Hot answers tagged

220

Both statements have been in courts and both have been ruled illegal and unenforceable. Overtime can be included in the "basic salary", but only if you are in management or similar positions where your basic salary is good enough anyway (currently >76.200€ p.a.). In addition, overtime can not be generally included, because basic contract law says you cannot ...


159

Is this counter-productive for staff moral, retention, and productivity? Yes, it is. People generally get better at their jobs with more experience, and if their productivity increases, they expect to be compensated for it. If it becomes clear that won't happen at this job, they'll start looking for some place where it will. The very best employees, if ...


138

[....] the salary annexure and appointment letter will be issued on your joining. So, basically you're expected to accept an offer and join the work without having any written proof of appointment and confirmed agreement on your payout? Anything which is not a part of written agreement from proper authority, is not part of any agreement, at all. If I ...


133

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


113

FWIW, I knew someone a few years ago that was in a similar situation, and he actually had to take a salary hit when he returned to his old place of work. You're certainly not in a strong position to negotiate a higher salary here: You've made it clear that you want your old job back - you've reached out to them and asked (they're not begging you to come ...


73

Should I just take what I can get? Yes. Your goal here is to get out of a failing company and back to somewhere you enjoy working. Failing to do that isn't worth a little bit of extra cash this year. You're no more valuable now than you were when you left, so you've got no reason why they should pay you more. Big defence contractors tend to have rigid, ...


54

So is this offer letter legally correct or not? It doesn't matter. You should walk away even if it is legal. It's already a big red flag in terms of professionalism to not by default include salary in an offer letter. But to outright refuse when pressed? You're 100% in not-legitimate territory here. There's simply no reason why this would be their policy ...


34

An NDA is a Non-Disclosure Agreement, which legally prohibits you from discussing anything that the company is doing during your employment. You may be required to sign this NDA before any employment contracts are issued. You should not expect to find any Employment Contract details, including any details of your post or Salary, inside the NDA - it's not ...


33

Are employees becoming more valuable to the company over time? For example, do they tend to develop skills that make them more productive or maintain relationships that bring in business? If so, it'd make sense to increase their compensation over time to reflect their increasing value. Otherwise, it'd seem like employees would leave to pursue better-...


28

I think the simple answer is: Always ask for a salary where you would at least seriously consider taking the job if they are willing to give it to you. You can tell them directly that you are happy with your current job and would only consider switching if this comes with a serious salary increase. The information that someone would be willing to hire you ...


27

A job-offer letter is just a contract where you say "I promise to work for you" and the other parties say "in return I promise the following things..." That is all it is. You could have a job offer that says "I promise to come and drink your coffee once a week" and "In return we promise to loudly yell insults" This job offer would be both legal and ...


22

This is business. Your self-worth is not at stake. You are being asked to invest your only irreplaceable resource, your time, in this company. By trading cash salary for shares / ESOP / options / RSUs / whatever, you become an investor in the company. This is fairly common at early-stage companies. Therefore: part of your decision-making process should be ...


21

Hire 14 year-olds and replace them with new 14 year-olds every year. (examples: McDonalds, Girl Scouts) Automate. Tell them they're contractors now, but that they'll make serious cash recruiting others. (examples: Avon, Tupperware, Uber) Outsource the work, or part of the work, to your own customers (examples: Ikea, Waze, Hot Pot City, StackOverflow)


20

The situation in the UK with regard to deductions for mistakes is somewhat complicated. Here is a page that discusses the legalities of it and another page by ACAS. What is certain is three things: They cannot reduce your wages below minimum wages for any reason They cannot deduct more than 10% of your wages for mistakes (though they can deduct 10% ...


18

Simply point out that you cannot consider leaving your existing position until you have the received and reviewed the full details of what they are offering, including any terms or agreements they expect you to sign.


17

In general, when speaking to HR, should it be paid for or done during a paid word day? Since this is a work-related issue, it should be performed "on the clock" and you should be paid. Find an on the clock time that works for both of you. Propose that you speak with them during that time period. Make sure that you are providing enough time to meet their ...


