653

How about you wait for the interview before you judge that person... Not everyone is interested in climbing the corporate ladder Maybe there was no other position suited for them at the company At least it tells you that they are good enough to be kept around for over a decade Maybe they love what they do so much that they don't consider other positions ...


251

Why is this OK and not a red flag? So you seek someone who will do Software-engineering for you. The candidate you have at hand has a lot of experience in that area. He has achieved the highest rank possible where his main occupation still is software engineering - long ago, and he stayed with it. So chances are: He really loves what he is doing. He is ...


171

I will answer this from the perspective of personal experience. I've been in the same position for 12 years now. Here's why: When I started, my wife gave birth to twin boys. The economics of childcare dictated that she stay at home with them for several years. When she went back to work, I needed to remain in a stable as secure position for a couple of ...


69

Consider that "the same position" doesn't necessarily mean the same team, tech stack, project or even the same office. I personally work with a different client every 6-12 months, and I've learned a lot of new technologies, gotten significant raises, moved to a different branch, all without my job title ever changing. That might not be the norm, but it ...


63

Why would it be a red flag? "Senior Software Engineer" or "Software Engineer III" could be the highest position in his company that still was able to code, so because of that, he maybe didn't want to become a manager or whoever else. Not every company creates fancy positions like "Senior Ninja Developer" or "Wizard JS Dev" just in order to give promotions.


36

The most important question, in my opinion, is: Can you afford to ignore applicants? For development jobs, at least here in Germany, there are so few applicants, that I interview everyone who is not obviously unqualified. I cannot afford to skip over someone based on too little information. For other jobs, when you have a hundred applications for one ...


17

Why is this OK and not a red flag? It depends on the company's culture but for some, it is a red flag. The company I work in, a large one, considers that a candidate like this is not someone to invest in and will call contractors for profiles like this, preferring recruiting people able to "climb the ladder". For some other companies, it is a type of ...


15

Keep in mind some companies, particularly smaller ones, don't issue formal titles. I was a 'Software Developer' at one company for a number of years, but despite that title, I was effectively 'Head of Engineering'. So lesson - titles don't always mean a lot. Just because the candidate was in the same 'position' for 15 years, it doesn't mean they were ...


13

To paraphrase Hanlon's Razor, never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence, good intentions, or general lack of effort. I don't see any evidence here that your colleague is "slowing you down intentionally," or otherwise engaging in sabotage. After all, this has only been in the last couple of days. What does appear to be ...


13

I first wrote this as a comment; on the advice of @Benjamin I'm re-working it as an answer instead. To the extent that the premise of this question is "how can I change this situation which sucks and is boring," I'm not sure I can help (except to encourage you to recognize your own value, in the big picture - read on). But to the extent that it's "how can I ...


12

If you think there is a chance of them freeing you up from Project X for even one day a week, don't ask for learning time. Instead, try to identify the most urgent task that you would be doing if you were working in the role for which you were hired. Ask for a limited portion of your time to work on that, while continuing to spend most of your time on ...


12

That style of coding is not bad, it's just very verbose. Depending on the language being used it may also be outside the normal for coding style as is commonly used across the industry. In any case, unless there are specific style guidelines in use in the company or project that tell otherwise, there is nothing wrong with that code except that you have ...


10

If you ask someone over 50, they will likely say "it isn't" That's because for a very long time, people had one job for most of, if not all of, their lives. It's only the under 40 crowd that sees it as a negative, and only in industries like IT. A welder is still going to be a welder, a plumber is still going to be a plumber and they're not likely to ...


10

I would like to start by saying I do not believe it should be negatively perceived. However I can see why some people may see it as a negative, here's reasons why. Someone not looking to progress may be lacking desire in his career Someone who stays in their job for 15 years could have multiple reasons for staying, negative and positive. For example; The ...


10

I would go for entry level, if you add value you should progress quickly and impress while learning. If you aim too high and land a job you're not going to be good at you will get a bad reputation or mediocre one. It's always better to start strong so you can build and keep momentum.


