Hot answers tagged

13

If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. There is no ethical way out of the situation except withdrawing the application, or providing a corrected CV with explanation - since you are objectively at fault here. If your explanation and apology is sincere, the employer may even give you a chance and decide to proceed. Any other solution involves more lying,...


11

Is there any way for me to be honest with them, or resolve the situation without being knocked out of consideration for the job? There's an easy way to be honest with them. Write your own CV, using only truthful information. Give it to the interviewers. If asked, explain the discrepancies. If asked, don't make excuses, admit that it was a stupid mistake, ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


9

The point of software development is to develop working software that has value. "Coding to the spec" and "not willing to drag others along" are not valued attributes. Half-finished features have no value. Features blindly coded to a bad spec have no value. If you're given a spec that has problems and you're the only one who realizes that, your ...


6

Before we answer your question, you need to ask yourself a few questions: What kind of job are you applying for? What specific skills or knowledge are required for that job? Does X help an employer evaluate my skills against their requirements? Sometimes, even if X isn't directly listed in the job requirements, telling an employer that you posses skill X ...


6

Match the first language in the job ad I haven’t lived in Montreal, but I have interviewed for software jobs there. As a rule, a place seems to primarily English if the English comes first in the job ad. They didn’t ask if I spoke French. It always came up when the French came first. Or, if you have solid proficiency in both languages, check which one is ...


5

When applying to software development jobs in Montreal, is it best to use an English resume, French one, or to include both versions? If you see the ad in other language than English, or the job posting mentions the requirement of knowing other languages that English and you happen to be comfortable / proficient in that language, why not attach both the ...


5

I've been a part of several large-scope, big-budget projects over the past few years, and although I've always referenced my contributions, successes, challenges faced, etc. I've never provided screenshots, code, or anything else to prospective employers. And I do not think I will ever start doing so: First of all, my former employers, most of whom I'm ...


4

This answer isn't just for "old languages" but basically for any skill. If it is a skill you have, if that's relevant to the job you want, list it in your resume. If it's an irrelevant skill, a skill you don't want to use anymore (do you want to develop in Visual Basic?), remove it. So, if you're aiming for a Java Software development job and you dont ...


4

You're overthinking this - and focusing on the wrong aspect of the cover letter. There is no magic opening line or phrase that's going to get you the job, people are generally looking to hire someone who can do the job not someone who writes a gimmicky cover letter after mainlining a thesaurus. Concentrate on making sure that your cover letter and CV/...


4

As an example... Company C: Bottlewasher from November 2016 to October 2019 Responsibilities: 1 2 3 Achievements: 1 2 3 Company B: Bottlewasher from August 2015 to November 2016 Responsibilities: 1 2 3 Achievements: 1 2 3 You may want to reference Company A within the responsibilities or achievements sections respectively, or not.


4

The fact that you were terminated? No. Just don’t include it. Nobody will assume that after holding a position for 17 years that you were terminated for poor performance. Unless you are a champion hide and go to meetings player.


4

The usual method is that the team assigns points to tasks, and then team members pick up whatever tasks they like. If you somehow manage to get too many points assigned to your task, I'll pick it up and look good :-) But really that's not going to happen with scrum done properly, because all the other members figure out that the points are inflated. If you ...


3

You completely edited your question, which was about a recruitement agency doctoring your CV. Note that anybody who has given a good number of useful answers here can see the original. My advise is to restore it as it was. Note that many people here, including me, could restore your question, but it's better for your reputation to do it yourself. In this ...


3

Why do you think it's a big problem? You're a PhD dude. How can they tell you "Well, you spent 6 years in the highest, most rigorous academic program afforded to you, but OH---here's this gap I know nothing about, you must not be motivated!" Bull-oney. Don't explain. If they ask, tell them exactly what you said here. That's academia in a nutshell.


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


3

So which format should I use? I suggest you contact this company and ask if they have a specific resume format they expect. Then you can see if you need to adapt yours. If you are unable to get this information, it would make more sense to use the Germany format, as their offices are located there (and is where you will be working if accepted) even though ...


3

Just put the name of the company as it was when you were hired. Whatever name changes, mergers, splits, etc. occurred after you were hired don't matter as it relates to your work experience. It has nothing to do with you and it's not a reflection on you or your work experience. If your job, or title, or duties changed as a result of any of this activity ...


3

You have a couple of answers about how you should do this on a resume but I think the fact that you're asking about LinkedIn changes the advice since ideally your entry for your current job will link to your current company. Assuming both entities have a LinkedIn presence that is well maintained by the company, I would use the most recent version of child ...


2

The most important is to provide the name of the company the same as it was when you worked there. If the company changed its name, and you want to show this, you might write: COMPANY_A, named COMPANY_B since (date) or COMPANY_A, part of COMPANY_B since (date) It is mostly irrelevant if the name changed WHILE you worked there, or AFTER. You are not ...


2

Historically, almost all hiring would be managed and reviewed locally, even with an international organisation. I would say that this would still be the majority case where a local branch doing the hiring. This is because the local branch is familiar with their own culture and needs. So, I would assume that it is the local branch reviewing and deciding on ...


1

"I know that this is going to be a big problem for securing a job." "From conversations with friends and acquaintances who have been employed since their undergrad or masters, they unanimously conceded that a year of gap is a red flag in hiring. I don't have any concrete evidence." Do not listen to them. I have had a good 4.5 yrs of career break and now I ...


1

There is no clear way out of this situation The internship where you were terminated is something you could have gotten away with because the company was willing to help you there. The grades you will only get away with if they don’t not check. And frankly, if the recruiter advised you to lie about them, there is a decent chance that they won’t. A guy I ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


1

I would choose the format based on the name of the recipient. If it's a german name, the german format would probably suit them better. By the way, naming hobbies is pretty outdated for german applications by now, so you can leave those out if you prefer. The picture is most important.


1

It can be applicable even if the job you're applying to does not need it, depending on how you spin it on the interview. You can present yourself as someone willing to adapt to whatever the company wants and needs at any given time. My favorite saying is "If the company wants me to do C++, I will do C++... and if tomorrow they want me to do D--, I will ...


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