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7

Have you considered thanking the CEO for his consideration and informing him that you would love to work with him again in the future? If you stay in touch, you can always return a few years after the reorganization. If you are remembered well, you'll have a much better bargaining position. I suspect that you feel conflicted about leaving, because you had ...


3

While career advice is not encouraged on this site, I can give my perspective. If they valued you, they should value you when you were staying. Now they are only trying to reduce attrition which will look bad on them. Even if you stay, there will be unspoken tension that you got your promotion as an attempt to hold you back and they may try to compensate at ...


5

Yes you can stay. If your current employer agrees, you can withdraw your notice and continue your employment. Your new company will be disappointed when you inform them you will not be starting with them after all. They'll only be disappointed though, not angry; candidates sometimes accept counter-offers so they'll understand your position. You should be ...


0

Some ideas are really dumb, and this happens to be one of them. It isn't necessary, it isn't appropriate, and it isn't "cute." Do you really need to send a "see ya" email to anyone at all?


10

In the UK, by law you have to give one week notice if you worked with the employer for up to two years, after two years it increases by one week for every year. If you have a contract, the notice period for both sides is usually longer. If you haven't been given a contract yet, the notice period by law would apply, so one week. If you want to leave and they ...


1

I do notice a slight culture shift in how workplace conduct generally occur. At my current employer, using meme seems to be common practice since in MS teams you can post the meme. However, I would be careful about what sort of meme you use. In the sample you gave the first one about stealing office supplies and the last one about burning the place down ...


1

The key principle here is to BE PROFESSIONAL as you leave. That means you don't send such memes or ranting emails or anything of that nature. Don't even send a blast email because most people at the company don't care that you're leaving and probably don't even know you. If you have had a close working relationship with a few coworkers, you might send a ...


4

Read the room Personally, I'd never send an email containing a meme. I expect my son wouldn't see a problem with it. I'd say it's "advisable" to share a meme if you know it will be received in the way you intended, and for no other reason. You never know when you will encounter someone in the future who worked at an old company you also worked for, ...


3

Depending on the exact contents of what you send, you could be opening yourself up to a world of hurt doing something like this. Take your third image for example. What exactly are you trying to imply with it? Because it would be very easy to read that as saying that you've sabotaged something, or failed to do proper handover, and you're expecting the place ...


3

Generally speaking: If you would include such a thing in a regular email if this was not your last day, go ahead. Your last day doesn't make it special. But if you wouldn't and you just consider it because it's you last day? Don't. Your last day doesn't make it special. It's the last day. So it's still a day at work. Be professional to the normal standards ...


3

No Unless for some reason you happen to be fourteen and the company you're leaving happens to be exclusively staffed by other fourteen year-olds. Rubbish like this from fourteen year olds is not any better of course - it's just people will accept that they perhaps don't know any better and will cut them some slack. The content of all the given examples ...


10

It really depends on everything. The actual meme, the person that's leaving, and the remaining colleagues. In the first meme, if the person was actually reprimanded for theft, that's just the dumbest thing to say on the last day. However, if the guy is known to be a real stickler for not stealing supplies, then it might work, depending on their colleagues. ...


0

For instance if I was to leave without fulfilling my notice period or did not adhere to a ‘non compete’ aspect, is it likely that UK employment law would favour my employer? If those sections in your contract say something like "Details of the non-compete rules are in the employee handbook", and that handbook does not exist (or was never shared ...


13

If you want to get advice specific to your situation, the Citizen's Advice Bureau would be the place to go in the UK. Broadly speaking, the fact that an employment contract refers to a non-existent employee handbook in one section has no impact on other sections. If there is a section in the employment contract that talks about the dress code and refers to ...


1

There aren't many universal rules in UK businesses. Some offices have a lot of celebrations, cakes/sweets are brought in a lot (to mark different occasions), while others will let things pass almost unnoticed. Bringing in food If it's a place where people often bring in cakes/sweets, etc, you may want to bring something in for everyone. But equally there are ...


4

It may not be strictly expected, but people always appreciate when you get your round in. I would definitely buy a round. Other than that just be nice and enjoy a few drinks. Have worked in the UK and elsewhere.


8

I've been to a few of these in the UK. There is no expectation of you buying drinks over and above what you would normally do. (In general if someone else sets up a pub visit you are not expected to be the main buyer). Behave like you would with any other group of colleagues. People may buy drinks for you - accept them nicely if they do, without drinking ...


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