Hot answers tagged

252

You were not unprofessional at all. Your boss was taking advantage of you, pure and simple. When he lost that he just got nasty and this reflects in his comments. You'll encounter people like this from time to time in your professional life, it is inevitable. Move on and concentrate on your new job. Your boss in only in a salty mood because he's now ...


102

This is normal operating procedure. Your boss is being a jerk. Did he think you were working for fun? You are working to earn a living. When someone offers you a better living or better employment terms, you take it. That's how the working world works. You are under no obligation to ask your current employer for anything. You can if you want while you are ...


51

If you believe you're earning below market rate (or even if you don't, but you're not satisfied with your pay anyway) then apply for jobs and get an offer for what you think you're worth. Then accept that offer, and resign from your current position. Stay professional as you leave - you never know when you'll work with someone again or need a reference. ...


39

Absolutely not unprofessional. If your new salary is three times higher and assuming that the new company isn’t run by total idiots and that new salary is reasonable, the old company has been underpaying you for a long time. I very much doubt they would have tripled your salary (and you will get lots of advice against accepting such a counteroffer even if it ...


20

I think you're overshooting here. It sounds like you're still in college, so I'll answer based on that assumption. I have over thirteen documented vulnerabilities in my resume and six CVE's assigned to my name. This is of course fantastic. It certainly gives you a leg up compared to most other candidates your age. But here's the thing - most companies ...


18

It may be a long time before you see that money, if you even see it at all. Because you are already an employee and doing work, the CEO has little incentive to pay you what was promised, and you are seeing that fact play out right now. Your best opportunity to negotiate was before you joined the company. Promises of bonuses are only as good as the ...


17

Should I ask for an extra raise? Yes, definitely ask. However, if I were you I would not worry about past raises. I would focus on what you are currently worth, and in particular what are you currently worth to the company? There are many sites you can use to get the average going rate for your skill set and experience. Come to the discussions about ...


14

I feel, in addition to disappointment on part of the manager, there was a misconception on his side: He most likely assumed that you were leaving for 'no good reason', i.e. for only a few percent more money. If you had asked him, he would have given you that 10% raise, or even an extra-generous 15%. At least that's what he tells himself now. If you told ...


12

What should I do if he doesn't do what he said that after the 8th month? You should find a new job and move on. At that point it will be clear that he doesn't intend to live up to his promises. That's not someone worth continuing to work for. How should I tell him that I am fed up with his hide & seek game, especially in a culture where direct ...


12

I want to add a more open answer because you did the right thing even if your boss wasn't an asshole nor was exploiting you (which he was and did). There's a lot of people for whom the workplace is a war/competition/jungle and find normal to exploit people until they fight back. For these people, asking for a raise against leaving is normal behaviour. But ...


10

I disagree with the other answer encouraging to ask for extra raise. is it normal that I ask for a "double" raise? No, it is not. Initially, you were supposed to have your employment and salary reviewed and revised after 7th, 14th and 22nd month, and if things work out, indefinite contract thereafter. So, there was a risk (however small that is) of you ...


10

As soon as he doesn't pay because of "financial issues", your number one priority should be to find a different employer with no "financial issues". There is no need for "direct confrontation". You find a new job, sign the contract, then you give the legally required notice. No need to tell them anything at all before you give notice. If you're on the ...


10

I have been in something similar to your situation, though with less provenance, but I hadn't handled it well - dropped my college side job (where I handled 2x the average workload for 1/4 the average pay), which I later came to regret. Now I have, among others, one exceptional 22 year old and a few average ~30 year old developers working for me. The 22 ...


10

It is a good thing you found yourself a new job. Let's consider what would of happened if you asked your current employer for a higher salary before searching for a job. Judging by what was said so far about him, he would tell you he can raise it maybe 2 or 3k per year, or in worse case scenario, realise that you have gained consciousness about your skills ...


9

I think you may be looking at this wrong. It looks like there's no actual legal reason that they have to do this. That's also basically immaterial to your situation. This is HR. HR gets a lot of regulations and requirements from a lot of people. HR's job is to implement those. Some of the requirements are vitally important to the long-term health of ...


