Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

New answers tagged

3

No, you shouldn't change the names. You can't say for sure that the curriculum is the same in the new course as in the old one, and you've been awarded the old title. Most Uni awards have some code or reference number. Maybe you can include that for reference.


3

Usually the preference is to put in the resume what you can prove: that is, the same name of degree as you have in your certificate. If the university chose to change the name, you can mention both old and new names in the resume. It does not hurt either way. Any cosmetic change, causing a difference between the job requirement and the actual (your resume)...


1

Are you... a wizard? If so, then you don't need a degree. You just need to find one company to give you a chance, and then prove yourself. When it's time to move on, you'll be able to find your next job on the strength of your real-world accomplishments. Quantify them if you can. Preferably in dollars. Yes, there are companies that prioritize education and ...


1

As someone who has conducted interviews I would not hold this against you since you have some years of experience working in the field. Generally I would care more about college education for entry level position candidates that have little to no experience in the industry. Even then I'm curious about projects they worked on in college, no so much the degree ...


1

Yes, it is most likely that the lack of post-secondary education is holding back your career. Please understand that unfortunately, a resume is too many times simply filtered through a list of keywords/requirements. These folks will not make a human interpretation of your skills if the resume is not passing the must haves. Or, think of the results of the ...


0

I retired from one of the Dow Jones 30 companies. As far as I can remember, most of the software developer employees have college degrees. It seems to me people without college education would have difficulty getting into the company. I think the main reason is that they do not want to just hire a web developer. They want someone with the potential to do ...


1

Probably. Almost everybody that sees your resume has a degree. Being more like them would certainly make them like you more. That doesn't mean you need the degree though: You only need 1 company to hire you (at a time). Right now, that may mean you have to apply to more jobs, but as you gain more years in the workforce, your degree (if you had one) would ...


3

I like @Kilisi's answer a lot, but felt it was a bit abstract. Eradicant, I've been a contractor for a really long time and have found that a simple description of each project and the technologies used provide for a great CV (aka Sales Brochure) Here's an actual example from my own CV (looks better in MS Word; Client and project names have been changed): ...


8

No particular engineer is responsible for any given part of the code. Rather, everyone as a group is responsible for all of the code. Nothing abnormal about this, being able to work in a team is a good thing anyway. Resumes work best with tangible accomplishments and saying that one was "part of" something doesn't provide evidence of my individual ...


7

It depends on the company you're applying to. Some larger companies, especially those that get a large number of applicants need ways to quickly boil down the applicant pool. Often times that first cut is made by looking at an applicant's education, which seems to be the most common filter criteria I've come across. In these situations, you're just ...


127

Your lack of education may or may not be hurting you. It would depend on the company to which you are applying. Some care a great deal about your formal education, others don't mind so much if you can demonstrate you have sufficient experience and skill. What is hurting you is the fact you are listing your high school education and then nothing higher. We ...


13

Yes, your lack of formal education as listed on your resume could be holding you back. The Fortune 50 company you're applying to will have an HR department. HR is where resumes go to die. They will be looking for certain 'keywords' and if your resume does not have whatever is specified then your resume will go in the circular file. So what to do? ...


-2

Answers here are OVERLOOKING this important detail- LinkedIn asks for the "Company" name, not your employer name so if you are working as a long term contractor you can go either way. You ARE working for your long term client b/c you are working within the bounds set by that organization, following their procedures, security protocols, working with their ...


1

Can I say i'm working for the first? You definitely can. You can even say that you are best buddy with the Mars Rover and together you hit pubs and strip clubs on Jupiter every evening. But if you want to the completely true - and the information in the CV MUST always be completely true, even if presented in a favorable light - then you should go like this:...


3

Been there, done that. Most consultants in Italy say that they work for the final customer (in your case, BigCompany) and, at the same time, for their real employer. I was employed by SmallCompany which leased me to BigCompany which leased me to BiggerCompany and, at some point, I was approached by my line manager in BiggerCompany and told that I should ...


1

@Rupert Morrish beat me to the answer (upvote) If you want to keep you conscience clear(ish), you could always say "I work at BigCompany, Inc" and let others draw their own conclusions. I will enlarge a little. I have been a software contractor for much longer than you have been alive, and use "I work for" since BigCompany gains from my work (more than ...


8

You don't need to say that you worked for the large company. Keep in mind, telling the full truth will only take up a few extra words on your resume. Seriously, there's nothing wrong with: 2017-2019 - Data Analytics with Disney, through Smalltown Consulting Co. ... or something similar. This isn't a choice between A) Say you worked at Smalltown ...


1

Not sure whether it works in Italian, but in English I've described my previous contract employment as "working at BigCorp", which is not the same as working for them.


16

You can say you're working on projects for Big Company, but not for them as a consultant. This is a direct untruth. Always be scrupulously honest whenever there is a grey area. Small company is paying you, you work for them. Any background check would find this out pretty quickly and put your CV at the bottom of the pile if not discard it altogether.


-2

This depends entirely on your specific situation. Some contracting arrangements are fine with this, others very much are not. I recommend one or both of the following: Check your contract Ask your manager at SmallCompany: while they may not be involved much in your day-to-day work, they still need to answer for any mistakes you make (including ...


2

I wouldn't presume to tell you what you need to be noticed by a big HR department. But as an engineer who farms work to other engineers, while some quantitative information helps me understand the scope, pace and intensity of what you've worked on and therefore (presumably) what you'd be able to handle, I'm much more interested in why than how... and I'm ...


4

I had Owner of a small business on my Resume, recently. I was doing technical writing on computer security. I was able to secure a job without any problem. Some people might see it as negative, but so what. Do you really want to work at a company where the managers are scoffing at the great things you have done? Find the job where the people there truly ...


Top 50 recent answers are included