Hot answers tagged

101

On your resume, and when asked, you should never provide any of this detail. Your resume should focus on the good things you accomplished there. When asked why you are leaving, tread carefully. No-one will listen to the entire story, which sounds hard to believe, just because of the sheer length. Yet a very short answer like "it was a toxic environment" ...


91

This isn't a problem. I cannot imagine anyone caring. You had the same employer, same job title. Just worked in a different "office" and under a different supervisor. Unless you wanted to highlight having more jobs or the difference between the jobs, merging them makes perfect sense and declutters your resume. It doesn't matter if it is a new contract ...


42

The way you mentioned it, I read it as an honest mistake where you missed to clarify the job details, it should not be a deal breaker for you. Unless there was an explicit criteria that you matched by mistakenly combining the job details - I do not see this to be a problem. You can do two (both) things: Update the resume with the correct details and send a ...


29

Generally speaking, you don't. When asked, you speak in a general sense about troubles about the company: "I found management had problematic relations with employees and vendors"... and if they are attuned to the industry, you won't be telling them anything they don't already know. That is, in fact, the crux of the matter and what they should be ...


26

Just because you were on leave, doesn't mean you stopped working for the company. It's still N years. If you really must mention it "I worked for company X and did great job, in spite of overcoming a serious illness", then do so, but you'll make the interviewer really uncomfortable. I think you're worrying over an inconsequential and missing the big ...


11

As someone who will be going through a series of internships in the next few years, how can I capitalize on this? How can I phrase a request to my supervisor for them to; put an endorsement on my linkedin, or write a paragraph that I can put in a longform CV I make available to employers I apply to? And what sorts of things should I ask my ...


10

Why would you include two sections about experience? Simply include one and call it "Experience". If you're applying for an entry-level position, it's expected that you may not have much, if any, experience in the field you are applying for - that's why it's an entry level job. However, any work experience can demonstrate your ability to function in a ...


10

Well, he CAN, but I'm not sure why he would, it's still an achievement and if he omits it someone will ask "Why do you have X years where you did nothing?" and that's not a pretty look either. I suspect however that it does not hurt his chances (Not more than not being there at least) and I think he/you need to go over his resume and brush it up. Without ...


10

As very well noted in other answer and comment, talk to your potential manager ASAP. Do not wait until your meeting next week. Be prepared that confessing about the lie will most likely lead to disqualification. Good that you are planning on confessing, better to do it before the company starts the background check and approach your school. I'm not sure ...


10

You don't need to feel uncomfortable about stating that you worked there N years. Your sick leave happened within your employment. If you had taken annual leave, maternity leave, caregivers leave, whatever leave, it doesn't change when you started employment and when you ended employment with that company. Nobody is expecting you to deduct leave. It is ...


8

Anything you believe is relevant to the job you're applying for should be in your resume. If you think you'll be dealing with foreign clients in your new job, then you should state it. If it's a job where you won't be dealing with foreign clients just briefly mention it and leave it at a mention. Your resume should show everything you can do whilst showing ...


8

You can ask your colleague for a note on LinkedIn now, and ask him/her to be a long-term reference at the end of your internship. Recommendations belong in recommendation letters or personal conversations between recruiters and past colleagues - not on your resume. If you feel comfortable, there's no reason to delay asking for a LinkedIn comment from your ...


7

Yes. Send it. It will give them a chance to look at it, be prepared, and have questions. I've been in interviews where the interviewer had no idea what to ask, and it was uncomfortable. Besides questions, it will help them to be prepared to give information on the type of job you'd be good for.


6

You could say what you just told us - that you don't want that employer to know that you're looking at other companies because you want to keep your options open. An analogous situation would be looking for another job whilst currently employed. A prospective employer contacting your current employer could give your current employer a heads up that you're ...


6

You're a student, so ask your mentor, or whoever is undertaking that role. You have a support network there, you should use it in order to assess the suitability and attractiveness of your resume and online profiles and help you to become more successful.


6

Maintain an up-to-date CV. Every time you have something to add, update the CV. new job new project new customer new tool KPI's quality factors awards effects you produced (made cheaper, made faster, made better quality...) and so on...


5

A job interview after a bad previous employer is a bit like going on a first date after a messy divorce. Show your best side and keep the previous bad experience short and at a high level. A few rules of thumb can go a long way: Show that you won't start trouble. Hearing that you got upper management, HR and an attorney involved is very scary stuff to ...


5

On a resume and in person, strongly resist temptations or requests to describe your skill "on a scale of 1-10" or "beginner/intermediate/expert". Instead, describe what you can do, and what you do at the moment. So if you set up systems, say so. If you build web sites using this and that framework, say so. If you wrote a few scripts as part of some larger ...


4

I'm going to provide another answer since the existing one is more focused around keeping your CV updated, but your tag and title suggest a performance review within your company. What I personally do is to keep a personal log of events in which I track the things that went well, the things that didn't go as planned or could have been improved, and any ...


4

If it makes you feel comfortable, you can consider separately mentioning your two work durations with Company X. You need not mention anymore details apart from this. Just leave out the 9 month period. If enquired about the reason for gap, you can simply mention that it was due to health and recovery reasons without revealing much details. You may not get ...


3

Distinguish based on title not job description Specify the internship separately from the job on your resume. It doesn't matter whether the job responsibilities changed much or not between designations. Your resume also speaks about how you progressed within the same company. Being on internship followed by a full-time job conveys more information to ...


3

What tools are you using to track and manage your achievements and the value you’ve created for your employer? I originally used a piece of paper, then I switched to a Word doc. I can't imagine a need for anything more complex than that.


3

Like anyone making a career change, this is a valid question. One really needs to account for the past several years of employment, to show a work history, and ability to hold a job. But a potential employer looking to hire a computer programmer doesn't much care if said employee can function as a gas station cashier, specifically. What I have done in ...


3

Talk with a recruiter. Either to get help on finding a placement, or to help with your CV. I'm a bit biased against college academic advisors - in my experience, they drift away from a business-world mentality and into an academic one (understandable, since they spend each day surrounded by academia.) A recruiter doesn't have that issue. They're used to ...


3

I have hired people in the private sector. This is not an issue. In the interview you can mention you worked in two separate labs doing similar things. Call it whatever you want, but don't call it a mistake. In the interview you want to highlight you successes and why you are a good fit for this position. Going into minutia about why you listed this ...


3

Wait till nearly the end of your internship and ask for a written recommendation. This way they can highlight your total successes and quality of work. Once they have given it to you, you can ask that if they have time to hit your linkedin page for a few endorsements. It may be wise to keep a running log of projects and milestones you have completed so ...


3

Your field is also quite in demand, so you would probably not be causing real damage by omitting it. That said, I would lean toward labeling it as a contract position. You can discuss the precise detail of what it was if need be during an interview, but a resume/CV is supposed to paint a picture in few words. Contract--while not precisely true--is the ...


3

You are overthinking this. Technically you were employed for the entire duration of N years with the company. If you specify it any other way, this will create a confusion for every other person who comes across it, and you can potentially face issues (longer durations) in your background checks if being done by third party. Recruiters and other ...


2

Have you discussed your cv with friends and family? Usually, you will know some people with work experience. They will tell you if your cv is terrible. From your description it was not clear to me whether you are available immediately, or only several months in the future? I know that many companies are not interested in finding an employee for next year, ...


2

As a hiring manager, I used resumes to determine who to offer interviews to. You are correct about that. However, I also used them to come up with questions that were particular to individuals. A resume can highlight import aspects about you that you want the manager to know about. The kind of things that you excel at. The kind of things that if they ask ...


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