New answers tagged

0

Based on your edits it sounds like HR requested photos of the card in your best interest. One They have had too many people typo their banking information so direct deposit was messed up or delayed. If they get a picture with numbers then the blame would be 100% on them if something goes amiss. Two HR departments deal with direct deposit fraud. It is ...


1

You have to decide if you are willing to risk it. Will they get the funding? Will they keep their promise? You have to decide how long you will wait for the deals to be completed, and for them to increase your pay. If you don't like the situation, then negotiate. But realize that you may not get what you want, or they may even decide to move on to the ...


3

I have seen similar silly request several times. The real reason is the employer assumes you are not able to 'spell' your IBAN and BIC without making an error, so your salary would go into the wrong account, and the you'd whine and complain, and they have to run after it. In the US, employers and banks typically insist to get a voided check, for the same ...


12

Yes, they would have to pay you in almost all developed countries in the world. You've essentially left (very early) during your probationary period, so the company would have to pay you in full for all the days you have worked thus far, and then terminate your employment contract.


2

Do I need to be concerned that my manager somehow knew I was looking to leave? The timing is way too on-the-mark with my job search, as I only seriously started looking a couple of weeks ago. Why would you be concerned about whether or not they know you've been looking around? If you feel that their knowing puts you in a position of power then let them ...


12

Do I need to be concerned that my manager somehow knew I was looking to leave? No you need not. At this point it's not relevant if they somehow found out about that, as you already got the raise. It could have been, perhaps, that they felt you a bit demotivated and that inspired them to give you a raise. If they really value me so much, WHY would a ...


4

It sounds to me like your manager values your work, recognises you were underpaid (as he's already spoken to you about an upcoming pay rise), and realised that you are not happy with it (otherwise he wouldn't have spoken to you about a planned pay rise that's months away, and he'll certainly recognise the effect on your morale of the bonus being turned down)....


1

3 EASY SOLUTIONS IF it's a job that one CANNOT afford to loose, and (as the OP stated), they insist with the so called "regulations", forcing you to give up those card photos (which i ABSOLUTELY DON'T RECOMMEND, because it's INSANE no matter how you look at it), you could do the following: Simply tell them that you do NOT own a credit card. You have a bank ...


0

It's a little strange to offer a range, unless he's also offering a tradeoff between stock options / RSUs and money. If he is offering you a tradeoff, please ask another question with more details if you want our help. If it's not a tradeoff: Mentioning a range is probably your would-be boss's clumsy way of starting a salary negotiation. At this point in ...


20

The request from the bank is NOT scam. Seems like the OP is talking about a so called "Debit-Bankomatkarte" which indeed have a CVV. But I still think that the employer in question did not mean that card. It is more likely that the the employer isn't aware that OP already got this new card (because those cards are kinda new in Austria). [please note I'm ...


0

do managers state the range of the salary they will offer Yes it did happen with me as in a big MNC. Your actual salary is decided by HR. Your manager may just have got approval to hire you and he must be aware that at this position, salary varies in this range. Once you say yes (verbally), they may request HR to roll-out a formal offer letter with final ...


9

This does not sound like an offer. It sounds like you were invited to partake in candidate assessment for a regular role. They are saying: "Now your internship is over, would you like to apply to transition across?". Internships do not always flow into regular employment, and not every intern will be invited. An actual offer will contain an exact figure ...


1

The proper time to negotiate a raise is either before you sign a contract or after you've been working for a significant amount of time. (What qualifies as significant depends on a number of different factors including the role you're in and the nature of your contract but that's a separate topic.) The point is, you've agreed to a set of terms and to people ...


1

As others have pointed out, this does sound very suspicious. I certainly wouldn't do this, however what I could consider is sending them scans of front and back of the card with the card number on the front and CVV and signature on the back blacked out. This way they'll only get your name and account details (account number, branch/sort code, and name). I ...


4

"Work" and "school" play by different rules. At work, you get paid for what you do. Getting another piece of paper isn't likely to make any difference to that (since you had already learned the material to pass your exam before you were interviewed). It's possible that in a bureaucratic company, getting some paper qualification automatically puts you into ...


0

Indeed there is a risk in asking for a raise, as it may come across as you being unhappy about the salary you get. You will be seen to be less loyal to the company, which will count against you when they will have to decide whether to keep you or not at the end of the trial period. This will be especially likely if you cannot explain why do you expect a ...


