New answers tagged

0

The best title is whatever helps you either do this job or get your next job. For the 2nd, figure out what job you want next and that's your answer. If the issue is "interacting with vendors" then (assuming you're a tiny company) you can probably call yourself a VP of something, or manager of something, or director of something without a problem.


4

First, and most important, remember that the friend who is advising you is a liar. Probably he is truthfully telling you about lies he has told others, but given you are dealing with a liar you should not count on that. How much you can get away with depends in part on how skilled and practiced you are at lying. It will not just be limited to what you write....


1

I’ve gone ahead and upvoted your question because though it shows tremendous immaturity, laziness and devious nature, it is worth understanding why it’s a terrible idea. I should probably be downvoted for not heeding, “ Anonymous is a new contributor. Be nice,” but some things need to be said. Here’s how your question reads: I have wants but I don’t ...


11

There is a difference between being a salesman and a liar. You need to be the former Sales people, for a start, don't outright lie. What do they do? They bring the good qualities that are relevant to the buyer to the forefront, and de-emphasise shortcomings as much as is reasonably possible. What you and your CV should be doing is this. Straight-up ...


1

how much of this stuff can I get away with? Likely very little. "Lieing is bad mkay!" Any HR worth its salt will do a decent background check. Often looking into your social media and your friends social media to see what you where actually doing. Only ever put things on your resume/cv you actually did. You can exclude time frames from it and keep a list ...


20

Do not lie on your résumé. Your friend is giving you bad advice. There are no "safe" ways to fabricate work experience. Employers are smarter than you think. Background checks can identify faked experience. And if you lie about having experience and skills, then your inexperience will show in your performance. Maybe you get the job, but you're not ...


1

As far as your opening question - "am i still hireable", you're always hireable. (You can always get another management job you know, I'm told that those positions still exist even after downturns). But as long as you have a reason why you're applying for a technical role once you have had management experience (ie I love technical roles), then you're fine. ...


0

10 years of engineering sounds quite low to me personally to be considered for management, so maybe you have that on your side, at a future date you could say you were not done getting your hands dirty doing the real work. At 32 years now of technical work, I'm done for sure and nobody replies to my resume anymore despite me doing the best work of my career,...


1

My old department lead found a job as developer just fine after getting laid off. This may depend upon connections, how much development you did before becoming a manager, etc... Also, I think this may depend on country. I know that in Germany, older people said there is no way back from management. But I think it's not as true as it used to be. But that may ...


2

No you can't, but it actually a good thing. The previous answers are great. I'll add to it that a potential employer would probably be more impressed that you assumed the level of responsibility and the leadership role that you did without having that title. That shows a willingness to step-up, and who doesn't want to hire someone like that? Your lack of ...


2

can I put the senior title on my CV? No. I know it is nice to have a "senior" badge in your resume, but it is not about this. You are "selling" to a potentional employer not your title but: Experience Knowledge Projects done Professionalism etc. Consider this: Senior developer in noName startup doing Wordpress has fewer market value as junior developer ...


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The question is, can I put the senior title on my CV? In this case, NO. Do not "invent" new title / designation, go by what you can prove (contract / references). How do I explain to a future employer that I deserve a seniors salary? This will entirely depend on the factor that how much value you bring in and going to add to the organization. Do not ...


7

Like this: 2007-2020 Yoyodyne (a subsidiary of ACME Global) Mention first, by its most recent name, the place you're bragging about (yeah, with 13 years you should brag. shamelessly. it's a big deal.) Then, just to clarify, mention the corporate overlord. People in your line of work will recognize the former, and executives will recognize the latter (or ...


0

Here's how to think about this incredibly valuable experience. Claim, then proof. Claim: I can sell. Proof: I convinced callers to the office to become customers, resulting in 20% sales growth. Claim: I deal well with the public. Proof: the business thrived partially because I served as its telephone voice. Claim: I do what needs to be done. Proof: ...


1

You need, for applying to commercial / industrial companies, a much shorter document called a resumé. It typically has a section for each job you have held, including academic assistantships or postdocs. Each section should very briefly mention what you did and why. A potential employer wants to see things that will make you useful to them. Be aware that ...


-3

Do what is honest and most advantageous to you in this situation, this is one of those situations where it is acceptable to bend the truth a bit in your favour


3

I think you say HOW you helped the growth, and by how much, especially if it is quantifiable. Was reliably the main customer contact in the office, greeting and giving customer information on llama grooming and how Llamas-R-Us could provide efficient service. While I was at Llamas-R-Us, we grew on average by 40 customers a month and my boss said that 25 ...


