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1

Do you guys think I would be able to get a job without a CS degree, and only have bootcamps on my resume? (as source for education) Most state and federal jobs put a hard requirement on at least an Associates Degree to become programmer. They will not look at your resume without a degree. Historically there are exceptions, but few and almost none apply to ...


3

Software development is way more logic than it is math. Here's the weird thing: schools (both high school and higher education) teach a lot of math but they barely teach logic. Unless you go into philosophy or get more than halfway into university mathematics, your exposure to logic will typically be one "geometric proofs" class in high school ...


4

Bootcamps aren't really worth the money. Especially doing multiple ones. You just won't pick up the skills you need that way due to overlap, and doing multiple ones won't make the resume look better- if anything it will make it look like you couldn't grow beyond that. Getting a job programming during college would be difficult, because most programming ...


2

If you want to start a career as a programmer, and find some relevant employment while you are a still a student, you might want to look to see if there are some part-time opportunities offered by your university. For example, as a student, I worked for the Computer Science department as a "course consultant" / grader for a few semesters - where I ...


6

Computer science is not software engineering, in the way that metallurgy is not designing bridges. Software engineering isn't really maths either, and certainly not advanced maths. But if you can't handle the basics of logic and mathematics, you'll be stuck. A degree will help you get a job in programming. Some employers expect a degree, some won't care so ...


-2

bootcamps are useless on resume. do them as you wish, but don't expect them - as such - to help getting a programming job github repos are useless on resume. again: do them as you wish, but don't expect them - as such - to help getting a programming job if you're a truly good programmer it doesn't matter much if you don't have a degree. DEGREES ARE GREAT ...


3

Update: I feel I might have jumped into too quick assumptions, and — at first — had given shallow advice. To fix that, here is the updated variant: About the format: First of all, regarding your concern about the format: the CV is not about presenting a timeline "in the correct fashion". The CV is about selling yourself as best as you can. ...


2

Don't overthink it. If you worked part time for a year, put in "1 year". The end game is to be able to speak credibly about your experience in an interview. Job reqs that ask for "X years of experience" have cracks in them, for example asking for 10 yrs of experience with XYZ when XYZ was invented 5 years ago. Again, don't overthink ...


7

For the sake of putting in an answer, You definitely would not "convert" it to fulltime. Whatever you do, don't do that. (So in the example, absolutely do not say "3 months fulltime".) You can simply write "1/2020 - 6/2020: ferret wrangler. Half-time position." And if you don't mention at this point that it was half-time, ...


5

In the U.S. at least, it's unfortunately normal to be firewalled off from the actual client company by the recruiter -- the recruiter wants to make sure they protect their role as middle-person until they're paid and/or a contract is signed. I once had a tense situation where a company really needed someone in a hurry and they liked me, but I was on the ...


43

Recruiters earn a commission every time they "sell" a new employee to a company. So the last thing they want is a candidate who bypasses the recruiter and talks to the company directly. They want to remain in the middle, so that they can claim their fee when you are eventually hired.


18

It is unlikely it is "fishy". It is "unusual", "dumb", "bad practice" but it's unlikely to be literally a scam or lie of some sort. You mention possible scams such as "the recruiter has no contact with the client and is using my completed test as a way in. Or maybe the test is going to be used to promote another ...


6

Keep it "party neutral" . The valuable part are the activities you did, not for whom. You don't need to mention the name or affiliation of the organization or candidate you worked for. There is always the risk than someone will ask or maybe Google it. That's a gamble you need to take. If you are not comfortable with this, leave it off the resume.


4

There are 3 basic rules for writing a CV: keep it simple and short - the people who read it usually do not have the time to read an entire complicated encyclopedia; keep it true - everything you write must be true; otherwise, it might come back to hurt you; leave out everything that will not help you, or if it can hurt you (or your chances). This point does ...


0

The problem with just listing skills is that there is no way for the employer to know: Your level of knowledge in that skill What you consider "knowing" that skill Whether you're lying People list experience as a way of solving these problems. Tradesmen also do it by way of reviews, testimonials and references. But unlike tradesmen, it is much ...


5

You haven't specified your location, so I'll answer from my own perspective of the UK. Recruiters don't look at work experience at that level of detail. To a recruiter, 6 months experience and 7 months experience are equivalent. If you have multiple short-term contracts, then you can add a summary of the total experience in technologies relevant to the job ...


1

TLDR; The combination style resume is good. It emphasizes your skills, like you want. If a hierarchy format can be made to look clean and concise, it could be one way of doing the skills (foremost and top) section of a combination resume. A functional resume also could do this, but lacks the list of jobs, so a largely-functional, but combination, resume, is ...


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