New answers tagged

1

Normally employees with significant equity are given revolving golden handcuffs- you get an RSU (or options) package when you sign up, and then around the 1 year anniversary you get a new (smaller) one on top. Then again on the 2 year. Etc. Thus you always have new shares coming due. If this isn't in place on you, either they figured the increase in ...


1

If you're not planning on taking it, then don't mention it to your current company. However, if you think your current boss will be receptive and won't hold it against you and you're prepared to take the risk, you could do the following: Turn down the other company. Go to your boss and say "Hey, I like it here and I want to stay. I had an unsolicited ...


2

The bottom line, in software, you make money in one of two ways. Jumping across the street for an acceptable raise Stock options that go public You mention B is a startup, did you get options? You should be clear on when you get your initial and subsequent grants. Stay as long as the economic outlook is good. If you are not getting options you have no ...


7

To put a different spin on the answer, I think the real question here is whether you should go back to company A. The thing is, when company A had problems, you were one of the people they cut, and you had to find a new job. Company B was the company who took you in when you needed a place to work to pay your bills; company A was the one who caused that ...


0

It's sounds like you want to get a written offer from Company A. Accept that offer if you would like to rejoin them. Then hand in whatever notice is required to Company B in writing so this means an official letter signed by you. Be professional and polite to all involved if you want to find a resignation template I would search for a free one online there ...


10

Unless you have decided to quit company B and join company A, don't mention anything to your boss. Mentioning this to your boss will likely do more harm than good. Since you started with company B during the pandemic, you have not even been with the company for 6 months. Unless you have incredibly exceeded their initial expectations of you, your boss is ...


3

I am contemplating asking for a raise to 250k, which is very substantial (+56%). Based on the factors I enumerate below, does this appear justified? However you see it, a 56% raise is a big number (not impossible, though). Even more considering your previous raise was of 33%. Given that you are about to finish the venture raising, and that you have gained ...


4

For literally decades now, the running joke in IT, at least, has been that if you want a raise, you should find another job. Twice, I have seen people go through this. My present employer pulled this on a former coworker. They refused to meet his requirements, then when he quit, they ended up advertising his role, with fewer duties, for more money than he ...


1

If they are advertising the same job 30% higher but not forthcoming with a rise then you should think about moving on. Unfortunately many companies take advantage of inertia - you like the culture there, it's comfortable so you put up with being paid 2/3rds of your worth. 2 years experience counts for a lot on the job market. Your boss has shown he is more ...


2

I explained that since my start I have not received a raise ever since I started working here 2 half years ago, and his reply was that my first 6 months of employment cannot be counted, since it's probationary period of employment.(that really doesn't make sense since I was working during this time). So he said it's only been two years not two and half I ...


4

It's not uncommon for an employer to find an excuse to get an extra 3-6 months of work out of you before giving you a promotion you already earned. Plus however long it took you to decide to ask. Some would say that you should never worry about how much other employees make. I disagree. There will be differences in pay due to the negotiating skills of the ...


1

What I'm concerned about is that these two responsibilities have very different skillset needed and require different level of compensation. Then you should proceed to ask and obtain a more specific answer of what these tow responsibilities will consist of, so they are crystal clear. Only then you can have a clear picture of what they will involve and be ...


8

This company I am working for also has my same position at 30% more in salary then me as well as a starting base I seen on the postings, as they continue to hire new people and keep expanding the team. I am becoming annoyed and starting to feel as I am being lied to about every getting a raise, along with the fact I am not being paid correctly as well. Just ...


-2

This is already answered by the principle "The customer is always right". The client asked me to send in an invoice for the work I've done so far Because, the client intends to pay you for the fraction of work done so far. Now, let's review another principle: "Shut up after the sale". The customer's personal situation is their business,...


5

You have a real decision here because multiple approaches are correct both legally, morally and business-wise. Short-term paid work beats unpaid work and work paid now beats work paid later. So if you yourself need money and now, obligations to yourself and your family trump moral obligations to strangers. Long-term, happy customers are return customers, and ...