3

As a frame challenge, you're overthinking this. Potential employers usually won't know how old you are, unless you tell them. Someone who appears to be in their 30's and has 10 years of solid job history wouldn't really stand out from the pack. If the interviewer even thinks about your age, they might as well just assume you're 32 and started working at 22, ...


4

I'm from a country where its not unusual to have 'informal' jobs. We make money, don't pay taxes, its easy to get one. Why is this a problem from a resume perspective? Resumes don't usually include information about whether you paid your taxes. Are you afraid of your government reading it and collecting back taxes from you? How can explain in my CV ...


3

How to make it not sound bad? Why do you assume it'll be bad? What matters is your claim about your knowledge and expertise and whether you're able to produce results / exhibit capabilities in the interview. How can explain in my CV that i only had 2 jobs, with 5 years experience each? That's an information, and needs to explanation. Yes, if you have a ...


28

Keep it simple: Personal Chef: June 2016 - January 2020 Cannot disclose details due to NDA Worked in a southern state for an athlete. During your interview just make sure to stick to the generic explanation outlined above and focus on your overall skills as a chef. The interviewer might not like it so they'll have to choose whether to believe ...


15

Other answers are good. I would suggest reaching out to your client and asking for assistance in finding a gig. The logic is that they have somewhat limited your employment options, getting in return excellent service and discretion.


125

They had me sign a very specific NDA where I could not state location, details of diet, heath, salary...not even disclose WHOM I WAS WORKING FOR. That's not as outrageous as you seem to be making it, I can't imagine that anyone hiring a personal chef would want that person to go on and put on their resume: "I worked for XYZ FAMOUS PERSON and had to ...


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You can still put the job in your resume, however instead of a detailed description, you would put a disclaimer like "Unable to disclose due to legal reasons". This will alert whoever is reading your resume that you simple cannot discuss the details, but you were still employed. Its better than having a large gap in your resume and having a generic job ...


-1

You are interviewing for an executive position (that's what the "C" in CTO means). Executives are expected to think clearly about interpersonal relationships in the workplace. Why? Executives generally succeed when the people in their companies succeed, not by their own skills as individual contributors. It's kind of a Zen thing: "the only way an executive ...


13

At first, I found the question impolite. It's not. It's a perfectly normal and reasonable question to ask and it's one you need to be prepared for. Lying is a terrible idea. Also I find it to be a double standard, since it was a start-up, and most start-up I know have a 1 year employee turnover. While turnover is usually higher at start-ups, this ...


1

The problem you have is that while a short stint at one company is understandable, three short ones in four years will make most managers suspect one of the following: you use job-hopping to get higher salaries, something about you doesn't fit into the team wherever you go, you don't know what you really want and change jobs trying to find the magic fit (...


3

You can't justify it as not shopping around because you are. You're shopping around for a job that suits your family needs, has decent management, isn't financially sinking etc.. What you aren't doing is shopping around to get the highest pay which I assume is what the CTO thought. I agree that it was a bit out of place for an interviewer to accuse a ...


1

If there was something, “X”, that is easy to lie about and get away with it, you can bet good money that there would be lots of people doing that and lying about X in their resumes. Employers would eventually realize that a lot of job candidates give information about X that is impossible to verify during the hiring process but leads to hiring people who ...


1

There's a false binary choice here - you can get a job honestly or you can fail to get a job dishonestly in addition to the two possibilities you seem to be considering. Being dishonest is as likely to result in no job as in getting one. The best outcome is to obtain a job honestly - if that means providing additional evidence of what you're good at doing, ...


5

Here are a couple of steps. I don't like the term 'lying', so we'll go with "how do I fluff up my resume and myself so I look more attractive to my potential employers', if that's OK with you. I think credentials matter a bit in this context, so I'll put them in. I'm currently a SE, been working for 5+ years right out of college. I've been deeply involved ...


2

You have some experience which puts you in a better position than some. You must have contributed or learned something in that 6 months of employment. Rather than lying, enumerate that list on your resume and discuss your duties during the interview. Best of luck!