0

Depends on country. I would imagine in any country though they have to prove that you have it or at least responsible for it. Either you signed off on a custody form or if you acknowledge you received it somehow. When I receive equipment from my employer, they made me sign a document saying I received one laptop and a keyboard. At the end of my employment, I ...


45

NOPE! BIG RED FLAG! The information on both sides of your card is enough to put some nasty charges on your account. People interviewing at the bank should absolutely know better. The person who asked this of you (it might not be the interviewer) could well be a rogue employee. Either that or they are gauging how susceptible to social engineering you might ...


19

IMHO, sounds like a scammer phishing for personal information. No employer needs your card for payroll setup. Bank information provided on the first day of employment when filling up the forms does that. DO NOT SEND them these pictures and no more personal information. Instead, start researching the party you are in communication with.


3

The following applies to anything that has a price: Changing a price before the other side reacts is poor negotiation, but can be written off as a mistake. Changing a price after the other side agrees is an insult.


-3

Something sounds amiss. You should inquire further. Could only one side of the card be sent? Why are both sides needed? How can I be sure that my information will be kept safe? If it turns out that you really must send a photo of both sides of your bankcard, then using encryption is an option. If you are familiar with GPG encryption, you could ask for ...


-1

I'm honestly not sure how realistic the idea of them rescinding the offer is. I would think that the worst case is that they simply say they won't meet the new demand. It depends on how urgently you need this job and if other offers are on the table. If you have some time, you could try getting an offer from another company for more and letting the first ...


266

DO NOT DO THIS You are interviewing at a bank. They SHOULD know better than to ask you for this information. It is possible that they believe your "bank account card" is just a simple "EC card" which may not contain any security features. They may not be aware that there are some banks that use a single card for transactions as well as for bank purposes. ...


5

Don’t do this, some cards have the 3 digit confirmation code on the back . Sending the account number which can also be the IBAN number and a sorting code should be sufficient.


-4

Other answers say “no” and I initially thought the same, but I’m going to suggest a slightly different approach. There is a way you could (note the emphasis on the conditional) get out of this with $50,000 (what you seem to be wanting now), but it will take more than just “oh sorry I changed my mind”. If you do that you’ll be crammed, and rightly so. ...


-1

The employer owes you nothing. You agreed to a salary they offered. So fulfill the contract. When I got my Bachelor's Degree my employer gave me a pay bump without asking, unexpectedly. You can hope they do that, but they're not obligated. You'll see a raise when you sign your next contract, or at the end of your trial time. Work toward that, ...


136

Is it safe to do so? Based on my experience this is not normal practice and not safe. The company doesn't need a copy of your debit card in order to pay you. There are several security concerns when faxing, emailing, or sharing this information in general. What I would do is provide my checking account number and routing number so they can pay me. If ...


12

The best thing to do is ask for an explanation and provide appropriate information. In all likelihood, your employer is working to set up payroll for you. It doesn't hurt to make a quick call or email to a recruiter or manager inquiring about the request. You can always phrase your question as "I want to make sure I get you the right information, can you ...


33

This doesn't sound like a good idea. A classmate working in the same company where I will start in September is planning to renegotiate his salary after graduation. Never base your decisions on someone else's thought process. Give it a thought keeping your own personal position in mind. Do you think I can make the same request, or would it be better ...


-3

Having been in the recruiting industry myself, i think it is fair to tell a recruiter that you will only consider roles that pay higher than your current one. However if that is the only thing that motivates you to make a change, in a hot market it can make you appear like a risky person to work with. Recruiting a candidate, coordinating interviews, ...


0

I wouldn’t do anything until you have a job offer in writing. You do not want to tell your manager you almost have another job. If a job offer comes your way then you have a decision to make. You will have to weigh the pluses and minuses of each position. I can’t help on which way to go. You have no control over when a job offer comes your way. Don’...


58

It would show two things about you: 1- You are completely money driven and will jump ship at the first opportunity - hence you're a bad investment for the company 2- You don't think things through - hence you're a bad investment for the company You will very possibly find they rescind the offer.


60

No way. You already asked for more. If I was the hiring manager and you asked again I would rescind your offer. You got a nice increase in salary. Be happy. Take the job and stop negotiating.


