Hot answers tagged

289

Bottom line, L is risking your health and creating liability for the company. Personally, I wouldn't want to swim anywhere where the lifeguards are fatigued. While I will always remind people that HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND, this is one case where your interests, and HR's interests align. IF something happens due to fatigue, or if someone decides to sue, your ...


266

DO NOT DO THIS You are interviewing at a bank. They SHOULD know better than to ask you for this information. It is possible that they believe your "bank account card" is just a simple "EC card" which may not contain any security features. They may not be aware that there are some banks that use a single card for transactions as well as for bank purposes. ...


224

Yes. Call OSHA and describe what went on. If you have photos/videos, this will help reinforce the fact. There's no need to advise your prior employers that you're doing this. Just follow the advice of OSHA when you call them. Be prepared that your prior employers might have moved their operations or tightened up their safety since you left. I'm sure ...


205

1000 pounds (450 kg) on wheels, I would want to see the wheels. Unless it is proper wheels designed to move this thing around, that's problematic. Not dangerous if you are careful, but something I'd avoid. 450 kg on wheels up a steep hill is DANGEROUS. Something I would definitely refuse. Once you are three quarters up the steep hill and lose control, you ...


159

As an aside for the future, I would suggest you do something drastic to make a change in management. This type of "tell you professional movers will be used, and then on the last day tell you that it's gonna be you instead" bait-and-switch is a sign of management that is 100% okay with doing anything if it saves them money. I really doubt they legitimately ...


136

Is it safe to do so? Based on my experience this is not normal practice and not safe. The company doesn't need a copy of your debit card in order to pay you. There are several security concerns when faxing, emailing, or sharing this information in general. What I would do is provide my checking account number and routing number so they can pay me. If ...


126

Tell him one last time to stop doing that. Be firm and straight, don't beat around the bush. Don't get involved in any discussions. If he continues doing it go straight to HR and let them handle it. You might also want to consider to talk to a lawyer. I think his behavior is borderline stalking, which is a criminal offense in Germany. Regarding taking ...


123

Find a new job. Now. You have a love for automotive work and that is great. There are hundreds of thousands of shops across the country that you can work in. But what you are describing is arguably worse than your boss being a cheapskate. He simply doesn't know what he is doing. And this is extremely dangerous, even deadly in certain professions. You ...


121

If this is a company in the USA, in an industry that falls under OSHA review, then the following may apply. Items over a specific weight (50 lbs(23kg)) are considered hazardous to lift. Several options for moving heavy items are available, but most require training or certification. Pallet jack/hand truck - used up to rated weight can be safely operated ...


117

I guess I have some occupation-specific feedback on this. I was a lifeguard at facility pools and a large public beach for many years. It is standard policy to rotate lifeguards regularly, including "down-time" for a reason. If a lifeguard gets mentally stale, bored, or zones out, people can DIE. If the manager does not act, you have to go to other ...


108

How can I address this issue properly so that no one gets hurt? You, and your team, should refuse to have any involvement in the move of the heavy equipment. It's that simple. An accident WILL happen, someone WILL get hurt or worse. You are not trained to move, and expecting you to move heavy equipment when you are not competent in how to move it is ...


107

You seem to have your options pretty well covered. In any chain of command, when you don't get satisfaction, you move up. It seems to me that's what you need to do. Don't demand anything though. If your regional boss doesn't help then perhaps the theme park should know. If nothing still changes, perhaps you should tell OSHA. I don't characterize it as "...


102

How should I report someone who makes a potentially dangerous joke on the job? After giving it some more thought, I'm going to ask my agency why this time there wasn't a memo about firearms on set as there had been one each other time. If your goal is to attempt to get your agency to notify actors in writing about prop firearms on the set, then ...


98

People who don't get adequate breaks tend to not pay attention to their job as well. People who are really hungry also don't pay attention well. This is an accident waiting to happen. As Patricia Shanahan pointed out in a comment, you can fix the lunch issue by closing the course for a short time while everyone eats lunch. As for the other breaks, to ...


