New answers tagged

-1

It must be said that you plan to give most of your time to training in the company. This kind of training will yield much more results, because you will be able to see the specifics of working in this company, rather than the abstract skills that you would receive in an educational institution. In this way, you will show what you want to learn and that is a ...


5

Just don't mention it was your replacement you trained: Eventually, I was tasked with training others in the responsibilities and activities of the role. This single sentence helps to show that you had become competent enough to train other people, and it really didn't matter who you trained.


-3

Keep it short and to the point; if you assisted in mentoring and training your colleague(s) then state it that way. "I assisted in mentoring and training my colleague(s)." A couple of years ago, I was hired as a "summer student" in an Application Support (2nd tier support) role. Nobody you're interviewing with cares about how you got your previous job. ...


0

If you are not actively looking, ignore it. Unlikely to get anywhere Check whether the recruiter is actually an employee of the company or from an indepdent agency. If it's agency, tell them to go away. They are just harvesting resumes for their database. If it's a company employee, check out the company and see of your are interested and whether it's a ...


1

Most likely there isn't a job - yet. That doesn't mean there won't be in the future. Given this is coming from an internal recruiter at a company rather than an agency, the usual concerns that they are just harvesting CVs for the database of people to hit up with emails/phone calls every time a potential match becomes available is lessened. Most likely ...


2

I'm quite proud of it, and really think that it is one of my better achievements with the company -- how would I list it on my resume? Something like "I authored and maintain a tool that is used organization wide and saves several hundred man hours a year." would work. It would likely prompt some interview questions that you can be ready to answer: Tell ...


7

There is no need to put it on git. Write a sentence or two that covers what it did, how it was used, how much money/time it saved and that fact that you took the initiative to design, develop, and maintain the software. It highlights that you take initiative to create useful things.


0

I've been trying to launch my business for about a year now. I still have no idea whether this will work long term or whether I'll have to get a job, so I want to point out the following: A year sounds like a lot now, but everything takes longer than you think it will. Clients need a string of well timed follow up calls before they buy anything, technical ...


0

Here's an aside: "in your comments, I sense the signs of clinical depression, which is a medical condition that can be quite dangerous. "It kills many people ... by their own hand." "Our brains" really are magical things, running on "voodoo chemistry." But, they can become ill. When this happens, though, here's the problem: "they're the only thing that ...


2

If I determine the project is not going anywhere after a year and I need to go back to a normal job, how would this make me look to a potential employer? You don't have to add your self-employment experience on your CV, right? Just list your experience like any other CV. Give yourself a title such as "senior programmer", "product engineer" etc. Your ...


7

I agree with the others that a failed venture is generally not looked at negatively, but there is one more important aspect that I feel needs to be said. You mentioned that if you feel the project isn't going anywhere after a year you may look for other work. In an interview, you will need to be able to show what you worked on, and explain what you did for ...


7

I do not find any negative aspect of being an entrepreneur in the past. That been said: You don't know who is going to be your future employer and you can always find an employer who thinks it is negative. There are some positions that are a better fit for a non-ambitious person. You probably do not want to join a company in either of those cases.


3

Succeed or fail, I don't see how entrepreneurship could be looked at negatively. Anyone who would see it negatively is probably a fool.


1

You are right, it is unprofessional, and is probably costing your friend more than it is helping. "Foreign Languages" is for languages used in human communication, such as French or English. For computer languages, I would put a separate section titled "Programming Languages". RegEx is also a search syntax, not a programming language or a foreign language. ...


3

In some countries, the title "Engineer" is protected by law, you must have obtained the corresponding degree. I would advise you to label your expertise as: Data Science - Aerospace Electrical Engineering - Software development This would leave the possible issue aside and the result would almost be the same.


3

Best advice: do not lie on your cv. If software was a part of your degree you can mention it. If you studied it on your own then mention it as private interests or hobbies but do not claim it as part of a qualification if it was not part of that qualification.


1

As somebody who is partially responsible for hiring scientifically oriented people into technical positions inq industry: Unless there is an objective criteria to a freshly set up program, just mention the name of the university. What you could write is "Phd program by government, acceptance rate 1%" if you have the feeling that it's really not known well ...


-3

You are wasting your time. It's like convincing the programmers here programming (their living skill sets) is a cheap often-outsourced skills set in this forum. People here don't want to hear and don't care. Similarly, commercial companies don't care about your academic experience. People generally don't switch from prestigious academics to industry if they ...


1

If I were reading a resume and cared at all about the reputation of a person or institution I did not recognize I would pay little attention to a footnote that might be biassed and instead would do my own Internet search. However, you are in effect asking potential employers to give weight to other people's opinions of your abilities in an unrelated field. ...


0

It depends a lot on what you have there. If something is very prestigious, it should be known to those reading your CV without you adding footnotes. If you worked for very well-known institutions and now add footnotes or similar explanations, you risk coming across as patronizing. Your readers may think you are taking them for idiots. Normally, people with ...


-1

Usually, when a recruiter (or anyone else) says they want an updated resume, they mean a resume that's appropriate for applying for the position in question. In other words, they don't want a resume that's been on your hard drive collecting dust for two years. It needs to have all the trainings you've completed, all your experience, all the way up to the ...


10

While there was at least one college who accepted computer languages as credits for a foreign language, I'm hard pressed to see how changing the resume and listing the skill under a foreign language header will be more compelling than listing it normally. He lists it normally - everyone understands He lists it separately, as a foreign language. Most people ...


33

Your CV is a way to provide information, not an art piece. As such, it should be honest, clear and to the point. The people checking it will probably be handling dozens of them, and probably will not have neither the time nor the state of mind nor the background to understand clever jokes, double entendres and the like. No matter how funny do you think it ...


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