Hot answers tagged

118

You are saying that you have nothing written down and agreed before moving job and all of this was done verbally. Speak to your manager again explaining that the offer you have received is not what you understood it was and you only accepted on the basis of the £50k you agreed. If this has no impact then there might be the avenue of escalating this through ...


94

Call the treasurer. Sometimes email gets lost in transmission, or automatically marked as spam: she could be simply not receiving your email! It's best to resolve this simply if it's a simple problem. Stop performing work for this organization until they've paid you for the outstanding invoice(s). Send a final email to the Treasurer and copy the President ...


64

"Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me." You learned a valuable lesson here: Your manager/boss cannot be trusted. Unless you signed anything already (contract, offer letter, etc.), if I was in your shoes, I would stop working immediately for this liar and would look for a job elsewhere. Of course, always follow the proper procedure, e.g. ...


57

Prior to this conversion they were paying a flat $20.00 per hour for your services. Now they're paying $20.00 per hour and additionally paying things like workers compensation, health insurance, 401k, payroll taxes, etc. None of these costs come out of your $20.00 per hour pay rate. The cost to them is greater than the $20.00 per hour they had been paying ...


49

Any advice for me, please?. You tried sending emails to the Treasurer already, and you have already 2 months due of payment (!). This is what I suggest you do: Sometimes emails aren't as effective as picking up the phone and calling this person. You can also stand up and walk to their office/cubicle if possible. These ways are more efficient in getting a ...


41

There is a difference, but it typically goes the other way. When you are a 1099 you pay both halves of the FICA and Medicare taxes. When you are a W-2 your employer pays half. Additionally, you typically don't get much by way of benefits as a 1099, but you do as a W-2. Whenever I've looked at doing work under a 1099 agreement, I've asked for 25-30% more ...


23

If they made the offer verbally and you accepted and begun working they are required to honour that contract. They have to pay you the amount you verbally agreed before you started, an employment contract does not have to be written down. https://www.gov.uk/employment-contracts-and-conditions/contract-terms You can refuse this new contract as it is a ...


15

Along the lines of Niko1978's answer, but less aggressive. It appears you're trying to work yourself up through life and were handed what looked like a solid opportunity of advancement. It is entirely understandable that you trusted a verbal agreement with your current employer that didn't quite take shape. It really is 'shame on them!' Moving forward, ...


15

What to do? Talk to them and try to get the money they promised. Don't expect it and look for another job. Next time, get things in writing.


14

I tend to add 'References available on request' at the end of my CV. That gives the notion that you will let them talk to somebody if the interview process goes far enough. I think though it also hints you would rather they didn't just go and contact anyone off their own back.


13

How do I go about a telling my boss? First, read your contract and employee handbook and make sure that you are not entitled to be paid for missing the day that you missed. Next, talk to your boss, either in person on the phone or email. Let him know that you were absent on X day and that you were paid ( you can present a copy of the payslip ). Your boss ...


10

I am thinking of sending an email to the president to let her know I have not been paid You should send a reminder to the Treasurer, and CC to the President. While the President paid you promptly, it's not a huge surprise that the Treasurer would manage vendor invoices more slowly. Still, you want to make sure you actually get paid.


10

In my experience, it is always harder (if not impossible) to adjust your low starting salary by getting raises, than it is to start with a higher salary from the beginning. The biggest salary increases I managed to obtain in my career so far were exclusively by switching to another company, and starting there with a (much) bigger salary. I'm sure that, had I ...


9

Rather than the pay on hire being arbitrary, it sounds like your new coworker did a better job negotiating with the company while being hired. There isn't much you can do without rocking the boat, and "S/He gets paid more" is never a valid reason for a pay raise. The best you can do short of finding another company to work for and trying to negotiate a ...


9

Yes. Firstly, it may be in breach of your employment contract or company policy. So you should check that. Secondly, when negotiating pay down the track, maybe at a different company, they could use this data against you. If you feel inclined, do it anonymously.


8

A lawyer once explained to me that, because an exempt salaried worker may be expected to work more than 40 hrs without additional compensation, the employer can expect a worker to work around 40 hrs/wk, but cannot require a minimum of 40 hrs--meaning sometimes it might be more, other times less, but overall it will probably average 40+ hrs. ...


7

Disclaimer: I don't know your country, culture/economics may make my answer not best suited to your case Asking for a raise is your right, and doesn't mean you will leave It is normal to ask for a raise regularly. Of course, you can't ask a 10% raise each month, but an annual raise linked to inflation is, in my opinion, a minimum, as otherwise it means you ...


6

I would suggest two things: Clearly state your target salary at the start Know the current market salary so you don’t price yourself out of range. If your target is in the range of the market salary then this strategy should work. This somewhat assumes that your actual salary is lower than the market salary, but that seems to be the point...


6

It's not that uncommon to use it when it's not formal. It's a way of saying: "It's still open for negotiations". I assume that as soon as the offer transforms to being formal in nature, it will be much more defined. I have also seen it used from companies that pay you hourly. Some months are longer than others, so the pay will fluctuate a little.


5

OTE stands for “On Track Earnings”, meaning how much you can expect to earn including both your salary and a typical amount of commissions. This ad offers to pay you 21-24 thousand, and says you’ll likely be making up to an additional 6 thousand a year in commissions after you’ve been at it for a year or so.


5

So work out your current annual remuneration and negociate the salary they should pay you. If what they offer in terms of salary is too low, then you have two basic options: Stay with the current arrangement, Find another post elsewhere.


4

I agree with @GOATNine's core premise, but I would like to add additional experience and perspective. Aside from leaving or getting a direct promotion, your company may also offer performance-based raises, in which case you can also catch up to or pass your peer's "lead" by doing work that's more highly regarded (because it is directly more valuable, or ...


4

Your employer offered you a certain sum of money, then once you had started, they changed the number, so now you have a problem. Go to them and explain nicely that you had understood that you would be paid 50k and that your most recent pay cheque was only counting up to 45k/year. Remember, it's just a number. There's no need for confrontation or emotion. ...


4

Is there any strategies for soliciting a counter-offer while minimizing risk to my bonus? Unless the bonus is written into your contract, no - apart from keeping quiet until the bonus is safely in your bank account. It's a reward for loyalty. Indeed, the presence of a bonus in a few months time may well worsen the risk that your bluff is called - if they (...


4

If you're changing from hourly to salaried then as you suspected you should be given a new contract that stipulates the new terms of your employment - including what your "basic" working hours are. This figure is then used to work out your effective hourly rate for minimum wage purposes (see here for details and examples). This rate must be at least the ...


3

No-one gets fired because they ask for a pay raise. Not many people get pay raises without asking.


3

Where can I research typical pay rates for this type of documentation? Search for companies that provide RFP-writing services. For example: https://www.thewritersforhire.com/pricing/ This gives you a feel for what a company would pay a company to write RFPs. Since you are not a company, you would likely demand less. You could also look at the "gig" sites ...


3

First Question: Do I ask for a raise for myself and my "integral employee"? When you feel underpaid, you should seek a raise. There is nothing wrong with informing your boss that you believe you're worth significantly more and are unhappy with how your paid. You can inform the owner that you will look elsewhere if you don't get an adequate raise as long as ...


2

Negotiation skills are a soft skill a company might deem as part of communication skills and so the higher paid employee is actually a better candidate - hence the pay discrepancy is justified.


2

What should I do? Do nothing. There are many possible reasons for the new hire getting paid more than you such as: Their educational background is a better fit for the position They have some form of prior internship/work experience that you do not They demonstrated a greater knowledge relevant to the position during their interview than you They ...


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