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192

You give the scrummaster a weird look, and you say “bye Felicia,” and the next day you call a meeting of the whole team and ask them what the hell that nonsense was all about. If this actually happened, then I’d fire the idiot scrummaster in a New York minute. This scrummaster is dangerous, unprofessional, and wildly unfit for his job. The way to actually “...


133

You are worrying about nothing. Software has bugs, that is inevitable, and everyone knows it. QA finds bugs, hopefully puts them into a bug tracking system, and you take one bug from the bug tracker, fix it, then the next one and so on until you are finished. There is no need to mention where this bug comes from. Nobody cares. If someone asks you why there ...


110

Reading your question and while completely agreeing with keshlam's answer, I think the right question to ask is, as a manager, "how can you get your boss to prioritise new work rather than imposing an increase in workload without considering the impact on the team?" If you are: Late in a sprint (and potentially on time); and Asked to add something into the ...


96

I don't understand why you're worried. They're all under you in the hierarchy, and don't have the power to fire you. More importantly, you need to work out what the hell is going on. The scrum master himself might need to be terminated depending on the situation. Do it before it's too late, before your boss (or CIO) says the same thing to you.


82

While I've worked with a number of teams who have followed this same course of action, it does not sound like this was handled with the care it warrants. I'd like to share what I've seen to see if it helps give you an avenue forward. First, Scrum does encourage self-organizing teams. What the Scrum Guide specifically says about self organizing teams is this:...


75

In the context of scrum: What does the product owner say? It is not the function of the scrum master to ask for more (or less) resources. This is something the Product owner needs to align with the stakeholders In the context of scrum: A retrospective is about the process and the team and the project (not about "how do i feel about my boss"). If you were ...


64

What can I say during the meeting that isn't rude to let her know that she is going way too long? I would like to tell her in person rather than an email. You have the right idea, but the wrong approach. Do tell her in person, rather than by email. But don't say it during the meeting (unless all else fails). Since there is only one person at issue here,...


57

The Agile Manifesto does indeed welcome late changes, see point 4: Responding to change over following a plan And the scrum guide has this: During the Sprint: No changes are made that would endanger the Sprint Goal; Quality goals do not decrease; and, Scope may be clarified and re-negotiated between the Product Owner and Development Team as more is ...


50

I've stressed to the team the benefits of self-organizing teams and team empowerment. Well, they certainly took that part to heart. It seems clear that you're in very emotional situation right now. Apparently, your team has some major issues with the current relationship between you and them. It was probably a good thing you weren't at the retrospective, ...


41

What does "deadline" mean? There's the kind of deadline where your company signed a contract and will lose a million dollar payment if you don't deliver on Monday, and if you don't finish the job before Monday, you might as well not bother coming to work because there is no money to pay you. And there is the kind of "deadline" where your boss promised his ...


39

I've noticed that it's quite common for these grooming sessions to only involve one or two people actively. Generally speaking there's a few folks who enjoy discussing talking requirements and a few who just want to be told what to build. Your manager is on to something by saying it's not efficient for everyone to be there. Not everyone needs to be at a ...


32

In the stand up, you should just state the facts: Yesterday, I worked on bug #532 about the widgets being the wrong colour. Completed that and it's ready for the next deployment. Today, I'm going to work on bug #536 about the crash when trying to order more widgets. Potentially blocked because I don't understand the interactions with the back-end ...


31

No, this is definitely not a normal behaviour, and should never be the way to write software. There are generally three options: 1) Discuss the issue with the upper management You will need support from the whole team to do this, but the output may be even worse culture, and you may lose your job. If you go with this, be really careful; try to find out what ...


31

Whether or not they have actual power to fire you as their manager, you brought this situation upon yourself by mandating a change to scrum simply because you prefer it. You did not discuss it with them. You might have been within your rights as the manager, but it was nonetheless a dumb thing to do, and of course they now question whether they want to work ...


31

how can we decide to give (or not) a rise to someone when he ask for it, without knowing his individual performance? In every company where I have ever worked, the individual's manager determined the raise based on a number of factors - place within a salary range, individual performance, market conditions, company conditions, budget, etc, etc. None of ...