1

Quote the customer for the extra work with a due date of six months. Submit the current invoice, making it clear that on payment (and on receipt of the extra order) you'll upload the extra work to the server. Giving the customer a year's grace is excessive IMO, since if he's not got his arse in gear after nine months or so he'll be so badly behind with his ...


7

You are looking to balance business sense with charity in a way that makes sense to you. One of the biggest questions is whether their business or whatnot is still going to be in existence moving forward - if not, then free Web site work is wasted time on their part as well, as they won't be using it! Make sure and understand what's going on with them ...


2

Years ago I worked for a really good boss. I decided to leave the company anyway but I promised him I'd finish some work he really needed. When I realized the work would not be finished before my final day I decided I'd continue to go to work anyway until completion. That company used what I worked on for several years after I left. I wanted to do it because ...


1

This seems quite straightforward. The budget for the project has been cut. The reason does not matter. The manager has asked you to cease additional work on the project and send an invoice for work already completed. There is no need to do anything else. If it is "almost done", someone else can finish it later.


4

A difficult situation. So some compromise is called for. Here's what I would do (I am assuming that 80% of the work has already been done): (i) Invoice your client for 60% of the agreed price. (ii) Let them know that you will finish the project at a discount, for an additional payment of 20% of the agreed price. So you are taking a 20% hit, but your client ...


1

Do you expect to get any future work from this client? If so, finish the project and cut them some slack in payment. If not, remember that if the client's beloved granny has just died, you don't know if this is the first or the twenty-first time they have told that story as an excuse! If they are offering part payment for the work already done, take it and ...


168

However, I also can't justify working for free You don't have to justify anything to anyone but yourself. One angle the other answers haven't touched on is goodwill and client relations. When you go out of your way to do someone a good turn when they're hurting it's never forgotten. You may not believe in karma (I don't really). But reputation as a ...


42

There's an old joke that may make the point. A man is home when he hears a knock on the door. When he opens it, the person at the door starts to tell them about a poor family in town, the husband lost his job, the kids are sick, they're behind in their bills and can't pay their rent. He asks them if they could donate to help this poor family. The man is ...


11

If you feel generous because of the client's misfortune, you submit your invoice and give them extra time to pay. If there's extra work that they plan to pay you for in the future, they're effectively asking you for a loan. Consider the actual cost to you of doing the work (maybe you have a slack period coming up) and the likelihood of them ever paying. A ...


25

What is my best course of action here? There's no "best" here. If you are a freelancer, you can choose to do whatever you like, within the bounds of your contracts. If it were me, I'd send an invoice for my work so far and promise to come back and finish when the client's situation changes. It's business, not charity. That said, you can always ...


3

Payment by check is unusual and often a sign of fraud. The way the fraud works is that you receive a check for more money than you are owed, and you are asked to send the difference back. The check is likely stolen or forged, so 6 weeks or 6 months later your bank figures it out, takes the money out of your account, you lose the money that you sent back, and ...


13

Client wants to make an upfront payment, is it bad to ask for payment on completion? Even if this client is legit (which I highly doubt it is), you will not be able to get paid for your work. You stated that you can only receive payments by credit card transfer. The client has stated that they cannot pay with credit card transfer. By your own policy, you ...


0

"Well, have you yet engineered a 'tangible downside?'" Any alternative scenario which could cause him or her ... "business pain?"


2

I feel the CEO is just wasting time and trying to go around the issue at hand even though he agrees that my performance exceeds expectations and that I am due for a raise. He is. How can I respond to this and tell him look thats all fine and dandy and maybe at a future time that can be put together but for now I'd like a salary increase. Be direct, much ...


13

As I understand you still in the middle of negotiation as nothing has been finalized. Why don't you suggest to your boss to break a raise in to two parts Immediate permanent raise in your regular salary for job well done and all the efforts you've put in. % of each future project company will be working on If you cannot get any current increase, in my ...


8

How can I respond to this and tell him look thats all fine and dandy and maybe at a future time that can be put together but for now I'd like a salary increase. You already asked for a salary increase and even though he seemingly agreed that you are doing good work he did not give you the salary increase. This means that either he: Doesn't really value ...


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