13

It avoids the risk (to them) of your being reclassified (by the CRA) to be their employee and for them being liable retroactively to pay the employer portion of payroll taxes (plus interest and maybe penalties). You could also demand pay in lieu of notice, vacation pay etc. if you decided to call yourself an employee. You need to talk to a Quebec-based tax ...


13

First of, I feel obliged to challenge your frame of reference a little bit since you’re inexperienced (by your own account) and there are certain conceptions that are really wrong. First of all, not all employment is bad. Most of the population of the world are employees and they do get by just fine. Just because some of the references around are bad, don’t ...


12

This is obviously USA. The employment taxes (social security and medicare) amount to 15.3% of your gross wages. When you're a W2 employee, your employer pays half of this and withholds the other half from your paycheck. When you're independent (1099) you're expected to pay the whole amount yourself, from the money you earn. You need to file a quarterly ...


12

I think you answered your own question there. If you don't think you have delivered something to the standards required and you have only done a couple of test prints and not printed a pallet-ton, then you can show that as a proof of concept to the client, say that you would need the original images to be able to make it look better and that there are some ...


11

I have been a self-emploeyd developer myself, here in Germany. There are several things you need to consider. You have to register your business with the local authorities. You´ll get a tax-number for registering VAT (Ust. id number). You need this number to write invoices and pay the VAT. You´ll have to do some bookkeeping and reporting of your turnover (...


11

Just resign as normal. Don't mention it before hand. Then when asked why you're resigning give your reasons politely. But don't mention you're thinking you may get work from him. Leave that to his imagination.


11

Arrange a 1-1 chat with your boss and lay out your plan, you'll need to stress that you're pressing ahead with your plan to move self-employed regardless but that you respect your boss and your current employer's business needs and feel that the move to part time would be mutually beneficial as they would continue to have access to your skills and knowledge (...


10

But it is a lot of money and if they don't want me doing accounting for them any more I will lose money. What can be done? Well, given you are self-employer this is in part a risk you have to decide if you want to take. If your relationship with this client seems stable, then you could consider it. Otherwise, if you feel it's just temporary then I would ...


9

You pretty much know your choices, given that they do not appear willing to negotiate about this. Suck it up and deal with it. Drop them as a client. While I've not had this specific issue, I've had clients who have their own peculiarities as far as billing goes and sometimes they were a real pain. I've had a couple I did have to drop because they wanted ...


9

Never let clients dictate payment terms to you. I have had just about everything tried on me. My response has lost me some clients, but they almost always come back and I charge a higher rate when they do. Basically you just upfront inform them you're not satisfied with payments and it's changing to whatever you decide. Warn them when they don't comply and ...


8

Before I start I should say I am a self-employed contractor working out of the UK and I am not a qualified tax lawyer so this advice is purely my understanding. But this IS what I do. You are a self-employed contractor. If you are operating outside of IR35 you should have in your contract that you are expected to work on a deliverable and what project that ...


8

I would like to try and fix it, but I am no longer quite as confident in my skills in this area. Maybe I can fix it with the original pictures, but maybe I can't. Either way, I am not sure that I should bill for the time that I spent on the brochure since it was not a product that was to the level the client was expecting. He hasn't asked me not to ...


6

As an employer, I was generally happy when my staff enjoyed what they did at work so much that they also did it on their own time. This was generally a benefit for me, since they would be learning things without my having to invest in training them. (Sometimes what they were learning was how hard it can be to run a company, which is priceless information I ...


6

I would like to quit and offer to take that contract position at two days a week until they have fully replaced me. What would be the best way of approaching my boss with this proposed plan for converting to part time? If you are comfortable enough to be honest with your boss, that would be your best move. It sounds as if your plans are firm, so I ...


5

Any advice? Talk to the 3rd party background check company, and ask them how they would like you to handle this scenario.


5

The CRA uses a multi-question test to determine whether you are an independent contractor or an employee. (There are special rules for Quebec: scroll down.) Nothing in these rules mentions being incorporated, having a separate bank account for the business, having a business phone that is different from your personal phone and is listed in the phone book, ...


5

If you're getting paid software developer rates to train someone, I see that as a win! If you don't want to do it, just say "no thanks". To avoid offense, be modest and tell them you don't have the experience to train someone as well as the specialist training providers, maybe recommend one. If you do decide to take it on, consider drawing up a separate ...


4

How will breaking off on my own affect my career if I decide to come back to corporate workplaces? I've interviewed many previously self-employed folks for permanent positions. I've hired some, and rejected others. When reading resumes and interviewing, my biggest concerns are: Does this individual really want to be an employee, or an entrepreneur? If ...


4

Self employed actually doesn't look that great on a CV, many employers are wary of hiring entrepreneurs. And a self-employed person looking for a full time job sometimes comes across as a failure. In saying that you can get as creative as you want in a CV, I've seen much more unlikely and downright dishonest CV's over the years. It's up to you how you ...


4

Sounds like you're looking for something like Amazon Mechanical Turk. It's a marketplace where people perform short tasks (like describing images, transcribing audio, etc.) in exchange for money.


4

My main question is, how do I tell my boss that this is what I want to do? Being the only two people in the business at present make it feel harder for me to do. I want him to know it's not a personal thing but just something I feel I need to do but not sure how to do that succinctly. I'm looking to go in December, so would be giving my 30 day notice in ...


4

IMHO. you can list the technologies and project types you worked with. Also, portfolio of examples and interesting solutions would be nice addition to an interview, especially, if your work is done for Web / Cloud.


4

Normally a good rule of thumb is to triple your day rate as an employee when going self employed if your committing to a long contract of a year or more you could reduce this a bit. Pseudo self employed - This worries me in many countries the tax authorities see this as disguised employment and treat it as tax evasion. You would need to check carefully ...


4

What kinds of 'work' could a person do to be self-employed? You can do any kind of work that someone would give you money to do. Some people play music on the sidewalk. Some people consult to Fortune 500 companies. There are an endless number of possibilities. Think about your skills. Think about how you could convince someone to pay you for using those ...


3

Pretty much anything that can be stopped/started at a moments notice. Studying for certifications is always worthwhile although you don't get immediate return. I knew a guy who knitted Rastafarian hats and had a steady source of income out of it. All you need is a product and a market. I think making and selling something you own is best.


3

Just a Brainstorming from my personal experience: Professional Indemnity that covers also damages resulting from your programming errors. Terms and conditions that exclude any liability that is not covered by your P&I. For some clients you will end up working two times the amount that you actually invoice. If that happens, raise your rate just for that ...


3

I live in the US, so maybe things are different here. But I think every client I've ever had works this way. It's quite routine. I presume they don't pay the invoice the day they get it, I think it's fairly typical for companies to take a month to pay. So from when you do the work to when you get paid is likely 2 months, maybe 3. For a freelancer or small ...


3

I can't speak as to what is legal in Germany - others may better advise you in that regard - but generally speaking, if you sign the contract, you are legally bound by it. At this point you should look at the situation with the assumption that they are within their legal right to ask that of you. The question is: How much will that clause affect you? Are ...


3

You should read your contract first. If there is no signs about possible penalties you should go ahead. Also in my contracting career I have never saw a contract not describing early resignation and notice periods. In terms of burning bridges you should ask yourself what is important to you? Is this a good client? Is it worth keeping it intact? Also this ...


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