New answers tagged

9

I don't see much wrong with listing it. For all I know (as an employer) you may have gotten permission to do it, and I'm certainly not going to read through the ToS of the website and make assumptions about what terms you may have have broken. I think most employers are just going to look at it as a project, not think about potential legal aspects. - Maybe I'...


5

Think about this: You're asking if you should tell a potential employer, who is going to have all sorts of concerns about contracts, liability, and ethical behavior, that you violated a TOS contract, which if you did it under their employ, would expose them to liability. No, don't advertise it, and don't engage in unethical behavior in the future. ETA: Also,...


3

It should be listed under Education Education is anything that educates you. It's not only for degrees or diplomas. For example, I graduated from a military school. There was a piece of paper added to my military record, and no diploma or certificate that I could show an employer. I list it under Education. Online courses that you pay for, they can go ...


2

Yes, it's completely normal to mention this. It's a non-issue: have a line in your cv mentioning this. You mention for example "bootcamps". Similarly, it's completely normal to mention those in a line in your cv. Say nothing about whether it is paid, unpaid, or anything else. (Obviously) openly state the actual name of the institution/facility. ...


1

Here's the thing about staying at your current job or searching for a new one: At the end of the day, it's your choice, not your boss's. Your boss can influence your choice by treating you well and making you want to stay, or treating you poorly and giving you incentive to leave. It sounds like his reaction to seeing that you may be thinking of leaving is ...


-10

Social media is for preteens. As you can see it leads to nonsensical situations. As an adult professional, never use social media again. Regarding the recent tribulations at your current job. Unfortunately, as an employee the one and only choice one has is to stay or leave. If they suck, leave today.


9

Learn to pick your battles. Except for the new job title, revert your changes to your LinkedIn profile. In the scheme of things, LinkedIn is not that critical for you right now. Update your resume. That's what really matters. And send it out confidentially to different companies. I know you said you're not interested in looking for a new job, but I do think ...


3

My advice is that you need to appeal to both a non-technical HR person/recruiter, and also a technical person who isn't going to be impressed with you just listing a list of technologies. The process that your CV is going to go through, is going to be something like this: It lands on the recruiters desk, who is looking to fill a certain role. That recruiter ...


2

My question is how explicit and exhaustive I should be about these skills on my CV? Not so much. Resumes are usually read by HR who know nothing about all the things you'll write there. They'll be looking for the tools that fit the job description. You could rate yourself (Look, this skill is 3/5, this one 5/5, etc.) but it still doesn't mean much as you ...


8

My question is how explicit and exhaustive I should be about these skills on my CV? I found that the CV must be written per not-tech people because the first step is always with a not-tech person. So listing all the frameworks or packages is not useful at all, you need only key frameworks for the company you are applying for should be listed like. It is a ...


0

When you're looking for a job, and you're putting together your CV it's a very good idea to quantify the impact of your work - if you can. Sometimes you have no way to know what impact a project you delivered or took part in had on the company or the userbase. But recruiters and hiring managers like to see that engineers are aware of the impact of their work ...


6

Should I add my previous banking work experiences in resume? Yes Obviously, for each section of experience, you have to decide how detailed it needs to be. Your last technical job might be very detailed, while your banking job might just be a one-liner with the job title and company at the end of the list. But if it is an important part of your work life (...


2

I think it really depends. If your resume is targeting a technical job, then you prioritise any technical experience you've had. Non relevant experience should stay on your resume until you have enough experience in your chosen industry that there is no longer room for it. If choosing between you and a candidate with exactly the same (relevant) experience, ...


2

Well, the bottom line is: you only add the relevant information in a CV. To elaborate: Describe the past experiences which are relevant to the job profile you're applying for, and just mention the work tenure of other jobs you held. The jobs which are not directly relevant, can be just a one-liner(s), and if applicable, can mention the learnings you obtained ...


0

This is from some aspect an opinion-based question. So I happily give mine. Your students are adapting a new name so why not adapting the order? Order should be of second degree of importance compared to the first name change. Look it this way, if she also wants to change her family name to Smith for example, is there any reason for her to go with Smith Beth ...


2

Is there a best practice for this? I'm not sure of any real codified standards, but capitalizing the entire SURNAME is a very handy way to cut down on ambiguity (that should hopefully catch on more everywhere). The string of Latin-alphabet characters Zhang "Beth" Qiong in the name field is a poor choice for the target audience of American colleges/...


0

The best references are the ones who are able to speak capably about you, will give you a good review, and are at least somewhat charismatic over phone/email. Why? Because the worst thing that could happen is someone you pick gives a negative review. After that, you want someone who will sound convincing, they're selling you a bit. As an aside- ...


8

Resumes should be tailored for the audience they're intended for (In fact, pretty much everything communicated should be done with the intent of clearly conveying information to the recipient as best as possible. If you're a tech person communicating with someone that's been a HVAC repair specialist for 20 years, the tech person shouldn't be using terms ...


4

There are 2 issues here. The first issue is that Asian names tend to be ordered Last-First, while Western names are First-Last. If Beth is applying to a Western institution (or company), many, or at least some, of the places she is applying will think her first name is Zhang, and that might be awkward. So my first piece of advice to Beth would be to write ...


1

On resumes Is there a best practice for this? Yes, I have always seen Zhang Beth Qiong As you mention, quotes - John "Fattie" Smith or Eddie "Play Faster" Van Halen - are, precisely, for nicknames. It's not a nickname at all. Brackets are used for a translation or transliteration. Rebecca (Capitivating) Smith or Makoto (Peaceful) ...


5

A good reference is going to be simply one that the company finds acceptable, and provide the company with a sense of trust that you are all that you say you are. It's both as simple and as complicated as that. Typically different interviewers will hold different opinions about what is important. So, typically you would find someone who would: Be respected ...


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