105

Do you have a good rapport with your boss? Do you think your boss is normally reasonable and fair? If so, then you could go to her and ask why this is an issue. Hey boss, I come in early on Mondays, usually stay later than 5, start working when I get to work, and take less breaks than others. And yet, the 3-6 minutes I am late to work on some days ...


88

In my experience, when boss starts minute counting do the same. if your position is 8-5 - stick to it. Arrive 8am sharp You allowed 1 hours for lunch - take it, even if you use 20 minutes for food, take a daily walk for the rest of time, always good for our sitting jobs 5pm sharp out of the door. if you come in 7.45am - 4.45pm is your time to leave You ...


62

Unless you're making substantially more than your colleagues AND your company is in financial trouble, this isn't about your paycheck at all. It's a communication problem. Ask him bluntly what the real problem is. If he balks, point out that you haven't been paid on time in months. "Are there financial problems? Are you unhappy with my work? I'm getting ...


32

I would advise you to let them know that it would be one way or the other and not declare you won't use their system. If HR requires 9-5 daily then tell them that would mean you don't do any work outside of those set times as it violates their time and attendance policy. It seems clear the company wants to use the time and attendance system as defined. ...


30

Anything that is a benefit to the employee is a benefit to the employer, because it attracts better candidates. An obvious use of salaried non-exempt is in jobs where hours are relatively fixed and the amount of time spent on the job is important rather than the amount of work done. Examples include receptionists, high end retail, high end phone centre. ...


30

Honestly, I'd find another job ASAP. A company's first priority SHOULD be making payroll, even if that means the owners don't get paid. Unless you're an owner or in a top exec position AND the company is in serious trouble AND you're aware of it, you shouldn't have to worry about stuff like this. There are two possibilities here: You're getting jerked ...


28

The HR Manager was extremely worried he would offend me by bringing the smaller offer and I was very gracious for his call and told him that it was a different position and a different end of the industry but I look forward to hearing what they can offer. You are in a pretty good position - their HR director has basically told you, "we really want you, don'...


28

Of course, I have a boss who bristles on those days when I arrive after 8:00. My understanding of being salaried versus hourly, is that one of the “perks,” if you could call it that, or trade-off for not having guaranteed breaks or lunches, and being required to work extended hours without additional compensation, is that I don’t have to sweat ...


22

First, let's gather the facts, according to the limits of this question. You are paid about $10K less than your co-worker, I assume that's a yearly salary difference. Your co-worker was, dubiously, paid more in bonus pay than you, in roughly the exact amount that your bonus was reduced. Your boss did not intend to alert you to this difference. You have ...


21

First off I have to say commiserations - I've been through very similar and it wasn't pleasant. A previous employer of mine operated a similar system and any instances of clocking in late or clocking out early were automatically flagged not only to HR but to the directors as well! Working 5+ hours of unpaid overtime (finishing after 1am) on business critical ...


18

Not paying you once is a bad sign, twice is time to move on. Then contact your local government agency that deals with Labor laws and ask them for help in getting the pay you are owed. Make sure you print out and take with you any proof you have that you worked the days in question before you leave.


16

At this point there's really only 3 paths you can take: 1. Confrontation You document the pay cuts. You've said it's not company policy to dock pay, therefore you can demand that the money be reimbursed, or a clear, official, WRITTEN policy be shown to you. In some countries this sort of thing can be grounds for legal action (because it's not stated in ...


16

Would it be bad form to ask for a raise on the raise since it's now costing me more money? You certainly could explain your situation regarding the insurance tier and ask for more money to at least make you whole. I'm guessing that wasn't intentional, and your employer may be able to do something about it. If that fails, ask if you can decline the $283 / ...


16

Your boss is a jerk. I would remind them of all the items you mentioned in your question. After you do that, I would then ask "is 8:02" really a big deal? If they are still unyielding, which based on what you have stated they will be, then as the other answer points out arrive early. How difficult would it be for you to arrive at 7:55 and shut them up? ...


