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3

"Bah, Humbug!" "Dead giveaways of age?" (These kids today!!") 🙄 But seriously ... "the ability to 'do' something, yourself, is one thing, but the ability to 'teach or train'* someone else *to do it, is entirely another!" Today, I'm extremely proud that I served for very-many as a community-college instructor, and also as ...


0

Depends on where are you sending resume, for management or academia job, absolutely. But if you are going for technical job then it might fairly decrease your chances. Fact that one was mentoring is usually one of dead giveways of age.


15

should I include these in my resume or it could be seen by the new company as a bad thing? Absolutely, include them. Make sure to include a link, if you can, so the content may be viewed by prospective employers. If you cannot make it available online, definitely be prepared to discuss or show the course when interviewing. Probably goes without saying, but ...


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Updated answer: Now that you have clarified some things I think you should mention it, so you don't have a gap on your resume to explain, but don't make it the most important thing you mention there. I hold what suggested earlier: Focus on including paid jobs that you've held for at least 6 months, and most importantly jobs that relate to the one you are ...


1

germany here. I've needed a long, comprehensive list of former employments - but not with the CV that goes for a job application. The CV I use for job applications is 2 pages of information and for academia an additional list of my most relevant publications. In your case, an analogous showcase list of relevant projects may be good. Showcase implying that ...


6

From a UK (rather than strictly speaking European) perspective, I'd say the sweet-spot is somewhere in between. As ever keeping irrelevant information to a minimum (and zero if you can manage it) is paramount - but that doesn't mean you have to work to an arbitrary length requirement as seems to be the case in more US-centric approaches (I've known US-based ...


2

A little disclaimer: my experience is in France in software industry (as a project manager and recruiter) so it may be different in other fields or countries. For a junior position, we (french software companies) tend to prefer one page CV/resume but I guess you're not asking as a junior. For a senior position, the standard is a resume like this: First ...


0

Should I keep track of my full employment and project history? Or can I safely ignore that detail and focus on the stuff that really matters for a concise resume? For the employment details, yes. Sometimes, it's useful for background checks etc. For the project details, no. It's almost never needed / can be disclosed. Project specifics are not needed. In ...


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Yes. At least this shows you're willing to put in the effort. I would also wager that this helps them as CVs cannot always be split into information. Unless your skillset is so in demand that they are the one asking you to please apply, you should partake. Though I would advise to only provide elements that ar only of use or help you stand out in a good way.


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Generally it's wise to put in all the information that is relevant (or ones that you wish the company to consider). When it comes to unpaid jobs, there usually is a section for community service or volunteer work where you can include that kind of information.


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Several other questions specifically mention IT, which is not relevant to you since you are not in IT. I am similarly in an industry where we have a fairly regular set of titles ("associate", "senior", "principal", et.). However, like you I also regularly apply to positions outside my current industry where those titles may be ...


12

I have taken a good 4.5 years gap and got a job later. What I did: Written a good cover letter, mentioning my skillset before the gap. There was one single sentence that said, I am interested to return to the industry after taking a gap of 4.5 years. What are the skillsets or the tech stack that I have learnt during the gap and how I am preparing myself to ...


1

Senior title can leave you in big disadvantage (assuming you are in IT). Tech is rapidly evolving, what was relevant say, 3 years ago may not be relevant today, and "senior" title usually implies that you spent significant amount of your work life doing same thing. I am speaking from my own anegdotal experience, temprorarily worked few months in ...


0

List all the volunteer projects on the resume, volunteer works looks good. Also, in the interview emphasize everything you just mentioned. I recovered from a FIVE year gap doing just that. Tell the student they can turn their misfortune into an advantage by demonstrating all the work and education they pursued rather than sitting back and doing nothing. ...


3

How to best address this in interview, on resume and with HR ? They should honestly state the reason(s) for the gap and let the prospective employer know what they have been doing in the meantime to maintain/improve their skill set. After that it is up to the prospective employer to determine if they are willing to take a chance on this candidate or not.


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I'd say it somewhat depends on the title and how close to finishing you are... if you are in a program that has a high likelihood of ending in Accreditation and a known accreditation date - I think you could say something like: Pending Accreditation XYZ - expected MM/DD/YYYY date I'm not sure I'd do that for things that are 99% about passing a test, as ...


4

As a rule of thumb you should tailor your resume for each job you are applying, in order to maximize your chances. If this job you are applying is related to the accreditation you are coursing, then include it, as it will surely be beneficial (if it's not I suggest you focus on including/mentioning other aspects more related). As you are currently coursing ...


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If accreditation directly related to the jobs you are applying for, you should mention it on the resume you send out


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