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2

If you like your current job and your current salary, you should speak with your current manager. Because if your potential new job slips through the cracks and your current boss learns of it and gets offended you didn't let them know, after this whole incident, you may be worse off. It also doesn't hurt to speak with HR to ask what the process should be. ...


0

I'm surprised this hasn't gotten more responses. Putting some possibilities out there to maybe stimulate others with more big-company experience than me to respond. This feels a bit weird to me, do managers in big companies "steal" each other's employees? My feeling is generally no, unless inter-departmental relations are unusually bad. But it is ...


1

I'd do the interview. Any conflict or bruised feelings that might result are things the two managers can sort out amongst themselves (since they still presumably have to work together). I mean, I'd make sure the new prospective manager knew that you were already working for the company, albeit for another manager, but that may not even be an issue, depending ...


1

First of all, the amount of value someone can contribute to a company in a given job is capped at a certain level for most jobs. Even if you are the next Elon Musk you cannot earn the company millions if you are employed as a bookkeeper for a small/midsized company. Therefore having a hard cap on a salary makes perfect sense. Putting a high "up-to-X&...


6

If you don't want to work for less than X it means you can skip this offer. If you find X a good compensation then you know you know you can apply to the offer and expect a proper compensation.


8

Should I ask my manager if he could give me an extra rise because of that undeserved negative evaluation? No. Ask your manager to give you an extra rise because of the value you provide to the company. Ask your manager to give you an extra rise because it will bring you into line with what you are worth on the open market. It would look like I'm asking him ...


0

It's a bit late now to do anything. Disappointed, I went to speak to the new manager. He told me Here's your problem, no paper trail. With anything to do with performance or remuneration, you NEED to get a paper trail started from the beginning. Then you at least have something to work with. Do NOT trust or expect anyone else to help you. Sometimes they ...


3

In contract work your compensation is one of the terms and can only be (re)negotiated when your contract is (re)negotiated. should I expect a salary increase No, you should not expect it; you can try to negotiate an increase when and if the contract renewal is offered to you. Under the contract you are a vendor of services to the other party. Why would ...


1

I would expect it when a new contract is being drawn up, if at all. And maybe it wouldn't even be when the first six month contract expires but maybe it'd be when the second six month contract expires (since that'd be a year later). Ultimately, I think it'd probably depend on the reason why you were on a fixed month contract anyway. Like if your company was ...


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So... the obvious thing to say from an outside perspective is that this person is exploiting you (they are), they're not likely to be willing to stop easily (they're not) and that the best way to respond is a clean break followed by getting other work. Based on what you've said, though, that's not a viable path for you. You need work, and if you give up on ...


1

for example we agree to work on a project with a specific payment and while working on this project I am asked to finish tasks on other projects that we didn’t agree on You messed up. Contract work isn't like salary work. You get paid to deliver the contract, you don't get paid to do helpful things. Failure to deliver the contract is directly tied to a ...


0

My salary is paid with a 1 month lag, ie the pay in February is based on the sickness, overtime, holiday & any absences for January. This means that when I leave the last payment brings it all up to date. This allows payroll or accounting to have all the relevant info to be collated and reduces the number of corrections - but there are always a few which ...


9

I went through this back in the 1990's. We were paid every two weeks, but payday was on the last day of the pay period, the very same day you submitted your (paper) time card. It was great for the employee because there was no lag. From the company standpoint it was a pain. They would have to adjust their accounting because they wouldn't know how much ...


4

This is standard practice in, e.g. Russia. If you work the entire month without paid or unpaid leave, you get your monthly fixed salary. However, if you, e.g. take paid time off, you do not get the salary for the missed working days, but you get — for lack of a more accurate term — "vacation money". Since the latter is a fixed rate averaged over ...


13

You need to write this job off to experience and find other work. You have done it all wrong in terms of freelancing from the beginning. You cannot change it now without repercussions. This is why it's best to operate on an hourly basis. Then if she needs you all day during working hours to do nothing she pays. If you get a 12 hour task you charge for 12 ...


6

I understand the dilemma that you can't afford to quit because jobs are hard to find, but can you afford to continue working for this person if you're being taken advantage of and you aren't getting paid? How would quitting add any additional hardship? You're not being paid now. If it were me, I'd cease doing any and all work immediately and start looking ...


0

Say ... why not just take these concerns to your present manager? "Tell them exactly what you think," just as you have done here, "then ... listen carefully." First, speak. Then, [shaddup and ...] let them speak. And please remember – neither of you are actually "adversaries."


5

You're putting in the work, not being told to do unpaid overtime or anything else. Which is good, it shows commitment and a good work ethic. But it's not grounds for trying to get a new contract sorted. You're an intern, this is the sort of thing you do if you want to impress. Are you being taken advantage of? Yes & NO. You're taking advantage of ...


6

It's unusual, but ordinarily has no effect: your monthly salary is fixed at 10000, and you get that regular amount each month, and pay the same amount of deductions (tax, insurance, pension...) each month. It may well have a bearing on overtime payments. Four hours' overtime in January would be 0.5 × 476 on your calculation in the question. In February 2021, ...


4

One unintended consequence: sometimes you need to submit paycheck stubs as proof of income. Like some apartments may require you make 2-3 times the rent on an apartment. So if you get paid weekly then, using that calculation method, February would result in higher income than in January. So, if you're close in income to the 2-3x limit, already, then maybe ...


0

Should I just let it go as it's a very obvious clerical error or should I ask they pay me what amounts to about a months salary? Can you list what country you're in? In the USA, and possibly other 1st world countries, there are numerous case laws in regard to incorrect pay due to paperwork error. The general ruling is, unless your boss initially made a ...


16

My question is how to best proceed from here? Send an email pointing out the mistake, and get it corrected. This is not high school, where we can try finding loopholes (to exploit). Wear your professional hat, accept what is intended.


0

Every position, in the US at least, has a "salary range" approved by HR and the Legal team, which the hiring manager must live with. The manager merely wants to know if you'd be satisfied with that, and if (s)he's truly interested in you will eventually just ask.


1

If I am asked the salary expectation question again in a subsequent interview, what do I comment after stating the numbers? In most cases, the initial salary question is done as an "order of magnitude" sanity check. If they have a 50k budget and you are a 100k candidate, there is no point in proceeding. A range is also fine and appropriate here ...


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