89

They are on wheels, but they will need to be pushed out onto a side walk and up a pretty steep hill to a truck that I'm told will have some kind of lifting machine on the back of it. The truck will be rented and one of us will be expected to operate it. None of us has any experience doing anything like this. The highlighted bits are huge red flags ...


70

You can't. First, the problem you describe is 100% about the situation in which you're working, and 0% about the person with whom you're working. So any approach which mentions a specific person (along the lines of "I'm not comfortable working with you in the server room") shifts the focus away from your actual problem, and will cause an implication that ...


69

First you should think long and hard about what you want to report. OSHA has many rules and many more guide lines. For example: The shop is a toxic mess. - This is not actionable; you need to be specific. They openly burn Styrofoam with little to no ventilation. - Depending on where they are in FL and how the building/area is setup the EPA may care and ...


64

If you file a complaint with the OSHA then the OSHA will not share your personal information with your employer: OSHA will keep your information confidential. So you should be safe from retaliation if you file a complaint.


64

Aside from the spot-on answers already covering this from a safety perspective, here's something else to consider that might make more of an impact on an unsympathetic manager. The bulk/weight of these machines, the incline, the lift into the truck, and the unfamiliar lifting machine all contribute to the safety hazards already discussed. These safety ...


49

Do your own research first. There are online maps that show crime statistics by neighborhood and location. (for example https://www.adt.com/crime , there are many others). Look at local news and police reports. If it's really as dangerous as they say, it should show up there. If not, it's a prank (which this does indeed sound like). If it's really as ...


45

NOPE! BIG RED FLAG! The information on both sides of your card is enough to put some nasty charges on your account. People interviewing at the bank should absolutely know better. The person who asked this of you (it might not be the interviewer) could well be a rogue employee. Either that or they are gauging how susceptible to social engineering you might ...


42

tl;dr - You are correct that action needs to be taken, but you are looking at the wrong solution To clarify, they DO sometimes have real guns on set and ALL GUNS (including plastic ones) LOOK REAL. This is why I think it's important for this to be communicated to everyone in advanced, and usually it is but this time it wasn't. I am not familiar ...


42

One of HR's main mandates is ensuring that the company is in legal compliance in how they handle their employees. Your young, inexperienced manager doesn't see this as important and is taking risks and making messes because of it. Either it's found out prior to the company being cited for underpayment and HR/payroll has a huge headache sorting it out or ...


41

Talk to the OSHA about this. They'll be able to advise you confidentially about how to progress this concern for health and safety. They doubtless get a lot of inquiries from concerned employees who are also afraid for their jobs and livelihoods. Contact them, describe the situation (and your fears for your own job) and take their advice. That's what ...


36

You are right in saying that this affects the public, but it is more than that - it also affects you as you are also subject to those same shocks. So this is clearly a workplace violation and you should inform OSHA asap as you have clearly tried to do the right thing, but have been ignored to date. See Occupational Safety and Health Administration - ...


29

The best way to protect against a scam is to walk away from the start. It doesn't matter what they're trying to pull here, it screams "suspicious" and you just should not get involved. It might even be that the documents are legit this time, and they're just hoping to lull you into a false sense of security for a next time. There is no reason why you, a ...


28

First, lets get this out of the way: It's not illegal, just the absolute minimum they can legally get away with. UK Law mandates one 20-minute rest if working more than a 6 hour day, even if the shift is 12 hours long: https://www.gov.uk/rest-breaks-work So what should you do? The only thing you can: Politely make management aware of your concerns (as ...


28

Be direct. At this point, don't ask him to stop politely tell him to stop. You don't need to justify the reason at all. When he comes to you at work, before anything is even said, ask it is work related. If they say no, simply tell them you are too busy and to please leave you alone. As for this person putting stuff online about your personal life, you ...


27

I am not an attorney, but I'd bet money that your employer cannot make you waive your legal rights under Missouri state law.. here's an excerpt: 563.031. 1. A person may, subject to the provisions of subsection 2 of this section, use physical force upon another person when and to the extent he or she reasonably believes such force to be necessary to ...


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