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121

In the end, there are two numbers that count: What you want, and what they are willing to pay. I’m not very good at negotiating in the sense of talking someone into giving me more, which is why I just insist on my number: You: I want X. Them: We only have a budget for X-$10,000. You: I’m sure you can find the money, I want X. Them: That would set ...


85

It doesn't matter how much you like the work if you do not get paid. You work to get money. Employer pays you to work. When you don't get money, they do not get work done. You say you want to ensure you are getting paid after three months. Since your employer do not have the money yet they cannot guarantee that. They may end up bankrupt, out of money. Then ...


59

The problem lays in the fact that my employer told me this week that he is not going to be able to pay me until January, due to some issues with the funding agency ... The first thing you should do is verify the claim. As Ronald Reagan said, "Trust but verify". I would like suggestion/tips about not burning any bridges with this current employer (mainly ...


46

Employment relations are simple: The employee (you) is responsible to work The employer (they) is responsible to pay salary on time How the employer manages that is up to them. There are ways for them to do that. They could take a loan, for example. If they can't get a loan to pay their employees while they wait for funding, well, then the banks know more ...


43

You said, While I understand the need for big companies to have some kind of guideline, this makes any attempt for salary negotiation practically impossible That's not inherently true. What this approach seeks to do is streamline and objectify the negotiation process, not eliminate it. Many employees seem to think that this means their attempts at a ...


23

I was encouraged by some people that I should always counter any offers with a higher one. In this case, would it be advisable to counter an job offer from a company? Only do so if you are not satisfied with the offer given. You say in comments that you are satisfied with it, given the position and your experience, and that it is on or above average, so I ...


14

Is there a way to go around this? Not pragmatically at lower levels and best not to have that discussion, it just marks you as someone who may need to be replaced soon. The implication whenever trying to negotiate is that you may leave if your needs are not met. Certainly at the higher levels though, especially top levels, everything is up for negotiation ...


13

should you tell your interviewer that you're leaving the company because you haven't been paid for 3 months, and for 3 more months you didn't receive a full salary? Only do it when and if asked. Try to keep your answer brief and honest, and stick to the facts (so it does not come out as you venting out with your current employer). Anyways, I feel that ...


11

If you are adamant about working for this large company then you need to stop negotiating grade or salary and start negotiating your qualified position. Prove that you are not some average person and really highlight what you bring to the table and why you will excel in a better position. They clearly have an abundance of people at their disposal so losing ...


10

I'm going to challenge your very first assertion: that you can accurately tell how much net profit an individual employee earned the company. For simplicity, let's say you're in Sales. You're able to figure out how much net profit your sales have earned the company. Awesome! But... Did you figure out how much of your profit was due to a technical person ...


9

There are two things that should tip you off to leave the building and never come back without a written contract my employer told me And althought in some countries the contract is assumed to "be there" in the reflection of the fact that you work it only assume it's existence (so not the type, benefit, pay etc.). So only after proving that such ...


9

You are currently getting exploited. You should negotiate right away something. The something can vary wildly: Stock options (risky because dilution, but could have lots of value) Royalties, based on future revenue. Safest, because revenue is easy to measure and hard to conceal. Profit sharing. Usually easiest to negotiate, because the company only pays ...


9

Welcome to Megacorp. We Excel at Average! There's some merit to their reasoning, but what such policies really ensure is that they average 44th percentile employees. The purpose is to protect against situations like rogue managers who give unreasonably high raises for less than stellar performance. The tradeoff is that they choose to not reward stellar ...


8

Have you ever attempted to run/make payroll for an employee? You don't have a country tag and the currency symbol you use is for a Euro. Here in the US, for an employee with average benefits, it cost about 1.7*salary x to make payroll. That is with an employee paying part of the medical insurance, and a far less generous government pension system (Social ...


8

Don't over-commit. It won't help you, or your current employer. It will only burn you out. A great business owner I once worked for gave me some amazing advice, which is self evident when you think about it: "Don't ever risk your health for my money". Focus on growing yourself, and don't worry about the company you currently work for. They will be fine ...