8

How is the best professional way to handle this? The professional way to handle this is to not discuss salary with your coworkers. If your coworkers ask what you think you respond with something like: I'm the wrong person to discuss salary with. Management are the ones who make the salary decisions, you should reach out to them if you have any issues. ...


8

Of course this is good news for me but it does put me in a awkward place. Why? Is your pay not confidential? Does everyone know what everyone else makes? Due to the other concern I know this is being brought up with the managers and other senior staff within the business and has disappointed people as they did not get what they wanted. OK, but ...


7

Any advice on what I should do? Given that you have already talked or tried to talk to your manager several times and they have ignored it as much as they can, only thing you can do is work at x for this contract period. Whenever you are due for next contract renewal, do not make the same mistake again. Stand your ground at Y or higher. of course you would ...


7

The equity has to come from somewhere. If the company is public, and there is not an employee equity program already set up, it is unlikely that there is an easy way to give you equity through the company itself. If you really want equity, you could allocate part of your salary to purchase shares yourself. If it is private, it also really depends on the ...


7

Your value to the organisation isn't based on on your colleagues pay, as much as that sucks in a situation like this. If you want a pay rise in your current workplace then you will need to give your manager reasons why you deserve more than you currently make. Your colleague earning more than you is not that reason - it needs to be based on what you deliver....


6

I am aware of the fact that my current salary is quite high, and it could be the maximum salary employers are willing to offer for a similar position. I mentioned that money is not a priority for me at the moment and that I would be happy even with the same salary for a job I really love. The interviewer then asked me if I would be happy with a ...


5

Yes, you should be ok to strike off any visibility of financial information that isn't related to your previous income (if it's legal for your employer to ask). Your new employer only needs to see the amount of salary paid and verify the payer reference. If they need to see anything more than that, then you'd really have to question that request.


5

Doing it shortly after you see it wasn't on your check is perfect. Trying to pre-emptively remind him is overly assertive, but as soon as you see it's not on the next check - ask him. When you ask him - also ask him an estimated time you should see it and/or check in with him again. I'd expect a knowledgeable boss to be able to say: "I've put the request ...


4

Your coworkers have nothing to do with your salary. Don't disclose it, nor disclose by how much it was increased. If they insist, say you're against badmouthing your employer because it can backfire and that they should talk to the manager/RH/director/whatever.


4

Are these 3rd party recruitment firms taking a 'cut' % of recruit's salary, instead of a referral bonus? Most likely - that's a pretty standard model for recruiters providing for perm roles. It actually works for the job seeker since it's then in the recruiter's best interest to get the wage as high as possible. This is one reason why they will sometimes "...


4

If you’re unhappy with your salary, you can certainly negotiate it. However, I don’t think you’re experiencing age discrimination - rather you are being compensated for the skills you do have (technical) and should expect greater compensation as you demonstrate additional skills (behavioral and social). While you do have some technical swagger, you are ...


4

It's definitely worth negotiating your salary again with this new information. Ask for time to discuss your role and salary with your manager. Make it clear before the meeting that the purpose of the discussion includes negotiation of your current compensation. This allows your manager to come prepared with an understanding of what is possible and what isn'...


3

Yes, of course, ask. Keep in mind that you are asking to invest in the company. Company owners generally consider it a compliment when somebody asks to invest (unless the would-be investor is some sort of Wall Street pirate, which you are not). Don't say "can I trade some of my salary for equity?" though. Say, "is there some way I can get shares of your ...


3

You should get a chance to ask these questions at the end of the interview. It's pretty common for the interviewers last question to ask if you have any questions. Ideally you would ask about more than just compensation at this point, e.g. general questions about the position, company etc. Depending on the interview style you may find an opportunity to ...


3

You should probably start looking for a new job with equal/greater pay than what you were promised. To be honest and frank, his argument seems to be BS and he probably just doesn't want to give you the promised raise. There's really no way to tell why, but it seems like you are a motivated individual who can overcome this.


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