Hot answers tagged

162

If that customer wanted to give a communal tip then they would have put it in the communal pot. So, that was a personal tip, or present, to you, keep it.


155

Whether you can decline service to a customer is a question for your manager, because quite aside from any location-specific legal concerns, businesses differ in their handling of problem customers. I recommend going as a group since he makes a bunch of you uncomfortable. Either individually or as a group, though, be sure to report this harassment to your ...


143

She does actually have a contract, even if not even a verbal contract was discussed. She has a contract because she turned up for work, and they let her work instead of sending her home. It’s small claims court, and if she is really annoyed she can call HMRC, tell them that she was working for this company and ask them to check whether the company paid her ...


100

Unless the issue is being followed up on by the police, the matter is closed. Fast food is entry level work and presumably you are seeking to obtain similar work, so just leave the job off your resume and apply to other places. You may want to change your username for this question, as I Googled the name you have and can match certain identifying ...


81

You should talk to your supervisor. Tell them this man makes you very uncomfortable and what he has done and tell your superior you don't want to help this man. Use the term sexual harassment - that usually gets an employer's attention. If the supervisor says you must then talk to his supervisor. If that does not work you can just refuse to help and see ...


63

This is something that, unfortunately, is not uncommon in retail. The core advice you're getting from almost everyone is correct: talk to your supervisor. The following assumes you are in a major retail chain (or one that acts similarly to a major retail chain in terms of its organization). Small stores will of course have much less bureaucracy. This is ...


45

You may be obliged to share the tip, make sure that's not the case with your employee handbook. If the rule is that all the tips are to be shared amongst the staff, you likely may have to share this one too, as even though it was delivered personally, it's still tipped for the service provided in the store. If that's the case, clear it with your manager. If ...


37

This is really terrible for you and your partner - you have my sympathies. While a verbal contract is still a contract in UK law (and therefore your partner would be entitled to the wages as agreed) the problem comes from proving it. Unless she has some supporting documentation as to the fact that she was employed and the hours worked it will come down to ...


30

Rachel - the original question was about "how to respond during an interview" and you seem to have some meaningful comments about that part so far. But now, the question seems to have veered a bit toward "When I submit an application (not a resume, not an interview), they specifically ask 'Were you fired or terminated from a job?' How should I respond in ...


26

There is really no good way to persuade a potential employer that you were indeed wrongfully terminated. You say: "They fired me because of harassment accusations which were completely false." They think: Sure, that's what everyone says who harasses people at work. You say: "I am currently pursuing legal action against the company." They think: Is that a ...


24

I'm assuming you were just caught and fired on the spot. If so, that is likely the end of it. Unless you were arrested, indicted, found guilty, or have a warrant out for your arrest, you should be OK. Otherwise, if it was a juvenile conviction, your "record" goes away when you reach a certain age (or so I'm told - this may vary depending on which state you ...


14

A couple of days after completing initial training is not long enough to be worrying about this. But, if you are worried about forgetting steps in procedures, start coming up with ways to help remember them - write it in a checklist or, for simpler things, make up a little song or story and act it out. In any event - practice makes perfect, and you will ...


13

If the manager is setting her up for failure, then this advice may not help. This will only help if the manager is just careless and not paying attention to the jobs that need to be done. Ask the manager (soon) for how to handle possible situations that might occur, where a manager usually deals with the issue. The following are some questions she should ...


12

(This is my comment expanded as a full answer because thedarkwanderer suggested it. It's almost a duplicate of HorusKol's answer, but I think it's different enough to count). tl;dr version: The job requires skills, skills are learnable. Consider seriously trying to learn them before deciding whether to quit or transfer. I see in your question that all the ...


12

My advice to you... Walk tall. Go in, do your work, don't fret about your tooth. It's a temporary situation. It's very possible someone will ask you about it, especially if customer contact is important to your job. If this does happen, just explain... "Yeah, I'm missing a tooth. Have a denture for it, but it's missing. This will be resolved tomorrow....


11

In most cases you can't be obligated to come in when you aren't scheduled, but it helps your manager when you agree to. My guess is that if you are generally willing to help out when you can, and you explain to your boss when you can't (today I have an obligation), then your manager will most likely appreciate it and it probably won't affect you negatively.


11

There are good advices in this answer, just adding a specific point: From my own small experience in a big well known fast-food brand when I was student (starts with "Mc", actually in France but I assume it's the same in other countries), they keep internal records of past employees and share them at least nation-wide. So if it's a big fast-food brand you ...


11

There's some people who have a tradition of giving gifts to common service people at the holidays-- my family always leaves an envelope with a tip for our milkman and used to tip the paper delivery, when we got the paper. I would count this as a holiday gift from a regular customer. Unless your employee handbook specifically requires you not to keep it, or ...


10

I work a retail job in a general store. I'm a teenager. I'm going into my first year of college in a few weeks. A few things here which make it not a factor: You are a teenager, your college experience is way more important than your high school jobs. Having a job period is what is important there, not why you quit You are going to college, most people ...


9

If this was individually addressed and provided in a sealed envelope, it sounds like you received a gift, not a tip, even if it's to reward your service. However, if you feel it should be split, split it - sharing with your coworkers is pretty great and it seems clearly at least as ethical, if not more. I'd first bring it up to your direct superior in case ...


8

It is unlikely. The manager knew this was your first work assignment and offered you the position anyway. In addition this sounds like a seasonal position. Companies regularly take on people for these short term positions that might not otherwise qualify for a full time position with the company. Many times it is this type of position that lets them ...


7

First and foremost, if your housing situation and well-being currently depends on you keeping your job, do not quit your job. Being homeless sucks, and makes job searching that much harder. As for transferring, keep in mind that the manager of your Starbucks will likely know the manager(s) of the actual Starbucks's nearby, and could recommend that you not ...


7

Depending on what your company offers, there may be a "flex" time arrangement where employees can work part-time or work flexible hours (usually outside of normal business hours). You should research if such a policy exists and if it does, then approach her and ask if it's possible to reduce your work hours. If there isn't a policy, then you, her, and HR ...


7

This is fairly routine in the UK, especially in retail. It's like the infamous "Zero hours contract" you see in the news, but slightly better. In a zero hours scenario you work a certain number of paid hours per week, but they don't promise you will get that every week (although you may). This is easier than paying people off when demand dips, you just ...


7

Is it unprofessional to quit so soon? Yes-- but if the job is causing you serious problems, it may be worth doing anyway. I would advise you to simply tell them that the time you've spent on the job hasn't lived up to your expectations and you don't believe you can continue working there-- but think hard about this, since you can't take it back. If you do ...


7

This is very sad that this kind of problems exist and they exist all over the world. Stand for your case, your partner has a legitimate claim for money here. While not based in UK I can only give a general advice, but I hope it may be of some help. Some employers(1) tend to think young people, fresh to the job market will not take action upon being ...


7

Without knowing the exact jurisdiction it's hard to comment on the legality of the situation. However in the general case if the two franchises are seperate legal entities (regardless of whether they have the same owner) then what the owner has done is the correct way to do things. Tennessee isn't somewhere I'm super-informed on but IIRC it may well be ...


7

we typically split the tips on a weekly basis. My question is: should I split this tip with other baristas? Am I ethically / morally wrong, if I kept this individualized tip all to myself? It seems clear to me that the protocol is to split tips. But if you think having someone put it in an envelope makes it an exception, talk to your boss and ask.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible