New answers tagged

3

Taking legal or regulatory action against a company is a huge pain in the neck. It will probably take dozens of hours of your time. Ask yourself whether it's worth your trouble. Your choices: TIME-CONSUMING: go after them in some legalistic way. NASTY: post the data anonymously on pastebin or otherwise "out" them. POLITE: reply to the person who sent the ...


3

Even though it might feel good to send the info back to all the employees, to "punish" the employer, on the long run it will hurt you more or less. It is irrelevant if you love or if you hate the said employer. The best thing to do is: remain professional; send a reply email to whoever sent you the information, telling them about the data leak; also ask ...


3

Yes, this would be a very good deal for you, if you can manage your overtime in the future. Salaries normally never go down. Increases in salary pay off year after year until you leave the company. Sure, you can hit a ceiling where you simply do not get more, but they won't take it away from you (in a sane company). So: your goal is to take the increase, ...


2

You asked, In short, is the agency friend or foe? Neither - they're more like lawful neutral. They will generally follow whatever path has the best outcome for them. Sometimes, in a perfect world, that path also has a good outcome for the employer and the candidate. But in other situations, the three parties' objectives may not perfectly align, and some ...


1

The recruitment agency takes a percentage of the salary that the client pays. In this case employee and agency share the same interest. No, the potential employee and the recruiting agency may share an interest, but it's not necessarily the same exact interest. Let's say a competing candidate (without an agency) is willing to work for $100,000 a ...


12

Whether you take the job or not makes a huge difference to the recruitement agency. They get paid, or they get not paid. The payment may be dependent on the salary, but that is a very minor amount to them. So the motivation of the recruitement agency is to do anything to make the company offer you the job and to make you accept the job. So if the ...


2

All in all, the first and foremost target for the recruitment agency is to get you a job, because then they will get their commission. If you don't get (or accept) the job, there's no incentive for them. So they will try to convince both the parties: The applicant: that the job is good, and should accept the payment offered. The organization: that the ...


2

You also may want to check if the overtime hours are taxed like the standard ones. In France for instance, the first 5000€ from overtime are free from taxes.


1

IMO this is fine so long as you consider and mitigate the 2 big potential risks: 1) Seeing as Overtime is now "expected" as part of your base salary, what rights do you have to decide not to work overtime when it's asked of you? 2) What guarantees, if any, do you have on how many hours of overtime you're expected to work? You should ask HR to clarify the ...


1

HR wants to do this as it removes the overhead of managing overtime,and the danger of you deciding to stop working it. In return they are consolidating your pay and adding additional benefits which is good, as others have pointed out e.g. mortgage applications, sick pay etc. It's definitely a win win as long as you are happy with current levels of ...


7

The new conditions you describe are standard practice in the UK for software engineers and the tech industry generally. In fact, I'm amazed there is anywhere that actually pays overtime at all! So to answer question 1 they may just want to realign their terms and conditions to the industry standard. It's also a more predictable cost (for accounting purposes)...


7

Just wanted to add a single aspect: it is generally a good idea to increase base salary as opposed to bonus or overtime pay as it is much harder to take that back. It is also better for negotiations in the next job or if you want to convince bank or landlords. If this is worth it, that's another question. But I would think that the monetary value of a ...


10

There is one easily overlooked advantage to changing from hourly overtime to a salary that is equal to what you would get before. Which is your pay when on leave. If on leave you don't work the overtime, but are still paid your regular pay. This means if overtime is making up a significant portion of your pay, and you take extended leave, you are down a ...


6

You are suggesting 10-15% after 6 months, there I would say in general no, not appropriate. In the first few months at a new company you still need to learn how everything works, what the projects are, familiarize yourself with everything. That means you are creating little to no value for the company. That's normal and expected, so no reason to worry about ...


10

Is it appropriate to request a salary raise after trial/probation period is complete? IMO asking for a raise after only 6 month, regardless of performance, could be seen as a little greedy, since you already had your 'Lohnverhandlung' (salary-discussion) during the hiring process just a couple of months ago. You and the company agreed on the terms and the ...


2

I simply want to know if it is appropriate to do so or not? It is only appropriate, if it can be justified. If you believe you're worth of getting paid more, prepare a case and present it to your boss and ask for a raise. Two things to keep in mind: Don't expect a raise because you feel like getting a raise. Don't be shy to ask for a raise if you feel ...


34

There are some advantages in having a high basic salary than salary + overtime and if you say money wise they work out the same lets explore those. Mortgage application - When applying for a mortgage you will be able to borrow more with a higher basic salary than salary plus overtime as overtime is not always guaranteed whereas your basic salary is. This ...


4

This sounds like a bad deal, unless some safeguards are in place. The why of it does not concern you, as long as you realize should know that you are solving a problem for someone else by accepting this offer. Somebody wins by selling you on the idea. You express a worry that overtime may increase. That makes me suspect that there are not enough controls ...


12

I don't know laws in UK, but in Germany there's one huge difference between overtime being paid hourly instead of generally more salary: you can decide if you take money or additional holidays. With my previous employer I always worked overtime, and prolonged my holidays with that. There was also the possibility to take "bridging days" with overtime, when ...


0

Same here last month with my raise after probation, written in my contract. But instead of contacting my boss I went straight to HR next time I was in office. There, I did not talk about an "error". I simply showed her my contract and asked as innocently as possible where I'd have to go to get the promised raise. I asked if I'd have to have a one-on-one-...


