Hot answers tagged

92

Your wife's salary should never be point of discussion in your own salary negotiation. For good or bad. It's about you, your part in the success of the company and your compensation for this. Bringing up your wife's salary is also fishy since you mentioned your wife is working in a different department. Your boss should not even know what your wife makes or ...


83

Be clear about your goals before you negotiate Every successful negotiation starts with defining what "success" means. What is the desired outcome, what are the minimum outcomes you are willing to accept and what are your non-starters? It's a bit unclear what you want: If you already have a one foot out the door, your goal should be to keep the ...


29

Longer notice periods are very common for more senior/valuable staff as it helps with continuity and knowledge transfer should someone decide to leave - and usually the employee is compensated by a commensurate wage and the extra safety net that a longer term gives them if they need to start a job search when they weren't expecting it. In the situation you ...


13

I like nvoigt's answer, and your boss certainly threw the most irrelevant points, but there is an argument that neither of you were quite right. No raise in relation to the cost of living means that your employer will be at a disadvantage compared to the market rate. Whether it allows you to maintain your quality of life is something you'll want to consider, ...


12

You write in comments that you researched salaries for your position and location, and that what you asked is in line with that. However you speculate that the company you applied to pays premium salaries because they are headquartered in Basel. So far the only thing causing you to think that you might have undersold yourself is the interviewers reaction. ...


11

As mentioned in comments, check your current contract to see whether your notice period already increases with time served. (This would be pretty common in the UK.) If your notice has already increased to something similar to the new proposal, you might as well sign the new contract to take advantage of the matching pay increase. If your current contract ...


8

Every month the company will take $4000, convert it to Indian Rupees at the bank used by the company (using their buy rate for that day) and transfer the result to your account. Purchasing Power Parity is not in any way involved. This is an absolutely normal way for a company to pay a salary to a worker in a country they don't have a big presence in. Be ...


6

So many Red Flags - prepare your plan B. Despite record profits we got no Christmas bonus or CoLA (despite record inflation in my area), let alone legitimate raises. A huge red flag that your company is greedy beyond any sanity. In my experience this is most likely to happen when a take-over is being sought by management (i.e. someone else take's over the ...


6

You may endanger the opportunity by asking for more money - you've already done it once. If you have other offers on the table and this one isn't high on your list, then sure, go ahead and ask for more money. On the other hand, if your personal finances are in a crunch, it might be better to hold off on asking for more right now and see what comes across ...


5

Your own research essentially says that you are not being properly compensated. Why would you agree to more stringent conditions on your termination of employment? You should first ensure you are at least comparably compensated - which appears to be at least 15K more - and given the extra hours you are working you should ask for more yet.


5

Your boss's statement seems stupid and irrelevant to me. Unless he knows what her salary was before she was hired by your company, how can he know what your "household" was making previously? And if there were such a thing as a company paying "household salary", you would be getting a combined check. I've never heard of such a thing, and ...


3

It’s not normal. If you have a hourly salary, any reasonable/decent person will advertise what money they pay you for every hour you work. It is then understood that they subtract taxes or health insurance that they are legally required to pay to the government on your behalf and pay only the difference to you. In addition they would pay these 4% which are ...


3

Since you didn't bother to include your location, I'll assume you're in the US (though the answer applies for most western countries). During probation you can be dismissed for essentially no reason (if you're in an at will state, this applies even after probation). Discrimination is illegal of course but unless someone found out you were part of a protected ...


3

So is it ever appropriate to ask about full-time compensation after receiving an internship offer? If you are thinking of asking "what is your starting salary for converted interns" than the answer is "no". You can (and should) ask about hiring policies for interns up front. Some companies do convert interns, others do not and that can ...


3

As a general rule: Do not sign anything out without a consideration. And this consideration have to be comparable, at least in your opinion, to what you signing off


2

I don't disagree with other answers, esp. the high-ranked ones. But maybe a few more questions that you should answer for yourself, to make it clearer to yourself what your goals and priorities should be: Do you feel your skills and what you have to offer a new employer are sufficiently scarce that such a new employer would be happy to wait 3 months for you ...


2

From the IRS article on tax for persons employed abroad: As a general rule, wages earned by nonresident aliens for services performed outside of the United States for any employer are foreign source income and therefore are not subject to reporting and withholding of U.S. federal income tax. I suspect the 30% comes from an article about backup withholding -...


1

The act of "agreeing upon" is when you sign the contract. Within the contract, it is very clear (hopefully) regarding what the figures mean. Where there is to be a formal written contract, it is generally understood that any preliminary discussions are merely indicative and not binding. Where I am in Australia, it is quite usual to include all ...


1

It's entirely reasonable to want to know whether a company is merely offering some initial commercial experience in exchange for cheap labour, or is running a program to identify it's future junior hires. Something along the lines of following would indicate your interest in a permanent role without being presumptuous about your performance leading to an ...


1

There are places in the world and businesses based on family ties where this MAY be relevant. These are outside of US for sure. Not only your boss is fundamentally wrong to mix your and your wife's employment matters, but it can also be understood as a hint that you are more vulnerable because the company may fire BOTH you and your wife at once. In some ...


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