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87

I quantified almost nothing in my CV. I just provided numbers when they were objectively available: date of birth, scores in school etc. Other than that, I just wrote about the experience and the projects I worked for. Usually, if you read carefully, the examples with "quantization" apply to jobs where numbers are "Gods" - and those are usually sales (or ...


53

Personally I think the "quantify everything" advice (which I've seen as well) is really bad advice for software engineers. We work in teams, we don't produce anything individually (unless you're the sole developer, in which case you can claim 100% of everything...). Highlight the technologies you've worked with, the responsibilities you had at your previous ...


9

As someone who reads Software Developer Resumes routinely, quantify if you want or don't. It really doesn't matter as I ignore that part of the bullet point anyway because I know you wouldn't have put it on your resume if it's bad. Also it's likely inflated numbers anyway. The most important things for me are: Familiarity with multiple programming ...


9

Right now, I have a gap in my resume from the time that I left until now Education / specialized studies are a perfectly valid reason for a gap in work experience, so sure, go for putting the experience in your resume. One way to do that would be you bump the education section to the top in your resume, and mention it there instead of writing it as work ...


5

Yes, it would. It would save people asking you for that information. Generally speaking, if you get repeated queries for certain information, it makes sense to include that information in your CV/resume.


5

As @virolino already pointed out, you don't have to quantify anything if you don't want or don't have something to. I personally quantify my work so, that other people can see what exactly I did and more important which impact I made. If you have worked about 2,5 years, you have done things, which you can quantify and list in CV. To give you a direction - ...


5

should I include it in a separate section on my resume or just list it as a bulletpoint in the experience section under a job? If your work-related paper is being published outside the realm of your job, then it should be in a separate "Publications" section. Hopefully, you'll have more papers listed over time, and this is just the first. If instead this ...


4

I think numbers are incredibly important, to help give a sense of the size and scope of the work you've done. The rest of this answer is from a blog post of mine: We know that numbers attract attention. When scanning your resume, the reader’s eye will be drawn to the numbers naturally. Moreover, numbers make your story more interesting and give the reader ...


3

What parts should I leave out? Should I go and include everything in my resume? In addition to your most recent software development work, I'd include Developed industrial control systems, Electronics and microcontroller development, Consultant for companies in matters of IT and Networking. Everything else seems rather irrelevant for the jobs you are ...


3

I suggest spending most of the space for experience on what you did during the last 5 years. However, I would give a line each to your grocery store job and the internship. When reading a resume I was generally looking for two types of skill. One was whatever technical skills I needed. The other was a more general good employee skill set. The grocery store ...


3

As an intern, especially part-time, hiring companies will understand that you didn't get to deliver finished products of your work into "production". They are expecting that you got good exposure and a chance to work with those technologies. You don't need to explicitly state that you didn't get to complete the projects. Just be accurate in your ...


3

I ask this because while googling around for a long time, I came across a lot of websites saying that development companies want to know what your dreams are. I suppose they mean your professional dreams. Do you think that it is a good idea to add your personal dreams to your portfolio or is not necessary? It might work at certain tech companies. I think it ...


2

Resumes, CVs and portfolios should demonstrate skills and experiences that you already have which would be valuable for potential employers. They are looking for you to be productive now (or soon after hiring). Your dreams/goals are valuable to an employer after you achieve them. Saying you would like to learn new computer language isn't valuable to the ...


2

You should include in your resume those experiences that you feel best demonstrate your capabilities. I would find a poker career interesting for a number of potential reasons: You’ve successfully navigated being self-employed. Self-employment, regardless of your source of revenue, is a challenging responsibility and very transferable experience to managing ...


2

Most people don't start their working life in the profession that they end it with. Most of us have worked at gas stations, fast food restaurants, etc. Those jobs may not be related to your chosen profession but they are part of your work history. As such I don't see any issue with including it. Most employers will naturally understand that you weren't born ...


2

How far back in my pre-job experience should I be listing, given that it's not really topical? Is it better to leave it in to show that I have done things before this job, which I've held for three years, or is it too irrelevant to be worth listing? It is recommended that you tailor your resume according to the job you are applying to. That means that if ...


2

Put PhD Candidate. Contrary to what others suggest here IMHO it is not lying to put it under work experience (where I am from it is considered a job and you get the normal job benefits). It might depend on the rest of your resume and the exact job you are applying for whether it is better to put it under education or work experience. I have gone both ways ...


1

I have the below in my resume, as is under the Education section: Education: Master's of Computer Science "university" "location" Received "Outstanding achievement in Computer Science" Reward Receive Scholarship in this and that I would and will just include any future published papers as a new bullet point, as I believe published ...


1

Whether you quantify your contributions is not as important as indicating whether your projects were successful. Did the result meet the market favorably? Your resume would best focus on your most important contributions to the success of projects, the technologies/tools incorporated and used, and your expertise using them. I recently did a painful series ...


1

You should try to quantify the things that you think the recruiters want to know. Working as one of a team of 5 (or 15) is slightly useful, as it indicates the sort of working environment you're used to. It would be more useful if you could quantify your position relative to the others, maybe you were one of 5 senior engineers out of those 15 engineers. ...


1

Usually, you are allowed some bullet points in a resume. "Software Engineer" is quite broad and can be anything from IT support with some coding to scientist developing and implementing new things in software. So some points that further explain your exact roles and also include your achievements in this role should be fine. For example, something like ...


1

You were a part time intern, so no one expects much from you, let alone finished products. Just outline the areas you were involved with and go into more detail if asked. Target jobs where your training is an asset in terms of the job description.


1

Your CV should include the most relevant experience you have which makes you suitable for the job you're applying for. Did you use your knowledge and skills in statistics and data science during your poker career? If yes then they could be worth including, as long as you're able to highlight them as the key skills you used to be successful. If not then don'...


1

Best not to. CVs/portfolios are formal documents if anything, and folks expect them to be a bit sober and formulaic. At the least, you're hurting your chances to find jobs cause people will skip based off of bad signals. If they can't easily parse you from the CV, or if it raises some red flags (beware! a non-conformist!) they'll skip you and move on to a ...


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