New answers tagged

4

I feel your pain. You mention you really like your job, and that you work for a non-profit. I work in a field that helps the deaf and hard-of-hearing. Long ago I made the decision that I would forego a large income in order to use my talents to help those in need. I have made a fair wage, but I know I earn about 40% less than those with my skills who work ...


2

But are my expectations unrealistic that my salary should not be capped? Unfortunately, virtually all decent sized companies have formal salary ranges with caps. It's unrealistic in your context to expect that your particular salary would be completely uncapped. That I should receive the full benefit of yearly salary increases? If I'm the excellent ...


8

How to re-negotiate? You don't... It would reflect poorly on you. NEVER let the so called "market value" or "average salary" affect your satisfaction. You have a job paying 4.1k and now you will start a job paying 5.5k with the chance of getting more every 6 months. That is almost 35% MORE than you get today. This is great: feel great ...


-1

Beware of Legal Complications In some countries, your company could be required by the local legal framework to give that expected raise after the employee's been given the "empty" promotion. It's not unusual in some places, where: the laws clearly state that if a worker has been given new responsibilities and challenges, as well as a new title, ...


1

Self-employed and online you're competing against a bunch of people willing to work cheaply whether because they lack experience, or they're desperate, or because they live somewhere where they can afford to. You can make a lot of money in any profession self-employed, but to do so you need a network willing to pay what you ask. You don't find those out of ...


2

Having spent time with computers as a kid isn't the only criterion to become a successful software developer. There is the obvious "hard" skills like programming, modelling and knowledge about software architecture, but as important are soft skills. Non-technical skills and traits include: Business awareness of the domain they are in Project- and ...


3

Personally, I know of two ways to make money as a software developer. Obviously, there might be more, but I'm not familiar with them. Sell a product This is how I make money. I have a few line-of-business products that help my customers run their business. It helps them save money, so they are willing to pay money for (a) purchasing a license and (b) ...


2

Connections , Connections, Connections use your strengths and staff your weaknesses Business is not just HAVING a product, its more to be able to SELL the product Find salesperson with connections and open up partnership You will do the work, and he / she will sell it


0

Is it ethical/ok to revise my estimate given the above reason, or will it create issues? You can always revise your salary expectation, for any reason. It may cause "issues". You may not care. Remember though, the fact that you believe you will be getting a promotion at your current workplace does not make you worth any more to this potential ...


1

I don't necessarily think it is unethical, but I do not completely understand your reasoning. When you were asked for your expectation, you had a certain estimate of how 'valuable' you are: what you would want to earn and/or what you think you deserve to earn. Your skills didn't improve suddenly because of the promotion, so the promotion does not affect what ...


5

Is it ethical/ok to revise my estimate given the above reason, or will it create issues? I am very sure this is not unethical, but that doesn't mean it's completely harmless to you and your interests... Be aware you may get a no for an answer, in case they are not willing to accept the new estimate. In other words, disclosing this new reason should imply ...


0

I think you're reading too much into this. Company A offers $xxx. You tell company B how much company A is offering. Regardless of the ethics of you sharing that information, one of the following will happen; Company B will decide that they can offer $xxx + $x. You take the higher offer. Company B will decide that they cannot match company A's offer. They ...


0

Depends on country and state. EU, I am sure this would run afoul of GDPR. US, California has strong laws requiring this information remain confidential.


0

They won't; they already know you were probably inflating the number a bit to help the negotiation along.


3

Put simply, your understanding of the complexity of a modern optimising compiler toolchain is off by at least two orders of magnitude. I also have a hunch that, to take one example, there are only two or three people keeping the C# language standard up to date and maintaining the compilers Absolutely not. I have no inside information, but the C#/.NET ...


1

Manager would say anything to keep you at your place. By the time year end rolls in and your raise is nothing, would be too late to switch. Best raises I got in my carrier were due to job switch and not internal remunerations


7

Generally speaking, is it worth it to stay in a great team and culture with only the dangling of long term growth keeping you there? What has history shown you? You've not been promoted in 2.5 years. You're underpaid in comparison to your peers. New employees are being hired at levels above you. Does that support the statements your manager made about the ...


5

They can ask anything they like. The probability is that they won't. Unless it's on a personal level there is no reason CompanyB would give out this information. But on a personal network level anything can happen. I went to an interview once and before my interview had even started my current employer had been informed I was in the waiting room by a staff ...


2

This is, of course, a very personal question. Leaving a job is scary, especially the first few times you do it. But I think that most people in tech would agree that they have to move jobs regularly to maximize their compensation (since major upward bumps only happen upon entry to a new position). You have a track record of promises not being kept at the ...


3

They certainly can. They won’t though, because company A will tell them “none of your business.”


2

First off, pay is never strictly about years, primarily it’s about position with time in grade being a secondary consideration. If this is a government and/or a union job, your manager may be correct in that there are hard experience requirements for some positions that simply can’t be overridden by competence. If it’s neither, then it’s likely that your ...


3

In Canada, if the employer has pay grades, it is normal that salary is based on experience to a certain extent. Also, the two major employers (a hospital and the military) for which I worked had an establishment of how many people they could have in each pay grade. Something else my two employers had in common was a salary range within each pay grade. In ...


