New answers tagged

15

This happens all the time. Constantly. It's "your loss" unfortunately and that's that. Pay, politely explain that the work was disappointing, and move on, never use them again (unless in the future you change your mind). Unfortunately all you describe is "the job was done poorly". All design work is subjective, and, (as with musicians!) ...


0

Beware of using sites like Glassdoor as anything more than an indication. Generally speaking things that tend to increase the salary you can command include: Management experience of any sort, project or other people Years of experience with key technologies Experience with rare technologies/skills Having worked on similar projects in the past Presenting ...


5

There are 365 days in a year*. There are (365/7)/2 = 26.071 bi-weekly periods in a year. $91000/26.071 = $3490.468 So yes, you are missing something here. $3500*26.071 - $91000 = $248.50 You're getting $248.50 more per annum. *there are approx 365.25, but let's ignore leap years..


63

In my offer letter is says my salary is - "At a biweekly rate of $3,500.00 which annualizes to approximately $91,000.00" however, $3500 * 24 = $84,000. Am I missing something here? There are 26 biweekly periods, so 26 * $3,500 = $91,000. This is an understandable confusion. It seems to make sense to divide a monthly stated salary in half when ...


1

You don't give a number, you give a range. The high number means you start tomorrow. The low number means you continue looking to find something better, and you'll take theirs only if you are totally desperate because you can't find any other offer elsewhere. It's up to the company to decide what they offer, depending on how much they want you. The more they ...


5

If you are indeed sure that you are being considered for the position because the company wants to economize on its salaries by having some of its work outsourced to remote workers in other/cheaper countries, you could do the following. There are various lists available with comparative cost-of-living indexes of various countries. For example https://www....


-9

I have nothing but good news for you, My problem is that this is a remote position for an international company This is the common and normal situation. All high-end development is "remote" and/or "internationalized", and always has been. If you think you somehow make or pay less "because one party is in area X" - the good ...


1

What you are experiencing is typical. There are really only two remedies, and you already tried one and that did not work: Get promoted, or new job title. Often this will loosen the HR rules, but not always. Once the rules are off the table the manager is free to give you a large raise. This did not work for you, so you only have the other option. Move ...


3

I've been through a very similar situation. It's red tape and politics. If the company has set a maximum possible raise percentage, there's often little you can do about it. It becomes even harder in large companies where everyone must blindly follow the rules. Even if they make no sense. I joined a company at a junior salary, and got a small pay rise each ...


0

I agree with others; just ask. I have never talked to a recruiter who could not give a number. (Or if I did... I didn't talk to him more than once.) And then if the range is too low, just politely tell the recruiter what it will take for you to consider the position. As you alluded to... you really cannot be sure if you'll like the work, or the new ...


7

Is my contract collectively bargained or a personal contract? It's an ordinary job contract and has no connection, at all, to the Unions, in any way. It is completely, utterly, unrelated to the unions in any way. (There may be some confusion about the Union-related term of art "personal contract" - which has simply utterly no connection to the ...


2

Option 1 Take the 50k job (10k increase), work 1 year, look for the next job with another 10k increase. Option 2 Apply only to jobs where you can demonstrate your value, either by networking and having their employees vouch for you, or by presenting at conferences, or by researching target companies well and being able to confidently claim you're a prefect ...


3

This is a problem of relativity. Your experience is not the same as theirs. Your opinion on an acceptable work/life balance and the compensation to justify it is not the same as theirs. I don't know German wages well enough to comment on the objective numbers. Though I am in a neighboring country, and €40k for a junior developer position is quite an ...


25

They aren't ignorant, that's what the local market rate is As you have seen in multiple attempts already, the market rate for junior developers in those cities apparently is not 55.000 EUR, it is what it is. It does not mean that they're ignorant about what quality of life the lower pay implies, they are asserting (as you have seen and described here) that ...


0

I'd say 55k isn't completely unreasonable, but the 15k increase in cost of living is, and that comes across as a bit weird -- basically the only way this would be accurate is if you lived rent-free with your parents right now. My negotiation strategy would include a bit of an increase in "base" salary, as you are more experienced than when you ...


71

A company could not care less about why you need the money. If your rich aunt had a flat right next to their company and lend it to you rentfree, would you work there for 30k ? They have a budget for the position you apply for and they will stick to this budget, unless you can prove you will bring value in a way they did not think about when they opened the ...


19

Problem is you're trying to justify yourself. You tell them what your salary expectations are (always say it's a little higher than it actually is), that's it. End of. There isn't really anything to say if your expected salary is beyond what a company has budget for... only apply for positions that offer your expected salary. If you try to justify yourself, ...


7

The issue you are probably having is that these places are expensive to for an individual. If you had a partner who was also earning 45-50k Euro you would be fine living there. I get this a lot in the UK too, places offering lowball amounts to live in London or some other expensive place, on the assumption that you have two wages. All you can do is explain ...


87

After quite a few of these talks, I am a bit baffled that so many companies based in major > cities just act clueless about the costs of living They aren't clueless, instead they have and proceed with candidates who are willing to work for the 45-50k range. Many people house-share and do much longer commutes than 2h a day total. For those a studio ...


3

"Does this new role come with an increase in salary?" seems an appropriate way to ask.


2

You make an offer and they take it or leave it. In a lot of cases, there is very little flexibility on the salary range. I used to work for the government and those ranges were set in meetings with a bunch of people. I could never imagine them being re-done for a particular candidate if simply because it would take a long time to get those people together. ...


3

You can't make them do anything. If they grant you and interview and offer you the job, you can accept the salary they offer you, negotiate a higher salary, or decline their offer.


46

The only hard rule in business is that there are no hard rules. My suggestion is that you consider the new job and the counteroffer, and do what you think is best for you. I once accepted a counteroffer, and I do not regret having done so. My employer didn't start looking for replacements, there was no discussion about my loyalty, and I was pretty happy with ...


10

Simple Rule of Counter Offers: Does it protect you from the following situation? The company raises your pay/benefits/whatever to stop you leaving today They immediately start training/hiring someone to replace you In 2 months, once they've mitigated any damage from you leaving and got someone to replace you, they let you go The answer is almost always &...


106

TLDR: NEVER ACCEPT A COUNTER OFFER: More nuanced answer: While there are exceptions, they are very very rare, and the odds are you won't be one of them. 80% of people who accept counter offers are gone from that company within 6 months, at the 12 month mark that goes up to 90% also cited here, and here, and by US News and world report here as well as Linked ...


10

but I have to wait until.... Forget it, walk away, get out of there as soon as you possibly can, and start at the new job the first day possible. How should I proceed ... As always when quitting a company, simply be extremely polite and direct. (There are literally 100s of questions on this site with copy-and-paste "how to resign" emails.) So ...


61

The moment you told your current employer you had another offer, you got marked. You need to move now. They now know (or perceive) you as a non-loyal employee. I have to wait until March 2021. Huge red flag. They know that by then the other offer will be gone. If they wanted to pay you this much, if they thought you were worth it, they'd have done it ...


Top 50 recent answers are included