15

The fact that the company is foreign-owned is irrelevant: you're being paid in local currency after all. Fluctuating exchange rates are not a valid reason to base salary negotiations on. If you feel you're not being paid enough, argue for a merit-based raise: your accomplishments and the value you added to the company in the past year(s). If the US dollar ...


13

If you're employed by Company A, your manager in A gets to make this decision. If Company B is unhappy about it, they can take that up with Company A; the answer may be to have someone else cover B's needs while you're away, or to agree that A won't bill them for the time you aren't working... but either way, it's not your responsibility to negotiate this ...


13

If this stipulation is not written in my contract, how can I ensure the company advances my salary as was outlined in an email? You can't. The company is only bound by what is written in the contract so if this stepped salary is a deal-breaker for you then you need to have it included in the contract. If you receive the contract without the stipulation ...


12

I manage a tech group and I do both plus manage. And I have 3 people that work for me that do both. You are more horse than unicorn but horses still provide more value than the jackasses/donkeys that consume 90%+ of your realm. If you want to get paid more for doing this then get a better paying job. Something at a very small tech or startup. These ...


12

Many of my expenses are online ones. Therefore I face this impact hugely. I would think that you need to look at your online expenses rather than your salary. Your salary stays the same. It's unrealistic to ask for more because you like shopping online. That's basically the same as asking for a payrise because you have expensive tastes. So my advice would ...


11

If the company was paying you either as a w-2 employee or as a 1099 employee they owe you the required form by the end of January. They also have to submit copies to the IRS by the end of February. Check the IRS website and the state taxing agency website for info regarding steps to take. if you haven’t received your W-2, follow these four steps: ...


11

Ask why they did that. Usually there is some annoying (pseudo)legal reason for these things. Something incredibly stupid and petty. Maybe they just forgot. Either way they you'll have to accept the lower salary or they will go "oops, sorry, here is the extra 25€" CC the team lead too, if he is a good team lead he'll be annoyed that HR broke his promise ...


10

Any advice? My advice is: be there by 7:45 and in your seat working by 7:55 take your lunch at the same time every day take at least 45 minutes for lunch AWAY from your desk (eat / walk / whatever... it will increase your productivity) leave at 5:05 I scramble some days to make sure I'm in 10+ minutes before my start time. People who sit near me come ...


9

First off, I'm not a lawyer nor do I reside in the Phillipines so bear in mind this is coming from a more general (and decidedly American) point of view. Contracts are a two-way street. All too often, companies treat them as nothing more than shackles to be put on people working for them without considering that contracts have obligations for both parties. ...


9

Your employer absolutely must be you for every day you worked, up to and includng your leaving day, plus in the UK payment for any holiday that you haven't taken, minus payment for any holiday that you have taken beyond what was due to you. (Say you have 24 holidays a year, and you worked for three months earning six days paid leave, if you took 2 days off ...


9

Your company doesn't have the money to keep someone who seems like a good employee. Now they want to replace someone who was been doing important work with an unpaid intern. I think you should see where this is going, which means you update your CV, update your linkedin profile, and look for a position at a company that can afford to pay you, and other good ...


8

The concept of Paid leave is used in some companies to provide family/work balance. The concept is that, you take days off and the organisation still continues to pay you for the days you have taken off. That way, you can take time off work without compromising on earning for those days. Pseudo family/work balance. i.e, it is the organisation's way of ...


8

Or am I right to question this? Your company should be aware of the United States Fair Labor Standards Act as applies to interns. The FLSA details internship expectations in the United States. I recommend reading the linked summary. A section which will specifically cause you concern is the following: If an employer uses interns as substitutes for ...


8

Explain it to them just like you've explained it to us. Nobody can expect you to just "take it" without even saying anything and all they can do is refuse and make you wait which is what you're already doing. This could be a red flag though that the company is actually failing. You may wish to start looking elsewhere. You don't have to accept anything ...


8

Surely I'm within my rights to have an adult conversation with my company about pay? If it's "rights" you are worried about here, then you are correct - it is your right to have a conversation. Of course it's also the company's right to have a rigid pay structure. And it's their right (correctly or incorrectly) to decide that you are becoming unhappy ...


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