9

In 1988, I hired into a certain large defense firm in a very similar capacity. Three weeks in, they pulled a similar reorganization. It took eight years to start to recover. Because of some other things that happened, I never really did. Your first step is to go up the ladder, ABOVE your current Program Manager, and discuss your concerns with HIS manager....


9

The accepted answer and the other higher rated answers are fine. One more though: The applicant stayed a long time at his current company. Chances are high, he won't leave you after a year to do further job hopping. So your investment in training a new employee are rather safe.


9

As a former IT contractor (25+ years in the game) I used to get rather irritated by people who thought they knew better than me based on less experience. I frequently had at least a decade's worth of experience more than the line manager to back up my design decisions. The people that I had time for were the ones who came to me to ask for explanations, put ...


8

You're clearly a great resource for your colleagues. Here are some ideas of how to protect time for yourself while being respectful of the needs of your colleagues: Talk to colleagues that demand an exceptional amount of your time. Let them know you are glad you can be helpful, are always available for challenging problems, but encourage them to engage ...


7

In many company structures the only way to "advance" above title of senior dev. roles is to become team leader / go into management / "boss" role in some sense. Not everyone has a personality suitable for this or even wants to do this.


7

Several of these answers are very good, and the advice given - talk to the guy and find out more - is correct. I'll add one other way to look at it: Ignore the title. Pretty much ignore (*) how many years he's been in the same position. Instead: Look for growth in the person. In his skills. In his scope. In his responsibility. In his knowledge. None ...


7

Any advice on what I should do? Given that you have already talked or tried to talk to your manager several times and they have ignored it as much as they can, only thing you can do is work at x for this contract period. Whenever you are due for next contract renewal, do not make the same mistake again. Stand your ground at Y or higher. of course you would ...


6

You took this way over-emotionally. Don't get me wrong, I empathize with you. You tried to help them and they threw you under the bus. The problem is, they are probably both immature. When they perceived that they were being attacked, which I bet they did, they defended themselves by blaming someone else. You. This is very much a "teachable moment" if you ...


6

I wonder what makes you think of this as a red flag. Obviously, your pre-set expectation is that people need to change jobs, preferably upwards, on a semi-regular basis. Question that assumption and check how much it is a result of your environment. I worked close to (but not in) the advertisement industry for a short while, long enough to catch that in ...


5

Bring this up with him as sort of a reminder, something along the lines of "I've noticed my recent PRs had stacked up lately, can you check them out if you have the time?". Of course, document your work as well: document when you started, when you finished them, when you reminded your senior about them, and when they get reviewed and merged. You'll at least ...


5

Most of what you've stated is subjective, meaning it's your opinion and not empirical evidence or undisputed fact. If you think the contractors methods aren't sound then you'll need top prove that with factual evidence and examples. Why are there methods unsound? What methods are better? What data can you show to prove that? The contractors are more ...


4

Junior. Because you ARE a junior. Juniors, broadly speaking, are people with roughly anything under 3 years experience. That's just how it is in the broadest, most generalized terms. That's not to say you'll stay there. But in the broadest terms you're a junior. Get the job, impress, and get promoted. If you're providing the value you claim you can, you'll ...


4

There are a lot of advantages, but since you asked about disadvantages, here are some: possible lack of flexibility A person who has successfully worked in numerous positions has demonstrated that they are able to contribute meaningfully under a variety of circumstances. Chances are therefore high that the candidate will work well in our circumstances. ...


4

I'd like to extend on lucasgb's excellent comment : in the real world, most code is crap. There are many reasons to that, the main one being the stakeholders panicking when the deadline approaches, transmitting their panick to the developpers, who then enter "quick and dirty mode", which they know they'll regret later - but still do it anyways. I've been ...


4

It depends on what kind of help is required on your part. Is it teaching new hires how the system works or is it just that you're more experienced and knowledgeable than your colleagues? In the first case you should have your manager know that some of your time will be dedicated to teaching and thus reduce your load or extend your deadlines. In the second ...


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