16

Your post is asking a few different questions, so I'll tackle each one separately: How to negotiate an offer if I'm not actually going to accept it? Don't negotiate any offer you're not wanting to accept. Be respectful of people's time and efforts. If an employer really wants you and is willing to go to higher management to negotiate a higher salary or ...


16

unless you're an overachiever or do something really exceptional This is arbitrary. In reality it means the CEO is unwilling to give raises and is telling everyone not to ask him. He's just putting it in a nice way to avoid confrontation and since he's arbitrarily stating what he wants, he could form fit it into anything. "I put in 20 hours of extra work a ...


16

What I found is that the workers are not satisfied with their wages Is this ever not found in a company? Who does not think they should get a raise? So what would be the best way to approach this problem from a human resources perspective? The most logical thing would be to work on issues related to emotional salary, but I would like to hear other ...


15

As someone who has done this successfully in the past, what worked for me was being honest from the get-go, both with the recruiter and with the company, and tell them about my current situation. Something like this is what I would pitch: Thanks for getting in touch with me. The project sounds very interesting, and I would definitely like to learn more ...


14

I think you're approaching this situation all wrong. This is actually an incredible opportunity. Let me explain why. You seem to really like this company - given that you're going out of your way, worrying about how they view you as an employee. But you also don't feel you're getting your fair market pay - that you could earn more elsewhere. So it'd ...


13

Just wanted to add that there's nothing to be embarrassed of. Every step you took made sense w.r.t the information you had at the time you took it. Each time you switch jobs there is a risk that it will be a change for the worse. The real error many people make is sticking to the new job no matter what because they are unable to admit they have made the ...


13

In the future, do not accept an offer until you've seen the written contract (and possibly the employee manual if the contract refers to it in any way). In the meantime, proceed as if you don't have a contract yet, because you don't. Keep on interviewing with other places. Do not stop. Do not slow down. If currently employed, do not quit until you have ...


11

Lying is counterproductive It's reasonable to assume that this is an accurate description of the current situation - that the company fully expects to keep its salary budget per headcount the same (given the inflation adjustment) and the budgets allocated to smaller units and middle management reflect that. So what we're discussing is actually about the ...


11

I'm not sure if what they did is legal. Forget this part, completely as the dispute is over 20$ and your only recourse is to prove that you were not a contractor, but an employee which is not simple, or cheap, and just not worth the hassle. If you feel differently, engage a local lawyer, not random people on the internets. So for sake of this post, I will ...


10

This is clearly an issue with the wages. Minimum wages means CEO is trying to get away with as little wages s/he can give. This is not your problem to handle. Report the feedback from employees to the CEO, without throwing any of them under the bus. Its the CEO's decision to make. It's affecting morale and soon people will start to leave and you will be ...


9

In a lot of countries money loses its value over time due to inflation. For example, Swedish financial politics have a set goal of 2% inflation per year. This means my salary will be worth about 2% less next year unless I get a raise. So should you expect a raise? I would expect a base raise of 2% per year because otherwise I get a pay decrease meaning the ...


8

I would strongly recommend against doing this. I understand why. You're wanting some leverage against your current employer to negotiate a raise. But I'll raise some concerns with your approach. If your skills, experience and work performance are high then those things should be sufficient to negotiate a pay increase. Would your current employer ...


8

Yes. It’s counter-productive. And yes, it’s also a challenge. It just depends on the mentality of the listener. On one end of the spectrum, those who come to work with the mindset of accomplishing the minimum requirement and complain about the smallest thing that comes up will find it upsetting, demoralizing etc... alongside things like the fridge is one ...


8

I felt injustice after my company hired fresh graduates with higher salary and grade than mine You should change your point of view: think this way - Are you getting paid enough for the value addition you provide to the organization? If you think you deserved to be paid more (based on your work and performance), go ahead and ask for it. If the organization ...


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