Hot answers tagged

105

Just keep it simple: 2020: off work due to a health issue which is now resolved 2018 - 2019: Senior Widget Wrangler, Acme Corporation <description of senior widget wrangler role> 2016 - 2018: Widget Wrangler, Acme Corporation <description of widget wrangler role> Nobody should ever be asking for details of the health issue, but if someone does ...


76

Phillip Kendall’s answer is the correct, here is why. Unfortunately you have a tricky trade-off. On one hand, you are not required to explain anything and the company can't really ask (in the US). On the other hand the company is not required to hire you and if there is anything in your resume or the interview they don't like, they will just move on to the ...


19

What could you lose? Time. What could you win? A job you dream of. It could look very appealing for the employer, that you are so motivated and passionate about the position, and throw in your application again. Finding passionate (intrinsically motivated) people is rare. Personally, I would call you and ask why. Because there must be a good reason.


9

A resume should be a brochure, not a biography. The only purpose of a resume is to pique the interest of an employer enough to get an interview. The interview is where you go into the details. I wouldn't bother going into that much detail.


9

Cover letter is not the place for this. Everything in your application should be positive. I also don't want to be 'complaining' about my previous employer to someone who I've never even met I wouldn't even do this in an interview if I were you.


9

Internal references usually carry a lot of weight. At least for getting through the screening stage. I’d say it’s well worth giving it another shot. What have you got to lose?


6

I have taught both resume writing and job hunting strategies, here's the traditional wisdom: Don't chase trends. Eventually, they fall out of favor and count against you. Be prepared to tweak your resume to fit the job for which you are applying. While "trendy" resumes will get attention, they are just as likely to get bad, as good attention. A ...


6

Be open about what happened. That builds trust. You don't have to be it every time but if you find an offer interesting, tell them what happened. I interpret your question as it wasn't something "shameful" (being hospitalised for a year after a car accident due to DUI would, in my eyes, be shameful because it would signal really bad judgement - but ...


5

A close friend of mine had to stop working for a few years because of health issues. When everything was resolved and she started looking for a job, she didn't update her resume. Instead, she explained the gap during interviews by saying "I had to stop working because of health issues, but now I'm completely healthy and ready to work again". From ...


5

"Trained cross-functional team on computer science topics and product use" Two job req. buzzwords: train and cross-functional team.


4

I'm not so satisfied with where I currently work. I'm a software engineer from country A, and I'm currently working abroad for a company in country B. This company, which has some really nice people working at it, is really really old in terms of the technology stack. No git, no unit tests, no Jenkins, no CI/CD. The most cutting edge technology they have is ...


4

Easy: "I'm a company that really needs a really good graphic designer – if I can find one." Okay, sales(wo)man, "there's your prospect." You know that you've got what they're [desperately ...] looking for. In fact, you know that you're better than everyone else they might be considering! Your objective is simply: "to convince them ...


4

Personally I wouldn't even include it on the resume. I would just put in the work you did and just the time you did it in. Don't explain "gaps" between those time frames. You're right to assume people will be curious, but you have to also understand that when you're being vague and lacking any sort of clarity, people will assume the worst possible ...


3

It certainly depends on the location, but I (as in "if I was in that situation") would be completely open about that. I would put 2020: off work due to a health issue which is now resolved (to use Phillip's example) and, then during the interview, at the slightest hint of a question, I would openly say that it was cancer, it is now all good and I ...


3

Your resume should be a summary of your skills, experience, and accomplishments. It should not be an exhaustive list of every task or project you worked on.


3

You should make sure to check with your friend if they're okay with using their name in your message. If it's okay, briefly mention it at the start of the email like this. Dear [HR Person Name], [Friend] provided me with your contact details, and I'm writing you to inquire about an internship at [Company Name]. ... The usefulness of this differs depending ...


3

Don't do it. I've seen people use star ratings and other numbering schemes, but these are pointless since they're so subjective. I know that you're a graphic designer, but you should really keep your resume layout simple for computers. Many times, you'll have to cut and paste the text of your resume into a web form, and at other times, your resume will be ...


2

For a resume, generally the standard format is one page. In this case, experience can generally be added or omitted, since the resume should be tailored to the specific job that one is applying for, anyway. But for a CV (at least from the ones I've seen by academics), it is generally supposed to contain all information regarding experience. In the case of ...


2

In my field, a five page resume would be absolutely unheard of. Three pages would be considered very long. One page would be typical for a junior level position and two for a senior position. But if you've determined that for someone in your field and your experience level, the norm is three to five pages, then I'd suggest stick to the short end of the ...


2

I would greatly appreciate any thoughts or input on this for a young job seeker, thanks! It's really difficult and "nerve-racking" submitting applications! I would not want to disqualify myself by attaching a CV when they ask specifically for a resume The good news is YOU WILL NOT DISQUALIFY YOURSELF. You're OK. It is really hard to know ...


2

I'm conscious that they might just assume that I'm applying for jobs because freelancing hasn't worked out, or because it's too much of a struggle in the pandemic. And what's wrong with that? Do you think that's a negative thing? Do you think that they think that's a negative thing? There's nothing wrong with telling them that you tried freelancing, that it ...


2

It might matter depending on what jobs you are applying to. If you're applying for something that involves artistic work, such as some sort of graphics designer role, than having something visually distinct could help demonstrate your skills and this could help. Having a resume that stands out might be good, but you also want it to be easy to read. And it's ...


2

How much do recruiters/hiring managers look for something like foreign language proficiency? Obviously, it depends. It depends on the specific foreign language, the company, the customers, the workforce, the personal preferences of the interviewers, etc. In general, if proficiency in a foreign language were required, it would be specifically mentioned in ...


1

I found an internal connection to the company (an old colleague) which I can use as an internal reference in my new application. In fact, they dedicated a specific reference field in their online application form. So, it is important to them. Tell your contact what happened. Tell them that you're still interested. Ask them for their advice. If your old ...


1

As @sascha's answer points out, what do you have to lose? My only issue is that we have no way of knowing if they will spot that you have applied before. Possibly they won't but possibly they will and rather than think you have a good reason for applying again, they may assume you are blindly spamming out applications or they may just assume they had a good ...


1

On my resumes I usually just say "assisted in the development and maintenance of tools to do [whatever]". If the interviewer has specific questions they can ask! I mean, I've been at my current job for six years. If I were to list every individual task that took half a day or more it'd be a 100 page resume that'd need a table of contents and an ...


1

Have a set of "boilerplate" paragraphs that you can insert, then choose which ones to actually use in each job that you are applying to. State in the opening that the resume is not intended to describe "a continuous chronology of time." Speaking from experience, people look over a resume only for a few seconds. This is therefore a sales ...


1

I would keep it simple without trying to make it sound like more than it was. Something like created automation tool for XYZ and composed and implemented the procedures and end user training. This might be dependent on locale, because that's the normal terminology here, the buzzwords in other answers are unknown to me and sound like pretentious sales spiel ...


1

The form doesn't perfectly match the instructions, that's for sure. The point is to show whether you have Exposure to the field of AI research as demonstrated by research projects, university coursework, or self-guided study. Some of this should be clear from what you put in the Education History and College Transcripts fields. If you have a CS degree with ...


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