New answers tagged

2

Those interviews are time-demanding and tiresome and I don't want to go through those again only to find out in the end they can't afford me. At the same time, I don't want them to think the only thing that matters for me is the money. State your minimum salary right off the gate. Something along the lines "The opportunity looks great, just FYI the ...


2

I have contributed in different ways [...] Depending on what your contributions consist on, those could be valid reasons to ask for a raise if they added significant value or income to the company. [...] and gained both hands-on experience and knowledge related to tools/processes mostly related to this company I would say that gaining experience and ...


-1

Let me phrase this in a way that might make you a bit happier: They've effectively paid you a six figure salary. Your company is valued at 5 million right now. You've got 5% shares. That's $250,000. Combine it with the $42k of regular salary, and you've averaged $125k/year! The reason your salary (and their salary) is so low is because they're trying to ...


0

I don't know how to properly balance the equity vs salary equation, but I feel that their high number of shares in the company should argue for a lower salary on their part, and my low number of shares should argue for a higher salary. What do you want to happen? What will make you happy? Assume you are negotiating for salary bump, or more stocks for ...


1

Founders get more shares. That’s the way it works. It’s their company. 5% is a very good equity share for a non-founder. This has nothing to do with anyone’s salary. Eventually they are going to be CEO or whatnot and get paid way way more than you. Their salary has nothing to do with yours. (Heck, they were paying you more than they were taking for a ...


-7

I've had the exact same salary since I started, $3500/mo ... $3500k/mo The founders are making more than 3 millions a month, while you're making 1000 times less despite doing the development works. which has made us good friends Good "friends" don't pay themself 1000 times better than you while holding more equity. They are not your friends, they are ...


0

Under American law, companies are strictly limited in how they are permitted to do most things with regards to employee compensation. This has the practical effect of "homogenizing" everything. So, if you want to get a step-up in position and salary, usually the best way to do that is to change jobs. Now, you are competing with other people for a new ...


4

Would it be reasonable to ask for a pay increase? Very reasonable. It's fairly common to pay more for evening or overnight shifts when a job would typically be daytime. Another thing is I would appreciate to get paid more frequently. Would it be fair to request this or is this too unrelated? It's fair to ask anything. It's unlikely they will change ...


2

The simple truth is that salaries are about negotiating ability/power more than actual value. The company's negotiating position is much stronger with current employees than with a prospective new employee. Simple as that.


0

I work in company A through recruitment agency B. I want to ask for a wage raise. Who do I need to ask it? You ask your manager at agency B for a raise. They pay your wages. They are the only ones in a position to change your salary.


0

You have an arrangement with company B. Company B has a contract with company A. Depending on how the management and budgeting in Company A is done the person who manages your time has no idea how much company A is paying per hour to have you work on their project. They definitely have no idea how much an hour you see in your check after benefits, taxes, ...


4

should I just say I'm happy with the lower end of his range? Two factors making me what to go lower than his range is that they may find someone cheaper who will disclose their range and Also I'm somewhat under qualified for this position (3 years instead of 5 they asked), or is this foolish? Companies don't seek the cheapest candidate they can ...


1

You already gained a lot (potentially) by not telling what you thought was an Ok salary, but being told that the company is considering a much higher salary range. Coming with low salary expectations doesn't do you any good. Your salary is not the major selling point, what you can do is. Low salary expectations say "I myself believe that I'm not very good ...


21

So, the job is really a perfect fit for me. But the low salary really started to nag on me. How can I get a higher salary without loosing the job opportunity? If the salary isn't what you need/want, then the job isn't a perfect fit. Wait until the end of your current contract. Then, if an extension is offered, indicate the salary you require in order ...


3

You talk to the people who pay you. Which will probably be company B - they'll invoice company A for you, but your contract is with B, even if you turn up at company A each day to work. It's written in your contract.


8

Say "Thank you for this information." Why do you feel you need to make a preemptive declaration of what you're willing to accept? Wait until you're interviewed and offered the position (if that happens). Don't appear to be desperate or willing to accept whatever they offer, unless you actually are desperate and willing to accept whatever they offer. They ...


