Hot answers tagged

21

So, the job is really a perfect fit for me. But the low salary really started to nag on me. How can I get a higher salary without loosing the job opportunity? If the salary isn't what you need/want, then the job isn't a perfect fit. Wait until the end of your current contract. Then, if an extension is offered, indicate the salary you require in order ...


17

Companies have lousy internal pricing systems that make turnover seem a lot cheaper than it is. TL;DR: Raises are very obvious in terms of higher costs. Changes in productivity can often be completely missed or just assigned no value at all. The 5-year tenured engineer has deep knowledge of the internal systems and practices and is more capable of ...


10

Are those three questions no-no to ask during the interview? You can and should ask any question whose answer is important to you. That's the only way you'll know if this is a job you actually want. Hopefully, these weren't the only questions you asked. Hiring managers like to see candidates who are interested in the work and the company, and not solely ...


10

Apply for support. On that salary, you are low income and like it probably says on your diploma, are entitled to all the rights, privileges, and realities of that. I assume you have a utility bill, so start by applying to the Electricity Support Program. I paid all of $20 in utilities during my time studying at Queen's University. It was worth about $700 a ...


9

Before making any decision (on anything significant) it is sensible to find out all you can about the matter using a number of disparate sources. Assuming you ask politely, it's not unprofessional - it's market research. That said, instead of asking "how much does a ... on your team earn" (which could put them in an awkward position from a GDPR/Data ...


9

This does sound like a difficult situation, and you may need to find a new job. To address your individual questions: Is it reasonable for the company to try this kind of thing? I understand why they need to save money but my gut says this is dodgy In general, this is at least not totally unreasonable - asking for pay cuts is not necessarily ...


8

Say "Thank you for this information." Why do you feel you need to make a preemptive declaration of what you're willing to accept? Wait until you're interviewed and offered the position (if that happens). Don't appear to be desperate or willing to accept whatever they offer, unless you actually are desperate and willing to accept whatever they offer. They ...


7

Why do companies give higher raises to engineers that switch instead of engineers that stay? I'm going to quote a part of your post to make my point: Culture was great, I was just beginning to be very productive due to my knowledge accrual, I had developed great relationships with my colleagues. But I just could not turn down the 25% salary increase a ...


6

That information is not needed. It's not illegal to ask for it, but there is no legal reason to do so either. I have never had anybody outside government authorities and banks that give loans ask for a payslip in Germany. What they do need is your social security number, your health insurance number and your tax id. That is a legal requirement because they ...


6

This isn't strictly going to be an answer to the question, but instead some things you should do if you are considering accepting this. Have a lawyer look at the contract. Sometimes contacts like this are a very bad deal for the employee, whether or not that was the company's intention. Since lawyers are expensive, my advice would be to get together with ...


6

All the reasons you give are good reasons why companies should spend more effort retaining their current staff in preference to recruiting from outside. However, some degree of loss is inevitable, if only through retirement and promotion, so companies will always need to hire. Given that: The 5 year tenured engineer has deep knowledge of the internal ...


5

If it is high, people get jealous. I am a software developer and one who recently graduated from university. I don't think it is a surprise that software developers get paid relatively well. Queue the pile of fellow grads in other fields who think that people like myself are overpaid for our experience level while they earn far less as baristas or entry-...


5

This seems like an oddly basic question for someone in a leadership role at this level, and I'll take a stab at how I would address it anyway. Your mileage may vary. First you need to understand the motivation behind the down-grade. It could be something financially motivated. It's also possible that during the interview process the role itself changed ...


4

should I just say I'm happy with the lower end of his range? Two factors making me what to go lower than his range is that they may find someone cheaper who will disclose their range and Also I'm somewhat under qualified for this position (3 years instead of 5 they asked), or is this foolish? Companies don't seek the cheapest candidate they can ...


4

Those questions are perfectly fine. Personally, I would not have expected their answers and I would probably have asked again just to make sure I did not misunderstand their answer and then I might have left the interview early. But that's not on you. The questions are very reasonable and the fact that I think their answers are ridiculous just shows that ...


