658

How about you wait for the interview before you judge that person... Not everyone is interested in climbing the corporate ladder Maybe there was no other position suited for them at the company At least it tells you that they are good enough to be kept around for over a decade Maybe they love what they do so much that they don't consider other positions ...


288

"Hey, you made this X change to that Y function. This change breaks my code because it's not taking Z in account, and Z is what happens on my side. Is it ok with you to do K to fix it?" You need to make this less personal. There is no my code and your code. Both of you are employees of a company, and that company owns the code. You merely wrote it, but ...


280

Asking for help when you don't know something isn't weak - no one person can know all the details of each technology they will encounter. And assuming that it's not happening with every aspect of the job, but instead on specific things where you know a colleague has specific knowledge that will help, then it's actually the sensible and efficient thing to do. ...


252

Why is this OK and not a red flag? So you seek someone who will do Software-engineering for you. The candidate you have at hand has a lot of experience in that area. He has achieved the highest rank possible where his main occupation still is software engineering - long ago, and he stayed with it. So chances are: He really loves what he is doing. He is ...


186

How can I productively channel this issue? It's not clear what "productively channel" means in this context. You do your job to the best of your ability. If that means your colleague appears comparatively diminished as a result, that's your bosses problem not yours. Do your work. Get rewarded accordingly. Let Sam and Sam's boss worry about his work and ...


178

To distill the story down to its core elements: the employee is a new, junior member of the team; a senior team member asked for help preparing a presentation; the specific request is objectionable. How the employee responds should depend on the way the request is objectionable: If she doesn't know how to perform the task, she should say so and ask for a ...


171

I will answer this from the perspective of personal experience. I've been in the same position for 12 years now. Here's why: When I started, my wife gave birth to twin boys. The economics of childcare dictated that she stay at home with them for several years. When she went back to work, I needed to remain in a stable as secure position for a couple of ...


154

Give him this picture. (The White dot is under the "i" in "him" - it’s Actually visible!) This is 1000x1000 all black pixel image with a single white pixel.


138

Whether you're asked for programming questions shouldn't be a critical factor in your decision. They might not ask you simply because they don't know how. That's why they want to hire a senior/lead developer, because they don't have the resources to train you. Example My workplace develops very technical products, and provides good career opportunities. My ...


134

The way to handle a request like that is to understand what the "customer" wants, and to ignore their implementation suggestions (in consulting, it's important to understand the difference between requirements and suggestions). The "customer" wants a visual of "one in a million" in their PowerPoint presentation. The "customer" suggests drawing a million ...


127

I did a series of talks on what makes code simple and readable. There is no absolute answer. Much depends on the vocabulary the reader brings. Take for example: bool retval; if (x > 0) { retval = true; } else { retval = false; } return retval; Compare this to return (x>0); To the complete beginners it's possible the first seems simpler, more ...


118

This junior developer has a flawed understanding of what a senior developer is supposed to do. A senior developer is senior, not because his technical knowledge overlaps everything a junior can do (it can, but doesn't have to), but because he can do things that a junior doesn't even understand. The senior developer can (should?) understand broad ...


96

I've always been a believer in following your "gut" and your gut is telling you that this guy won't be a good fit. You'll probably turn out to be right. If it were me, I'd follow that feeling and tell the guy "we're going in a different direction" and just leave it that. If you have to bring him back in, interview him as you normally would but when he ...


80

Let's give your question some context. Your company has: A 25-year old product A senior back-end developer with considerable institutional knowledge Assumption: Several mid/junior developers A desire to modernize the environment A translation layer Non-comprehensive list of translation layer requirements: Message transformation Message validation ...


79

I lack the appropriate skills? or Is it a lack of guidance on the part of the company? Both. You lack the required skills for the assignment (not your fault, but it's true). You cannot certainly gain the knowledge overnight. You need to understand the scope and ask for required training to update yourself about the domain and technology. Only then you ...