177

No. You have already bumped them up by a significant percentage with your email; by going back on what you said a second time you will create one of two impressions - that you don't know what you actually want, or that you still won't be satisfied even if they give you more. Neither is good. Stick with the second offer, and if you really think you deserve ...


1

In most countries, if there is a dispute then they cannot just deduct money from your salary. They can take you to court over the cost of the iPad obviously, but they can't just take it out of your salary. That said, if you don't have that iPad, I'd tell the company that you don't have this iPad (either you never had it at all, or you never took it home, or ...


0

This is a very common HR 101 trick. Over time I am seeing this more and more from new job offers. It means nothing, it's just the first thing most hr recruiters will say right out of the gate during negotiations. Be polite, but ask why it's non negotiable. Be inquisitive and express your desire to find a compromise. See if you can talk to the hiring ...


11

Go see a lawyer. It sounds like the company is trying pin something on you and the most effective defense is a registered letter by a lawyer and that a) clearly states that you have followed all processes and procedures, b) and that they should cease and desist in making false accusations or you will take formal legal action. I many cases a formal letter ...


4

Should I accept company A back instead? That would be my recommendation. What is the intention for company A to counter offer me since I already "betrayed" company A by switching to company B Exactly what your manager said: Team valued my potential and willing to learn attitude.


2

Well, you said company A is your dream job so I'd go with them. It's not about the money if both companies are offering the same amount. There's an old saying that if you ask for a certain price and the other guy says, 'yes' quickly then it means that you didn't ask for enough. Company A. must have been willing to pay you far more long before company B. ...


6

Can they charge me for something they have no actual proof I have? No... but if you actually have it then you should return it, or well keep it if you want it but you are going to have to buy it. If you really don't have it, and they are claiming for it, politely reply indicating that you do not possess such item and ask them to double-check, and that if ...


8

Frame challenge: I wouldn't respond to unsolicited recruiters at all. It just gives them hope that your contact info will some day bear fruit. When you're open to new job opportunities, you locate a recruiter that is relatively respected in your industry (or has contacts with a company that interests you) and you reach out to them. At that point, as the ...


7

It's not rude at all to express certain requirements that are an important factor for you to consider leaving your current position which you are happy with. It's definitly in your interest to provide such information when contacted by a recruiter. Being in a similar position (I'm quite content about my current role and my paycheck), I was also contacted ...


2

No matter what is going to be discussed, don't blame your colleague. The reason he's earning the same pay isn't just based off his actual performance. Maybe he brought better arguments to the salary negotiation, maybe it's because his field of study is more related to the job. It could be due to a lot of reasons you possibly couldn't be aware of. He also ...


2

How should approach the situation with my manager? You can ask your manager about how does your manager evaluate you. Your appraisal of performance might be biased, while your manager appraisal of performance might be subjective. Based on what your manager said if your manager willing to disclose it out of the annual contract review, you could get the hang ...


7

Short answer: What your colleague earns is completely irrelevant, pitch a pay rise on evidence that you are worth the more money. You shouldn't mention what your colleague earns, it's irrelevant in terms of what you are worth. If you think you are worth a pay rise, then provide evidence around what the pay scales are for someone with your level of ...


3

Speak with your manager. If you have an annual interview for performance and career, it's the time to mention why you deserve a raise. Don't compare yourself to others, stick to your own performance during your time at this job. Support your claim with data : what have you done which is over-performing ? What task have you accomplished ? What did you learn ...


1

Depending on your relationship with your manager, you could simply ask for a raise. Suggesting or implying you want a raise can be good and all, but if you want more, you should ask. I would not bother mentioning your other colleague. Your not going to get paid more because your colleague performed worse than you. You will get paid more based on the merits ...


70

Why would it be rude? Is it rude to tell the salesman what color car you want? Is it rude to tell the chef how you want your steak cooked? Is it rude to tell the dry cleaner that you want your shirts starched? It's not rude to tell people what you want. Be courteous and professional, and tell them what you want.


177

No, it's not rude. If that's what the situation is with you, be polite but clear. Thanks for reaching out At this stage I would only be looking at offers at a total compensation of over $X (before tax). Are you able to detail the compensation range for this role? Many regards, BI You are saving both of you some time.


6

Checking FedDev Ontario Small Business Services led me to this other page on employment standards. On it, on the Training Time section we can read (emphasis mine): Training time Time spent by an employee in training that is required by the employer or by law is counted as work time. For example, where the training is required because the employee is ...


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