29

You are not using the Scrum terms, so I'm guessing you are not actually doing Scrum. My first advice would be to get a good book or better yet trainer. Your product team is what is called Stakeholders. And indeed, talking to the stakeholders finding requirements is not the Development Teams job. The Product Owner talks to the stakeholders. The Product ...


26

A different perspective: did it occur to you they are simply making fun of the Scrum process and its "self-organizing" aspect? Frankly, I can't imagine they were serious at all and had a good laugh while reading your post. Software developers (I am one) tend to be pretty cynical people with dry sense of humor that not everybody likes or even recognizes. I am ...


26

Generally, if the following are true about an employee you observe performing unsatisfactorily: the employee doesn't report to you; you have no supervisory or performance responsibility for them, the employee's performance is not directly impacting your own deliverables, Others who do have responsibility for the employee are already aware of their actions ...


26

Though I would like to avoid him in any which way, should I report this behavior to my bosses in company A or at the client directly? This situation definitely needs to be worked through your direct manager. You don't want to take the chance of damaging the relationship with the client -- that could potentially get you fired. At any rate you did your ...


25

Yes, and you should disclose that you have been directed to focus on your other project so that the team can be aware that you are not currently making any progress on your assigned tasks. Unless directed otherwise, or you are unable to attend do to a conflict, you should always attend stand-ups even if you currently have no tasks. The daily stand-ups are ...


24

Your boss has the right to ask. You have the right to decline. Your boss has the right to consider your answer when employee review time comes around. Pick your battles, and consider that companies do tend to remember who is and isn't willing to make an extra effort when the company is hard up against a deadline.


24

My team has been trying to transition to Scrum for some time now, I would say it hasn't. Scrum terms have been flung around and misused, but that's it. There is no transition visible. A transition would need Scrum Masters leading it. A plan how to transition (maybe as it's own Scrum project). And support from upper management. I can see neither in your ...


24

What can help me find a better balance between the two? As you do Scrum, there is a time and place to bring this up: The retrospective meeting. In the next retrospective meeting, talk about it. Talk about the fact that moving the daily stand-up to (let's say) 11:00 would improve your productivity. Find a solution with the team. They may not understand your ...


23

Hold meetings every two hours to increase productivity? That's just an obvious plain crazy idea. How can this even be considered seriously? However if you really need arguments against this idea. As said before, more time in meetings = more time not doing any actual work. Most of the time nothing meaningful will have changed in the last two hours. It's ...


20

Your problem is in the first sentence: I'm a scrum master and also project manager You have 2 roles that are at odds with each other. A Scrum master has two remits: Remove obstacles Ensure the agreed process is followed and coach where it is not Notice I don't say anything about meeting deadlines, there are no deadlines in Scrum. You work in set ...


20

There is a key point being missed in the answers - the company is in Asia. There is a cultural component that needs to be called out and separately considered. Many asians are uncomfortable voicing an individual opinion when in a group. As the practice lead / scrum coach / agile evangelist, you need to ensure the development team know that it's a safe ...


20

Show your management this answer, telling them that if your description is right, then this is about the most incompetent "scrum master" I've ever heard of. And that person is indeed not a scrum master. The scrum master's responsibility is to make sure that there are stories ready, make sure that these stories have reasonable story points, to make sure ...


19

If your task is blocked, it sounds like you should have a lot to say during the Daily Scrum. You and your team need to talk about what's going to happen now. I mean, I'm going to assume that your task wasn't placed on the backlog to keep you occupied. Generally speaking, tasks on the backlog are important. And they are important soon. But the task is not ...


18

1) Don't make it sound like I'm speaking badly about the code or the former employee that left, who's work I'm fixing. Well, you talk about the problems in the code, without mentioning the why (or whom) part, bugs are there and they need to be fixed - that's it. 2) Try not to make myself look bad as I'm going to be busy fixing something that didn't pass ...


18

In a comment, you clarified your question as, what options might exist to fix the short term outlook of the developers which is making its way into the code? Rather than directly address the specific challenges you're describing (i.e. how to deal with your frustrating Scrum Master), I think it's more valuable to step back, zoom out, and consider a ...


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