78

I think you're doing something here, out of goodness of your heart, that is preventing your boss from seeing the problem. If Sam struggles with something, based on the same-level position between the two of you, you are not actually responsible for him, but your boss. You don't have to be rude about it, but you can say "Hey Sam, I can't help with this ...


76

Essentially you can't It sounds like this senior developer is essentially taking the opportunity to not do their work. As an intern there really isn't anything you can do about that directly. Really the senior dev is only punishing themselves by doing this since they will have to pick up an unfamiliar codebase very quickly after you've gone, although they ...


70

Consider that "the same position" doesn't necessarily mean the same team, tech stack, project or even the same office. I personally work with a different client every 6-12 months, and I've learned a lot of new technologies, gotten significant raises, moved to a different branch, all without my job title ever changing. That might not be the norm, but it ...


65

Disclaimer: this answer will be written as if OP's coding style really is as complex as necessary (not over-complicated) and it's really good, efficient code (not something that could be done easier and in a more understandable way with the same result). I think I was in your position before. I was the "expert" guy working on integrating and ...


63

Why would it be a red flag? "Senior Software Engineer" or "Software Engineer III" could be the highest position in his company that still was able to code, so because of that, he maybe didn't want to become a manager or whoever else. Not every company creates fancy positions like "Senior Ninja Developer" or "Wizard JS Dev" just in order to give promotions.


60

The other answers are fine and mine should not be understood as exclusive. It's more of a lengthy explanation of the cultural background of why the other answers are correct: Germans tend to believe what you present in the interview. Compared to other countries, we are not used to people lying in an interview. Sure, a little white lie here or there or maybe ...


58

Full disclosure: I have been the Senior guy you are complaining about, in the past. I have been, not by choice but by necessity, the primary architect and developer of a framework strikingly similar to what you are describing. Let me tell you that I was aware of all technical and organizational problems during the whole time. It was an incremental process; ...


42

You have junior teammates, and your organisation needs your code to be comprehensible to them. This is critical. You've been given an unwritten requirement - your code must not only do the job, but it must also be maintainable by others. This is a very difficult balance to play. Compare the abstract factory pattern with a simple hash table of factory ...


37

The most important question, in my opinion, is: Can you afford to ignore applicants? For development jobs, at least here in Germany, there are so few applicants, that I interview everyone who is not obviously unqualified. I cannot afford to skip over someone based on too little information. For other jobs, when you have a hundred applications for one ...


37

I see a number of red flags here. First of all, you're a recent graduate, which means, without much experience in software development. Second, you graduated in mechanical engineering, not software. And they give you as your first task, to recognize objects in a video stream? Seriously? That's like asking someone who went through a 6-month training in ...


36

Weakness is undermining a teammate who asks for help. When I was starting out and there was no www, all help was in the form of manuals and advice from overworked colleagues, it was expected that you were supposed to know just about everything. The world has changed. There is so much out there that no person can possibly even begin to know everything. If ...


35

There are various nuances to take into account, depending essentially on what's in the mind of Mr. Senior. But a general answer would be : You can't do anything, and you have no reason whatsoever to do anything about it. There are two possibilities : either Mr. Senior is indeed too busy and is prioritizing some other work (going against Mr. Manager's ...


34

My code is “complex” because it’s well engineered. Failing that, my code is generally well commented and documented, so if all else fails, my colleagues have the means to help themselves. And yet what you call well engineered and documented code is being considered as hard to work with. Those are contradictory statements, as code that is well engineered ...


25

It's concerning that the company lets a Senior Developer be the only person with knowledge of a codebase; the Bus Factor (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_factor) is one, which is a very undesirable number. Send an email to the Senior Developer, asking for a meeting to discuss the codebase. Either he'll refuse by email, or he'll attend the meeting and ...


25

If it makes you feel better, I helped a couple of senior techs when I was an intern. Not because I was better than them or even smarter (I am not), it was because I happened to know the answer because I had done what they wanted to do before. Asking for help is not a weakness. This junior doesn't know what he is talking about (probably why he is a junior). ...


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