0

No, do the conversion yourself first. If you leave it to the employer to do the conversion for you, it's one more opportunity for them to mislead you. It would be like going to a car dealership and allowing them to do all the payment calculations for you. Also, note that you may end up working way more than 40 hours a week without any overtime pay (...


1

Not necessarily. Stating your contract rate is equivalent to stating your previous salary. Converting between the two is relatively easy if you know the extra benefits that come with being an employee. You can check the many many other questions on this site about when to state your previous salary, but in general stating it puts you at a disadvantage. ...


1

I have a firm hourly rate already established when I do contract work. Is it advisable to respond with my rate just to establish a range we can negotiate around? Yes, and expect to be countered with a substantially lower number, and do not rush to dismiss it as while employee salaries are lower, they include bonuses like paid time off, which may ...


4

Those questions are perfectly fine. Personally, I would not have expected their answers and I would probably have asked again just to make sure I did not misunderstand their answer and then I might have left the interview early. But that's not on you. The questions are very reasonable and the fact that I think their answers are ridiculous just shows that ...


10

Are those three questions no-no to ask during the interview? You can and should ask any question whose answer is important to you. That's the only way you'll know if this is a job you actually want. Hopefully, these weren't the only questions you asked. Hiring managers like to see candidates who are interested in the work and the company, and not solely ...


3

Send an email back to HR/whoever sent it along these lines: Excuse me, but why are you asking for this information? If there is specific data you need then let me know and I can provide it. Otherwise, I have a policy of not disclosing private details about my employment". Don't create an excuse (eg privacy) which they can try to counter or argue. ...


6

That information is not needed. It's not illegal to ask for it, but there is no legal reason to do so either. I have never had anybody outside government authorities and banks that give loans ask for a payslip in Germany. What they do need is your social security number, your health insurance number and your tax id. That is a legal requirement because they ...


1

Check your offer or contract from your new employer: are there any terms in there that require you to disclose this information? Check your offer, contract and specifically any non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements from your previous employer: are there any terms in there that prevent you from disclosing this information. Check your local laws: Does ...


1

I know it's common for people to try to keep such information private. Why is this? Is it just considered polite or is it strategic for career advancement? This attitude has been established for the convenience of employers. It makes management easier, and improves their bargaining position when negotiating salaries: management knows what they're paying ...


1

I guess since all other answers were downvoted, people are missing a relation to the question. I know it's common for people to try to keep such information private. Where I work, working hours and position are not a secret as far as I know discussions about work. Payment indeed is. Let's look at examples, that can be extended according to personal ...


2

The case worker needs to close the case, even if they weren't the ones responsible for you landing the job, so they have a form to fill out that asks for these details. These are run through various statistics internally, to find out what measures were successful in bringing people towards employment, with the goal of ending measures that cause people to ...


5

If it is high, people get jealous. I am a software developer and one who recently graduated from university. I don't think it is a surprise that software developers get paid relatively well. Queue the pile of fellow grads in other fields who think that people like myself are overpaid for our experience level while they earn far less as baristas or entry-...


-2

Why would the government want (aka need) to know this? I never agreed to this and don't want to help my case manager look like he did work that he didn't. Because you're asking for something from the government not other way around. When you want someone to do a favour for you, you are expected to give out something in return. If you don't like it, just ...


-1

Is it just considered polite or is it strategic for career advancement? Plenty of solid reasons, the most general is this is the information age, info is valuable and shouldn't be given away for nothing. But pay and things like that are between you and an employer. In terms of job searching it weakens your negotiating stance for people to know your ...


2

Is it legal.. That depends entirely on where you live and work. Google is your friend here. ... and/or ethical. As long as they are only revealing "piecework" totals - and not base salary - then I'd say it's perfectly ethical. It's completely transparent - it takes something that is a definite and quantifiable measure of productivity and is using it to ...


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