Hot answers tagged

102

You should absolutely leave. I wouldn't recommend signing anything that has language in it putting responsibilities past the next few months if you don't feel you want to be around past then. First and foremost... Stop giving overtime for free. This is in everybody's best interest. They have a legal obligation to pay you and you are just creating a liability ...


54

If you get treated like a contractor, behave like one. You name the terms that are acceptable to you, and otherwise you don't sign. If you don't want to sign for a long period, but only a short period, you say exactly that. If they want to pay you a very low X, you treat that as a negotiation tactic. Tell them all the risks you have to take, and name your ...


27

To answer the immediate question: there is almost certainly nothing you can say here that will enable you to get a 20 LPA offer for this role. You probably just need to make a choice as to whether you accept the 17 LPA offer or refuse it. More generally, the rule of thumb in salary negotiations is "whoever mentions a number first loses". By ...


21

In addition to what shizoid04 has said, contractors can expect a lot less in benefits than employees. No paid annual leave. No pension contributions. No other subsidised benefits, such as healthcare. A contractor is also contractually obliged to deliver what they say they will. For that reason, contractors expect to be paid substantially more than permanent ...


14

You don't ever mention somebody else's salary. Don't bring it up, no matter what. You are your own person and the focus should always be on you and the value that you bring to the table. But you do use that information to judge what the company is willing to pay people in your role, how much you should negotiate for, and how firmly you should stand your ...


11

Remember that a salary negotiation is a business negotiation. You have something they want (your skills and productivity), and you name your price. Either what you have to offer is worth what you demand, or it's not. The goal of a business negotiation is to come to a consensus about this question. They can make arguments that what you demand is too much ...


10

How can I explain this to my boss without seeming ungrateful? There is nothing ungrateful about asking for what you need. If you can't live on the pay, that's just a fact that needs to be dealt with one way or the other. Just be prepared to get a negative answer. Everyone is struggling, not just you, and there are a lot of well qualified and hard working ...


8

After only 1 1/2 years, it's very unusual to be a "lead developer". Maybe they only have a very small or inexperienced team. Given that, expecting to get the average salary for a lead developer in your area may be wishful thinking. You're comparing yourself with people who may have 10 or more years experience.


8

I understand that this is your question: what I'd like to do is get the shorter (6 month) contract I want, and to be fairly compensated. How would I go about writing an email to my boss that says that this is what I'd like to achieve? Other answers, which are (as of this writing) aimed more at speaking to your general situation rather than this specific ...


7

You're quoting a lot of numbers here, but you're not saying how you got there. I could pull a number out of my butt and say I'm worth a million bucks, but realistically nobody's going to pay me that, and I'm going to have to take a job that's significantly less than what I say I'm worth, if what I say I'm worth is a truly ridiculous number that I got ...


6

Have this discussion with management when you talk about your new responsibilities. Could be a real step up, could be a lateral move or could be just normal growth of your day-to-day work. Have a career discussion with your manager, determine what the next step up for you is, what's required to take the step and how the new responsibility fit in there.


5

Nothing wrong with asking about the grading system, but knowing what it looks like may or may not answer your questions. It's better to ask specific questions: If you want to work in a senior position - make sure you're interviewing for a senior position Negotiate the salary that's right for you What are the growth opportunities for this position? What does ...


5

You deserve to be paid what you are worth. If you are not being paid what you are worth and your colleague is, that makes the negotiation a lot easier: "I have looked at the going rate in the market and it seems the market rate for someone of my skill level is X, and I'm being paid Y; I would like to be paid X if I join the company" (you can do ...


5

I mean you can give it a shot, but I was on the receiving end, I'd fire your ass that instance. It's double the salary today, but what is it tomorrow? May as well gut the whole thing and build a fresh tech stack. If I'm finding it hard to find people, it's likely there needs to be a tech stack refresh.


