Hot answers tagged

267

DO NOT DO THIS You are interviewing at a bank. They SHOULD know better than to ask you for this information. It is possible that they believe your "bank account card" is just a simple "EC card" which may not contain any security features. They may not be aware that there are some banks that use a single card for transactions as well as for bank purposes. ...


138

Is it safe to do so? Based on my experience this is not normal practice and not safe. The company doesn't need a copy of your debit card in order to pay you. There are several security concerns when faxing, emailing, or sharing this information in general. What I would do is provide my checking account number and routing number so they can pay me. If ...


110

What should I do? You should maybe take an hour or so to get your version of events clear in your head so you know exactly what happened, then go straight to the police and file a report, clearly stating the facts, and leaving emotion out of it. You should file the same version of events with HR, advise that you have filed a police report, and state that ...


44

NOPE! BIG RED FLAG! The information on both sides of your card is enough to put some nasty charges on your account. People interviewing at the bank should absolutely know better. The person who asked this of you (it might not be the interviewer) could well be a rogue employee. Either that or they are gauging how susceptible to social engineering you might be....


26

Someone I know works in a multi-storey building, and their evacuation plan for those who cannot safely evacuate themselves (e.g. wheelchair users, people with broken legs in casts, etc. who become stranded when the fire safety systems lock out the lifts) is to have the fire wardens escort them to special areas of the building called refuges. They are ...


22

At my last job (big company, occupied full buildings), they had EVAC+CHAIR at the stairways. These are operated by two people (or, apparently, only one might be enough), can be assembled quickly and are able to go down the stairs fairly quickly. We had an emergency squad of volunteers who were trained in how to use those. (They would also help coordinate ...


19

IMHO, sounds like a scammer phishing for personal information. No employer needs your card for payroll setup. Bank information provided on the first day of employment when filling up the forms does that. DO NOT SEND them these pictures and no more personal information. Instead, start researching the party you are in communication with.


19

The request from the bank is NOT scam. Seems like the OP is talking about a so called "Debit-Bankomatkarte" which indeed have a CVV. But I still think that the employer in question did not mean that card. It is more likely that the the employer isn't aware that OP already got this new card (because those cards are kinda new in Austria). [please note I'm ...


18

I worked for a company that also encourages a "safety moment" before meetings -- it's a common practice and part of the culture. People present on workplace-related safety as well as personal and home safety. The goal is to have people consistently focus on keeping themselves and others safe, so that less accidents will occur. If this is an acceptable ...


18

What should I do? Go to the police. You were physically assaulted and suffered permanent damage. This is not something to be taken lightly and is on a completely different level than a few bruises from a friendly fight. a) you were attacked against your will. This makes it legally an assault or a comparable crime. You didn't add a country tag, but in many ...


17

You need to seek legal advice, and to document everything you can remember immediately.


16

Step 1 is to choose if this is your battle. This feels more like it might be childish antics of the company (or at least some in power) like, “no one is telling ME how to determine and provide what this company needs.” than an outright attack on cleanliness. I could envision HR and management having discussed and that being part of why HR “allegedly” did ...


16

Safety can make or break industrial companies Industrial companies spend a heck of a lot of money every time someone is injured, even slightly. My friend of mine had family in food processing and they had to have someone walk along the factory floor because the workers kept leaning back on their chairs/stools to stretch and falling back and hitting their ...


15

Take PTO, then unpaid PTO, if necessary, until the company comes to its senses. This won't take long at all, especially if a critical mass of employees do so, it effectively shuts the firm down regardless of the firm's position. If you're a little more couragous, and have the resources to afford the blow back, just tell your direct supervisor, "I'll be ...


12

It depends on your country. The link you posted is to the UK site for Farnell. In the UK and US an employer is legally responsible for providing personal protective equipment (PPE). A step you can take is an official letter the head of your company, with a copy to your manager, asking for them to provide the previously requested (adequate) PPE, specifically ...


12

The best thing to do is ask for an explanation and provide appropriate information. In all likelihood, your employer is working to set up payroll for you. It doesn't hurt to make a quick call or email to a recruiter or manager inquiring about the request. You can always phrase your question as "I want to make sure I get you the right information, can you ...


10

When in danger, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout! It sounds like the most fearful person in this situation is the CEO. I fear they're behaving irrationally toward workers. The company's reputation is seriously at risk here. To fire somebody who got sick during a pandemic would make a very compelling story in the media, and that story would ...


8

First of all, no--they're not becoming increasingly common. They're becoming increasingly reported on. Big difference. America is as safe as ever. Second...if you're truly worried about it, plan in advance. Think where you'd go for cover. A closed room, one you can lock, away from doors and windows. Think about what you could get behind. My ...


8

Assuming this is a serious question (something which I am not sure about), you are not in high school anymore. No sane person cares about your taste in music as long as they don't have to listen to it. And no, don't try having your taste in music classify as a coping mechanism or psychological disorder. That just makes you look weird, something you ...


7

It's heavy-handed but not entirely without grounds. I've suffered from RSI, and it was not fun. Getting a better chair/desk/mouse/keyboard/screen/posture setup helped get better. People in deep concentration aren't necessarily taking the best of care of themselves. They'll be fascinated by a programming problem while sitting hunched over for hours. They'll ...


7

You may not know it but I am going to guess that your company has a chemical/cleaing policy by just being in California. https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/hazcom.pdf This is very strict as having an Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for any cleaners/chemicals in a workplace and how they are stored. Because the wipes/soap were not company ...


7

Moreso than any other surface? Numerous surfaces are touched by multiple people every day. That is why offices are being closed and people told to work remotely. Not sure what makes the vending machine particularly special compared to the office kitchen or the bathroom (as let's be honest, handwashing is not always happening there either) or the light ...


7

Get organised - this is the sort of reason unions were invented. If you alone refuse to come in, the boss might feel he has to fire you in order to maintain his authority. However everyone does it, he can't fire everyone without destroying the company. That's the nuclear option though, you can start much softer. Everyone in a team can make their views ...


6

To add to the other answers, it is also possible to build elevators which are safe to use in the event of fire. These have a specially protected lift shaft + equipment, smoke extractors in the lobbies, etc, etc. These are regulated in Europe by EN81-72, and are mandatory in some countries in new buildings.


6

Would it be appropriate to spread awareness to the team by sharing this information during a safety moment (~5 mins) which happens before a meeting? Sure, it's completely appropriate. It seems like exactly the sort of thing your company wants to see during your safety moments. Try to stick with the facts as you know them and avoid being preachy. You ...


6

Today we have a lot of information and data on ergonomics and productivity, as well as injury rates and so on. Sometimes it takes ridiculous forms, where some practices turn into "cargo cult" after dubious results are published. What I think you are frustrated about is that you haven't been told about the extent of these practices and regulations. You ...


6

I don't know what country you're in, or what sick leave rules are typical there. But under the circumstances, you could talk to the trainee and say something like: "Normally I wouldn't be worried about someone in the office having a cold. But with the coronavirus in the city, and my wife pregnant, it's different for me. If you want to take some days off, I ...


5

Don’t do this, some cards have the 3 digit confirmation code on the back . Sending the account number which can also be the IBAN number and a sorting code should be sufficient.


5

I'm surprised nobody mentioned prevention. Prevention is better than the cure. In nearly every workplace related violence, it stems from a disgruntled worker. Your co-worker will be the most likely person to carry out the attack(s). In every case it stems from a history of dispute and problems. It wasn't just "sudden" or "unexpected." There are always ...


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