109

What could be the reason for the company doing this, is it to somehow cut costs? HR are insisting this is a good deal and I should take it. It sort of indirectly helps them cut costs - mainly because it reduces the admin overhead in HR/Payroll. Is this generally a good deal? My worry is overtime expectation may increase in the future. Usually my overtime ...


15

To answer the first one, if the company requires a lot of overtime from you then it is a very good deal for them. You could potentially work even more hours, and they then get that free. Is it a good deal for you? That is open to opinion and you need to weigh up different factors. It will partially depend on the contract, are there any clauses ...


41

As per usual - HR is not your friend. Of course, they will say the deal is good for you. Hint: your raise is probably calculated the same way you calculated it. Amount of paid overtime last year divided by 12. There is a trick there. The number of hours would need to be less than those you worked last year. Why less? Because the minimum wage was raised ...


9

If it were me I would wait until the next pay cycle. If it still isn't reflected in your pay then I would simultaneously address it with your boss and with your HR department. Make sure that your raise is retroactive to the date it was supposed to be reflected in your pay.


2

Yes A salary review every year (or even every 6 months at some places) is not unusual in most jobs (at least the ones I've been at). Obviously your job doesn't have this structure, but I don't think it's unreasonable to ask for a review after 12 months since your last. Just set up a meeting with your boss and discuss all your achievements over the last 12 ...


5

I think you should get this cleared first if they have an annual performance review or not. You should contact the HR of the company to get clarity on the same. it's appropiate for me to ask for a review this year? Yes, absolutely yes! If you're working so hard and if the company has a review policy then why not? Why not ask for what you deserve? or ...


2

I found this source on Swiss Data Protection Laws. The most relevant bit appears to be in Section 8.1 How do employee data protection rights affect the employment relationship? Can an employer transfer employee data freely to other countries? The employer may handle data concerning the employee only to the extent that such data concerns the employee'...


3

But besides information regarding my working ethos, etc. are employers allowed to exchange information regarding my salary? IANAL, but from what I've read: No, this does not seem to be allowed and may be a breach of Swiss data protection regulations by your former employer. A former employer must adhere to what is stated in the employer's reference when ...


0

The Monday morning after attending my graduation ceremony, I was suddenly 30% more valuable to my employer than I had been the Friday before. The degree doesn’t guarantee you’re worth more, but having that diploma and a huge amount of experience in comparison to where you were a year ago, does make you more marketable. From there, Kaz lays out sound advice....


1

You are worth whatever you can negotiate for yourself in the job market. Go job hunting, get yourself a written offer somewhere else, and that will tell you what you're worth. Once you have that offer, what you do with it is up to you. If you're willing to take the other job, you probably should. If you want to keep your current job, you should turn down ...


0

Graduating doesn't entitle you to a pay rise, and neither does working for any number of years. Becoming proficient in the tech stack and gaining certification are important, because they make you more useful. The question is then whether you're being paid the market rate. It may be that you were recruited with the assumption that you'd do these things, and ...


0

No. You haven’t reached the next Award yet. You mentioned in a comment that you’re from Australia, and the job offer you accepted was standard for university graduates. This means that it is most likely an Award. For our international readers, the minimum wage in Australia varies depending on the field of work, the highest qualification you possess (e.g. ...


5

Graduating from University isn't likely to be a reason to increase your pay. After all, the company likely hired you on, knowing that you would continue to work for them after you graduated. What you should focus on is your skills and completed tasks. The certification is certainly a big deal because that's time, money and effort you and the company sank to ...


3

In my career I follow one rule - always ask more than you have had before. Because you got more experience, more knowledge etc. Also I often ask 10%-15% more than I really "cost" because I want to have a buffer for salary negotiations. Don't worry your employer also does the same trick. In your current situation I would ask for 750000 INR since your ...


-3

This isn't school where a 9.5 out of 10 is a grade of "A". Grades cost nothing, this is the real world. Your pay and increases have little to do with your personal performance. It has much more to do with their budget, the current company's financial health, and the market value of your skills. Don't expect to get the increase you want, and even if they give ...


0

If you truly want a raise, update your resume and apply for a job in another company. You have already been shown that you are only worth what they are paying you now by staying there.


2

Pragmatic view You do not provide more value, based on the fact alone, that someone in your department left and is not being replaced. If that was the case, then any department losing people should ask for raises. In any case, reading the question I was expecting to hear, that you now took the leading role and hence look to leverage this for a raise, as ...


3

This is definitely a bad idea. First of all, “how much money the company has” isn’t what they pay you. “What you’re worth to them” is what they pay you. Your value has not improved by someone else being fired and replaced. Furthermore, it’s in bad taste, and marks you as a scavenger. There’s always people picking over the goods of the fired, trying to ...


7

That is a bad idea. mitigate possible discussions about company's economy problems The discussion will not be We don't have enough money to give you a raise. What they are trying to say is: You are not worth as much as you think you are Money is not abstract, it is relative to the value. If your company doesn't value you at the level you think you ...


0

It's not entirely clear to me what you're asking, but it seems like you're asking if you can ask for a 22% raise. You can ask for whatever you want. They may give you the raise you ask for, or they may offer a lesser raise, or they may refuse to give you a raise altogether. How you choose to proceed is up to you. If you don't get the raise you ask for you ...


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