current trend in the ML field to make the tools easier to use, to the point where many more developers can easily whip up a model and apply it. Examples of somewhat recent software includes SciKit-Learn and Keras which turn a lot of ML algorithms into simple to apply libraries. And then more ...


4

Should I send a pre-emptive "farewell, and here's my reasons It is better to not put any reasons for leaving when the actual reason is your boss/company. This won't do much good. As Stephan said, a positive generic feedback is the best option. However, if you want to convey your colleges of your contributions to the company, you can highlight some of ...


12

Talk to a lawyer and/or union representative ASAP. I'm not familiar with Canadian law, but what your boss does might cross into libel or other types of defamation. It might also be actionable on other grounds. A letter from a lawyer can also make THE COMPANY send a retraction of those accusations to everyone, which is a million times more valuable than ...


2

What should I do now as they are showing my last day as 15+7 = 22 days and it will be a trouble for me as I have joined another company on 16th day. You should contact your former company and ask them to amend the date (HR or your former manager would be ok). You may also want to bring to their attention the extra payment you received, so they can explain ...


99

they will only provide the papers in-person, and not via e-mail, for some odd/nefarious reason). It doesn't matter. When they give it to you, just say that you need your lawyer to review it. And of course, do not sign it. Do not sign anything. Also, refuse any extension and refuse any exit interview. so my new job (was able to line one up with a cloud ...


5

Talk to HR. Make it clear that a) You get emails from the team where the team expresses understanding, and that while you won't actively push for a negative impression of the company in a team with an already high turnover rate, you also will not lie to you former team members b) That you are going to take a lawyer if things don't go reasonable HR is not ...


61

Should I send a pre-emptive "farewell, and here's my reasons (because my boss is unethical)" e-mail to the teams that will be impacted in the new year? No. The people who know you and know your work already know the truth and won't be swayed by your boss' email. The people who don't know you and don't know your work won't be swayed by your email. ...


0

I was in a very similar situation in the past, when I was resigning from a job thinking that I'm still in the probation period with 1 month notice, while in fact I missed the deadline and had to serve a 3 month notice. I had a new job lined up and was planning to start in exactly 1 month. I couldn't negotiate a shorter notice period, so the only thing I ...


1

Any suggestions on how I salvage this situation? How likely is it the other company will withdraw the offer at this point? Contracts have been signed but the mistake is mine not theirs. This situation breaks down to how willing are you to go back on your existing contract in order to secure the new job as in the UK there is no slavery anymore and if you ...


4

If your currently employer didn't notice this, then you can simply confirm with them that the resignation good. Do this on email so you push back later if they try to change their mind Hi Boss, just double checking in with you that everything is ok with my resignation? Anything else you need from me? If your employer does notice this with you promoting ...


4

Try negotiating a shorter notice period with your current employer. It's tough for even the most professional employee to remain focussed and productive for a 3 month notice and it can be a bit demotivating for a team knowing that one of their colleagues is just going through the motions. I manage a team who have long notice periods like this and have ...


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