-1

If you haven't started writing your own compilers on the side, then you are very not likely to get such a job. What you will find out is that writing compilers is not just about the compiler, but also the run time environment. Secondly, writing compilers is also heavy into testing. Modern compilers have to pass a very serious test suite to get released. ...


-2

One thing that I don't see mentioned but it is important: after a while experience does not really matter for compensation, if anything I have seem experienced people adopt dont-get-fired-minimum-work plan where they don't care about learning new stuff or keeping up with developments. So beside the fact that your management is probably lying even if they are ...


22

Is it "normal" to pay you only enough to keep you from leaving? Yup! Even though that's not your question, that's what "normal" is, in my experience, in the US. I worked at one place, where, after a year in one department, I'd transferred to a new area. At my first review in that new area, my boss said, "this is all we're paying you? ...


35

When it comes to wages, employees and management simply have opposing views. You as an employee view this as an individual problem, while management view wages collectively. From their view, giving you a raise could start an avalanche where others also demand more compensation - which they obviously want to avoid. One way to manage this is by sweet talking ...


129

If you want to get paid what you're worth you're probably going to have to change jobs. There's a 99% chance that management is lying when they say "they can't figure out how to do it"; with a 1% chance of general incompetence instead. Either way you're not getting it from your current employer. Very large raises, and the equivalent to 7-12 years ...


10

Am I at risk of termination for not doing it? If you refuse to do what you are asked to do, then certainly you put yourself at risk of being terminated. That said, suggest alternative ways of dealing with this issue (speed the process up, have someone else cancel it, automation, etc.) and see if they still insist that you do it. Only your manager can know ...


1

It's perfectly fine not to ask about compensation for the first interview provided you filled up your turn with other questions. It is a good idea to ask location and salary right away because these influence what transpires in your next round, and saves a little time. You have nothing to lose, and something to gain.


1

How to preemptively tell employer what you expect to get paid when there's potential for confusion/miscalculations There should be no potential for confusion or miscalculation. Your payrate, overtime, and bonus should all already be written into your contract/employment agreement. If you are required to report your hours worked to your manager then you ...


0

First off, I wouldn't call the overtime rate a "bonus", as bonus implies its discretionary. Personally, I would simply wait for the paycheque to arrive. If they get it wrong, that's just something they'll have to spend time fixing. If you were inclined to email them before the paycheque, there is no real way to do this without implying you don't ...


4

Assuming that the company trusts you to be honest: They can't just hand out £15 but need some invoice for tax reason. If you give them a piece of paper that you paid £15 in phone charges, that's enough for the company for tax purposes. On the other hand, when you do your own taxes, and you have no proof of the expense, the £15 will be seen as profit and you ...


6

It is absolutely normal, and very much above board. You maintain a paper trail, and everyone is happy.


0

It sounds like interesting work in a small startup where you have autonomy. I have been in this situation. You could explain that you enjoy the work and would like to grow with the company, but you are missing out on opportunities that pay alot more. You could tell them that in two months time you would like to double your wage/ hourly rate, or halve your ...


2

I recommend that you devote half your time to finding new clients and developing a relationship with them. If this results in producing fewer, poorer, or later results for your current client, then too bad for him. If he can pay late, then you can work late. He'll tolerate such poor performance from you because you are a good sucker. Once you have multiple ...


-1

You are supposed to be a good developer, not a good negotiator. Take full advantage of this fact. Go to your manager. Tell him straight away that you were awfully bad at negotiating a salary, that you are not getting a fair salary, and that you see no reason to stay when you are absolutely underpaid. And that if he wants you to stay, you expect a different, ...


0

One of two things is true: Either you are not happy with the amount he is paying you, or you are happy with the amount he is paying you. The latter case is easier than the former case so I'll start there: He shouldn't be doing that, he agreed to a price etc, and that's what he should pay. this is dishonest and etc etc, let's get that straight. However, if ...


10

There are a number of different ways companies handle this so talk to your Manager to find out the policy in your company. The most common are:- A daily allowance (per diem) to cover your stay. Reimbursement of allowed expenses on production of receipts. Provision of Company Credit card for charging expenses to 1 and 2 usually involve you paying out first, ...


14

You can simply ask what is and where you can find the company policy on business trips. In this way you will probably be addressed to the document explaining the entire policy and you will get more information than the single question you have now. This will save you from keep asking questions over time, as it is normal to have them coming later.


0

In my view its highly likely you will be put down. This is mainly because your manager has to justify the raise with the management. Which will keep him in un-comfortable position. So mostlikely he will avoid. The best way is to show your work with high quality and then get into discussion with your manager like --"by the way I see that I am underpaid. ...


20

There is nothing beneficial for you in this relationship. Extricate yourself from it and stop performing work for him. If he fails to pay you then you'll probably need to take it as a loss. Why you would put up with this for so long is a bit of a mystery. If you say it's because you need the money then I would counter that you aren't actually getting any ...


6

Is it a good option to be honest in a meeting with my boss and just say "I feel underpaid"? No, don't say that. You need to be more strategic about this. Edit your resume and start putting some feelers out there. That is the first step. It doesn't matter if you don't want to move on. Doing this kind of research will inform your bargaining position....


-2

As others already stated you might need to leave for a huge increase. One can expect about 30% more when switching jobs (after about 5 years of staying at a company). But there is another way if you want to stay: You could negotiate that they pay the salary that you want in the future, if a 60% increase is not possible immedately. Get a contract that ...


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