Hot answers tagged

267

DO NOT DO THIS You are interviewing at a bank. They SHOULD know better than to ask you for this information. It is possible that they believe your "bank account card" is just a simple "EC card" which may not contain any security features. They may not be aware that there are some banks that use a single card for transactions as well as for bank purposes. ...


137

Is it safe to do so? Based on my experience this is not normal practice and not safe. The company doesn't need a copy of your debit card in order to pay you. There are several security concerns when faxing, emailing, or sharing this information in general. What I would do is provide my checking account number and routing number so they can pay me. If ...


110

What should I do? You should maybe take an hour or so to get your version of events clear in your head so you know exactly what happened, then go straight to the police and file a report, clearly stating the facts, and leaving emotion out of it. You should file the same version of events with HR, advise that you have filed a police report, and state that ...


70

You can't. First, the problem you describe is 100% about the situation in which you're working, and 0% about the person with whom you're working. So any approach which mentions a specific person (along the lines of "I'm not comfortable working with you in the server room") shifts the focus away from your actual problem, and will cause an implication that ...


49

Do your own research first. There are online maps that show crime statistics by neighborhood and location. (for example https://www.adt.com/crime , there are many others). Look at local news and police reports. If it's really as dangerous as they say, it should show up there. If not, it's a prank (which this does indeed sound like). If it's really as ...


45

NOPE! BIG RED FLAG! The information on both sides of your card is enough to put some nasty charges on your account. People interviewing at the bank should absolutely know better. The person who asked this of you (it might not be the interviewer) could well be a rogue employee. Either that or they are gauging how susceptible to social engineering you might ...


26

Someone I know works in a multi-storey building, and their evacuation plan for those who cannot safely evacuate themselves (e.g. wheelchair users, people with broken legs in casts, etc. who become stranded when the fire safety systems lock out the lifts) is to have the fire wardens escort them to special areas of the building called refuges. They are ...


24

In since-deleted comments, OP specifies Michigan and alludes to a particular location. I am familiar with "dangerous Michigan locations". First, I'm going to make a broad, inclusive statement about all Michigan cities with 600,000 or more population. They "all" look like donuts economically, with depressed inner cities, but very robust suburbs. ...


23

You are looking at the issue from the wrong side... Working alone in a soundproof noisy room full of heavy equipment is extremely dangerous: the colleague with you is your safety belt, be grateful he's with you! Other answers propose surveillance cameras that could help in case of an accident: these cameras would not be manned 24/7 so should a server drop ...


22

At my last job (big company, occupied full buildings), they had EVAC+CHAIR at the stairways. These are operated by two people (or, apparently, only one might be enough), can be assembled quickly and are able to go down the stairs fairly quickly. We had an emergency squad of volunteers who were trained in how to use those. (They would also help coordinate ...


20

No one 'broke into the backdoor' it wasn't locked. Having your stuff stolen is upsetting to everyone, but best not to let it make you too frustrated and take it out on innocent people, rather learn a lesson from it. This can happen at any workplace, even offices in the middle of buildings. You need to be careful with your valuables at all times, do not rely ...


20

The request from the bank is NOT scam. Seems like the OP is talking about a so called "Debit-Bankomatkarte" which indeed have a CVV. But I still think that the employer in question did not mean that card. It is more likely that the the employer isn't aware that OP already got this new card (because those cards are kinda new in Austria). [please note I'm ...


19

IMHO, sounds like a scammer phishing for personal information. No employer needs your card for payroll setup. Bank information provided on the first day of employment when filling up the forms does that. DO NOT SEND them these pictures and no more personal information. Instead, start researching the party you are in communication with.


17

You need to seek legal advice, and to document everything you can remember immediately.


17

What should I do? Go to the police. You were physically assaulted and suffered permanent damage. This is not something to be taken lightly and is on a completely different level than a few bruises from a friendly fight. a) you were attacked against your will. This makes it legally an assault or a comparable crime. You didn't add a country tag, but in many ...


16

There are two things here: 1. Not carrying the laptop home That's okay, as long as you're not expected to access some work resource for which you might need the laptop, it's perfectly fine not to carry the laptop back home (for safekeeping purpose only). The office should provide an option for safekeeping workplace-related valuables. 2. The ...


14

One other possibility - if you have home insurance, check your policy and see whether it includes any cover for this situation. Despite the name, some "home insurance" policies do include loss of personal effects outside home.


14

Leaving the door open is most definitely NOT the solution. That is a blatant security risk, and if anyone with responsibility for security found the room in that state, IMO you would deserve instant dismissal if that was the outcome of the disciplinary procedure that followed! My own employers have a scheme where anyone who has concerns about their personal ...


14

I find this a bit extreme since I'm staying in the states, but people are fairly serious about it. Are any of these warnings warrented, is this common in workplace travel? The United States is no exception when it comes to crime. There are dangerous areas ( i.e. areas where more crimes occur ) in the US so the warnings may be warranted. As with any travel,...


12

The best thing to do is ask for an explanation and provide appropriate information. In all likelihood, your employer is working to set up payroll for you. It doesn't hurt to make a quick call or email to a recruiter or manager inquiring about the request. You can always phrase your question as "I want to make sure I get you the right information, can you ...


11

My work can take me all over the world. For some areas I would get a personal security detail, for others the guidance is to absolutely not go, and for others there is guidance on avoiding pickpockets or certain areas of town. Coming from a country that does not have guns, this can raise all sorts of concerns. Many cities in the US seem very dangerous to me ...


11

I've tried making up an excuse that it's too warm with the door closed, I've tried saying that I'm just more comfortable with the door open, but he keeps closing it. This line alone tells me all I need to know about your qualifications to work in a server room. First of all, keeping the door close will keep the cool air in and makes the room cooler. ...


10

If you want to bring it up to them directly, I would focus on you don't like being in enclosed spaces. Adding him to your reasoning is not going to do anything productive and will likely backfire and cause HIM to make an HR complaint (as many here would recommend to get ahead of potential issues). You could also bring it up to your boss/supervisor and ...


9

If am asked to drive a car in a similar situation, how I can politely say that there is a severe safety concern and they need either to fix it or rent me a car? Say no. In this case, I would simply say no, and either take an uber or rent a car -- period. My safety is worth more than any job. A vehicle that is not functioning properly (mechanically) ...


9

First of all, no--they're not becoming increasingly common. They're becoming increasingly reported on. Big difference. America is as safe as ever. Second...if you're truly worried about it, plan in advance. Think where you'd go for cover. A closed room, one you can lock, away from doors and windows. Think about what you could get behind. My ...


7

This is completely ridiculous. You'll be going to a place of business, presumably during the day, and I assume you'll have a rental car - there is nothing to fear. Make sure you have the address you'll be going, and have directions. Don't leave anything in the car, or if you do, put it in the trunk. Make sure you lock the car. Sure, there are areas where ...


6

OSHA dictates PPE must be provided where risks occur and that the employer must pay for it. The employer is responsible for assessing the PPE requirements for performing work in the workplace and following through on providing it. Failure to comply has major financial and reputational consequences. Should your employer not take worker safety seriously an ...


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