4

Would it be reasonable to ask for a pay increase? Very reasonable. It's fairly common to pay more for evening or overnight shifts when a job would typically be daytime. Another thing is I would appreciate to get paid more frequently. Would it be fair to request this or is this too unrelated? It's fair to ask anything. It's unlikely they will change ...


3

Send an email back to HR/whoever sent it along these lines: Excuse me, but why are you asking for this information? If there is specific data you need then let me know and I can provide it. Otherwise, I have a policy of not disclosing private details about my employment". Don't create an excuse (eg privacy) which they can try to counter or argue. ...


3

Have you enquired if you can expense the travel between locations or if there is some travel allowance available? Seems reasonable to me that travel required of you during the course of your daily workload should not leave you out of pocket. Alternatively, if you wouldn't need the car for anything else, can you expense cab rides instead? This would cut out ...


3

You need some professional legal advice. The first thing I see is that you are not being offered stock (equity), but rather a stock option. An option is the "permission" to purchase a stock at a specific price at a later date. If the stock goes up, you do well. If the stock goes down, you have nothing. But either way, with an option, it is nothing until ...


3

The only question worth answering here is this one - How should I evaluate the deal being offered? Briefly for the others, it is legal for them to do this, and it is reasonable too. Equally legal and enforceable would be redundancies/furloughs and also pay cuts without stock options. Interestingly, if staff agree at this company, arguing to VCs that that ...


3

Is it reasonable for the company to try this kind of thing? To me it seems as reasonable as can be, the alternative is to plug fingers in ears and hope that everything will be alright. Seems that they are being extremely upfront about the financial situation the company is in and that without cuts it likely will simply not make it, and then the layoffs will ...


3

Is it unprofessional to ask a manager about the salaries of their employees? Yes Is it appropriate to ask them about the salaries of the position that I am interested in? Yes But note these are two very different questions! When you're interested in a job starting the conversation on the topic of salary is common, expected even, and it's absolutely ...


3

You talk to the people who pay you. Which will probably be company B - they'll invoice company A for you, but your contract is with B, even if you turn up at company A each day to work. It's written in your contract.


2

Is it legal.. That depends entirely on where you live and work. Google is your friend here. ... and/or ethical. As long as they are only revealing "piecework" totals - and not base salary - then I'd say it's perfectly ethical. It's completely transparent - it takes something that is a definite and quantifiable measure of productivity and is using it to ...


2

So if employees want to share their pay information, this is legal; in fact, to suppress the sharing of pay information is illegal. IMO, and IIRC from PM Coursework in school... To put into place a model like this is poor organizational management. That concept is how elementary school fundraisers are run, something like a book reading competition, where ...


2

The simple truth is that salaries are about negotiating ability/power more than actual value. The company's negotiating position is much stronger with current employees than with a prospective new employee. Simple as that.


2

The case worker needs to close the case, even if they weren't the ones responsible for you landing the job, so they have a form to fill out that asks for these details. These are run through various statistics internally, to find out what measures were successful in bringing people towards employment, with the goal of ending measures that cause people to ...


1

You already gained a lot (potentially) by not telling what you thought was an Ok salary, but being told that the company is considering a much higher salary range. Coming with low salary expectations doesn't do you any good. Your salary is not the major selling point, what you can do is. Low salary expectations say "I myself believe that I'm not very good ...


1

Not necessarily. Stating your contract rate is equivalent to stating your previous salary. Converting between the two is relatively easy if you know the extra benefits that come with being an employee. You can check the many many other questions on this site about when to state your previous salary, but in general stating it puts you at a disadvantage. ...


1

I have a firm hourly rate already established when I do contract work. Is it advisable to respond with my rate just to establish a range we can negotiate around? Yes, and expect to be countered with a substantially lower number, and do not rush to dismiss it as while employee salaries are lower, they include bonuses like paid time off, which may ...


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