8

How can I enhance my resume to increase my chances to getting another job? I realize I can’t lie about testable stuff, but what is hard to test in an interview? One friend suggested that I talk about micro services and such as they can’t easily test that. As a rule of thumb, I suggest you never lie or include false statements in your Resume. Most likely ...


0

You asked, I'm explicitly not asking if this is a good or bad idea, but if there is a common and at least somewhat accepted way of doing this. The easiest way this is done is indirectly. Rather than worry about what to leave off. focus on only including things that you can justify including. In other words, include items that fall into one of two ...


2

First of all, you can't. As a very simple example, your name gives clues as to your gender and heritage. Your name is "Michael Kunst", therefore I assume you are male because your first name is Michael, and have a background coming from somewhere in north-central Europe (near Germany), because your name sounds German. Even if the name "Michael Kunst" is a ...


0

Next to every great answers you already have I would add that you can't realy because who tend to discriminate on gender or origin could also discriminate you based on your attemp to be as inclusive as possible in your resume. My point is that if someone wants to discriminate people based on their CV they will always find a way to do so.


3

The other answer and comments miss the point. There are many ways to determine age, gender, and heritage that have nothing to do with stating something like “I am a black woman who is 55.” Plenty of other info can reveal it. The other answers are also mostly from the perspective of developers. I can apply for a couple jobs and have interviews in a week, ...


0

It is difficult to make a truly neutral CV because : Your experience length and diploma dates hints your age quite exactly Your name can disclose your gender, perhaps sometimes heritage Even if you don't include name or shorten experience some details about you can be found out by checking your contact or finding out on social media so you'd have to make a ...


1

In Europe, there are laws against discrimination. In any case, you don't have to tell in your CV anything you don't want your employer to know. Obviously, hiding the gender will be somewhat difficult, because it can be inferred from the name. Hiding the heritage or racial features is plausible if in your country there's not a custom of putting a photo in ...


10

Is there anything else to be considered, and are there any established ways on hiding these information? You don't need to hide anything, none of the points you mentioned - Gender, Heritage and Age should have a place in a traditional CV. You can (and you should) leave them off. Use the real estate for more relevant information. Regarding the ...


2

I generally consider a CV to be a full work/academic history while a Resume is a summary of the most recent/relevant information. I'm sure some other people share the same definitions. I would generally send a Resume even if asked for a CV because people who read 100's to 1000's of resumes a day don't want to read dozens of pages of boring details dating ...


0

I'm not sure that Linked In, specifically, has this functionality, but a way to denote this without being deceptive, but to be able to put the link out there earlier rather than later is to say something like: Accepted for (blah blah) internship for Dates X through Y And put it under "other awards/experience" rather than positions you've held. You did, ...


2

Generally it is the same, but this is context-dependent I had one case where a grant application wanted a CV, defined by them as "a comprehensive listing of everything from awards to employment." I sent my 10-page master resume listing everything back to the last two years of high school and that is apparently what they wanted. If it is for regular ...


11

I'm from the UK. So far as I'm aware, we consider them to be different words for the same thing. I would call it a CV personally, and consider "Resume" to be the American-English version, but I'm sure that varies from place to place.


1

No, the last position is the last position you held, irrespective of the duration. Mention the last position you had, and if asked, be ready to explain why you left the last time. You can however, use the cover letter to explain that the last stint with the organization was rather brief, due to personal reasons and add a bit about the previous position ...


5

You were at the very least misleading. At least once you've started to question yourself, you'd be at least borderline lying and after reading this answer intentionally misleading (with a possible way out). If this came up in an interview I'd (likely) reject you for being dishonest or at the very least unprepared and unclear in your communication. At the ...


0

It depends on how your CV is going to be read, and bear in mind that it can be read many years from now. In Colombia some politicians had in their CVs information about education that was only misleading (as yours). They didn't actually claimed to be a doctor, but they reported in their education dates and institutions for doctorate studies. Notable cases, ...


1

You might, but it is part of the double standard surrounding educational experience vs other experience. Leave it be. Would you put when you cost your company $250,000 because of a mistake on your resume? No. Even if it caused them to think that everything went perfectly at your job? Still no. Would you put that you have a criminal record on your resume? ...


1

Did you lie? No. Were you misleading? Somewhat. Is what you did going to be a problem? Probably not, but it depends entirely on the employer and industry you're in. There's not a definitive answer, it's all about your circumstances. In my industry (software) you'd be fine. You have previous experience and the hired you on that. No one cares where you went ...


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