7

The state of project is not really relevant here. The points you need to consider here are: Are you satisfied with the work and compensation here? Do you see value in the work you do? Is you work/effort valued? Did you try to talk / discuss the scenario/ situation you're currently in with higher-ups and received no positive sign? If the answers of first ...


7

Are they still required to pay me for the hours that I worked even though they rescinded instead of "firing" me? Assuming you are in the US, they are absolutely required to pay you for all hours worked. Once you have started working, there is no difference between "rescinded" and "fired", as far as whether or not you should be paid. If so, how can I ...


7

Normally you negotiate terms before you start working. If the owner of the company filed a patent on the idea you can be pretty sure that he regards the product in the same way a mother regards her newborn infant. You should negotiate the terms of your employment immediately before doing any more work. In a small company compensation is problematic because ...


7

Answer the question is what the candidate should do. The three interviewers will have been empanelled to determine the suitability of the candidate(s) for the role - and that includes considering salary expectations. Even if the technical interviewer wasn't in the room to hear the candidates answer, they will be made aware of it as soon as the interview ...


6

"I feel like it's going to rain today." doesn't mean it's going to rain today. Everything you've stated is conjecture on your part. My advice would be to lobby for the raise you think you deserve for this new position and if you don't get what you ask for then consider either stepping down from this position or find a job elsewhere. There really are no ...


6

I would recommend walking out and not returning; it's bad practice as a consultant/contractor to let employers delay bills like this. If you absolutely feel compelled to stay, at least insist that you be given a written version of the contract before you do further work. If the company fails, or still refuses to pay, this might enable you to use a debt ...


5

The existing answers provide good information for your question, but I feel there is a relevant point missing. Fundamentally, there is a difference between working for a business, and owning a business. This statement may seem so obvious that it doesn't even need to be said out loud, but it speaks to the core flaw in your assumption. You seem to be assuming ...


4

Since didn't list a location, I'll give you an answer specific to Australia, though other countries might have unemployment programs with similar rules. Australia has a government organization called Centrelink that handles all of the payments for various government benefits programs, and one of those programs, the Newstart Allowance, pays unemployed ...


4

I'll play with your stance that "due to some issues with the funding agency, which I truly believe" & "I would like suggestion/tips about not burning any bridges" -which basically means not making any demands/ultimatums to the boss Basically you are hoping for the best, where almost all of the cards and probabilities and anecdotes of similar ...


4

From my experience, they only ease off whenever you decide to move on. Of course, in your area things might be different, I know that here in Canada, IT resources are very rare and they tend to play that game a little bit (we can't offer you more than X) but they really NEED you. Remember that it is a negotiation process and they do it on a daily basis. ...


3

is my boss in all her rights to offer extra hours to the same people and not all her employees In general yes - unless you can prove they are excluding certain people from overtime offers because of some characteristic (e.g. gender, race) that is protected by law where you live then they can offer the extra hours to whomever they like for whatever reason ...


3

It is fairly normal many organisations having a backlog of pay from 30 days to 3 months. However, the job of an employer is being a buffer for those delays, and paying you regularly. If not for that, then you could very well be a consultant and charge 5x more. If they are not upholding their end of contract, then I do not see why you should work for them. ...


3

“Always” is rarely a good idea. If you are given an offer that you feel is too low to accept, counter offer with an amount that you feel is ok. Nothing to lose. If you are given an offer that is so good that you want it, don’t take risks. If you have one offer that you feel is safe: make a counter offer for all offers that you feel are less good. Same ...


2

If you're willing to risk the company retracting the offer and going with another candidate instead because they're unwilling to negotiate (or rather give in to your demands), go ahead. If you consider the offer a reasonable one and you're unwilling to take that risk (and it's a very real risk), accept the offer and work hard to gain a raise or promotion. ...


2

Whether one should always counter or push back may primarily depend on the business segment. I could imagine some lines of business where not countering is seen as weakness. If this is the case, one is probably best advised to follow the culture. In general though, the relationship-building between employer and employee starts during - and especially after -...


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