5

You go and ask for a raise like you would have without getting the 2%. Call a meeting with your manager and ask him what the requirements are to get a more significant raise. Assure him you appreciate his initiative, but you hoped for more, because of stellar performance in project x y and z. Never justify a raise "because others got it, too". Make ...


4

Would be nice if you could elaborate better on "Usually a raise in our company is between 5-15%.". As a general opinion, I'd often say that "someone feeling unappreciated for not getting a raise on the first year" is an absurd complaint. In industries I've worked or known people, either: Nobody gets a discretionary raise within their ...


4

One of those two offers, however, is a significant bump and a few grades higher than the other offer. - They have asked me what I am expecting for salary, bonuses, and Reserved Stock Units (something I've never dealt with before). I am at a loss at how to pick the right values. These statements are in a bit of conflict with each other. You know what the ...


4

"I've researched that average market standard for people of my skills and experience is 20 LPA." The first thing you need to do is throw out "market rate" for programmers. IT/Programming, more than any other job I've seen, is governed by Price's Law: Price's square root law or Price's law pertains to the relationship between the [total ...


4

How feasible would it be to hold my company over the barrel and try to get a mega salary increase? 2x type of thing? It may be possible if you have a lot of knowledge about buggy spaghetti code and undocumented requirements that'd be hard for a brand new team to ever get their heads around. It's less likely if your team used standard technologies in a ...


3

You're focusing on the wrong thing - and if you pursue this angle, it's going to look a bit bad from the other side of the table. Generally, there are three types of jobs: Salaried - where you get paid the same regardless of the number of hours of work you put in. "Paid Lunch' is meaningless here. You get paid the same whether or not you eat a 2 hour ...


3

Only you can stand up for yourself. You are "a former web developer professional who never earned a degree", but if you have the equivalent skills of someone who has a relevant degree, and can produce quality software, you should be able to find something that pays $80K to $150K per year in the U.S., with benefits, depending on where you live. You ...


3

So lots of answers here have told you that you shouldn't sign the a contract for less compensation than you are comfortable with. Doubly true since you suspect that your guestimates were short of the time it will actually take. I agree with that advice completely. However - I suspect it will be a waste of time to negotiate. You say; It is also not a money ...


2

How can I find a job that pays me for the value that I bring? The only way to do this is to be self employed. When you work for or attempt to work for someone else, they will pay you no more than what they believe your value to the company is. It does not matter what you believe, all they are looking at is your previous experience and titles. If you want ...


2

I can't speak exactly on your situation; but, I saw this kind of comment a lot at a former employer. There it was often expressed by coworkers who wanted more money. They didn't want the risks of a new job or they believed (or had been told) that they would not get a raise in their current one (for whatever reason). They wanted their employer to suddenly ...


2

Do your new responsibilities warrant a raise? Answer that question first. If the answer is yes, then ask for a raise to coincide with these new responsibilities. As you've stated, the downside is that they could find someone else to give these responsibilities to. That's a risk you'll need to take if you want the raise. The upside for the company is that you ...


1

As guiding rule - its not what you think you worth, its how much your can get paid on the market. Feeling of being underpaid is common ;) Most people strive to get as much as possible for as little as possible. In my experience, if you feel you worth a certain amount - first check the market rate for that salary and align your skills and personality to match....


1

The answer is: Do some research. You are not worth what you are worth. You are worth what the company would otherwise pay to replace you to do the same job that you would be doing. In other words, you are worth what someone else, doing the same job as you, is worth. So remove your current situation from the equation; the only question to ask and answer ...


1

I don't think this is something to worry or stress about. If you suggest something that is too high its unlikely they will take back the offer. They will just say that's not reasonable and likely tell you why - i.e standard is blah for this role. Equally if you undersell yourself you will be underpaid for a while and then once you have stronger CV can just ...


1

I think you will a better chance of success if you would ask a raise of around 40 percent. And also not phrase it as "I have you by the balls, so pony up" but argue that it is only fair since your workload and responsibilities have grown considerably.


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